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Old 12-24-2010, 08:19 AM
 
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Something I read on another thread and I can't remember (and I'm too lazy to search for it) who wrote it, really has been resonating in my mind the last few days. Someone wrote that, and I am paraphrasing, that we underestimate the problems in areas that are percieved to be good, and overestimate the problems in areas perceived to be bad. A recent conversation I had with a close friend over lunch this week brought this into focus for me.

He lives in a nice area of Finneytown. Now, Finneytown ain't what it used to be, but one of his neighbors happened to surprise two unscrupulous youths stealing from his garage. Instead of running off, they proceeded to beat him to a bloody pulp in his garage, and he ended up hospitalized with serious injuries. And then, another friend of his who lives on Stettinius in Hyde Park has been burglarized twice and is looking to move. I even think back about ten years ago at this time of year (might have been Christmas Eve) about a young women who was brutally slaughtered outside her home on Stettinius. I never heard if they caught who did it.

And yet, I know people who live in the likes of Madisonville who have never had any problems, and frankly my one friend doesn't even have a door on his garage and nothing has ever been taken. I have neighbors who once lived on Wunder in Westwood, and never once had a problem, and now that they live in Oakley, their car got tossed.

I do believe that behind every stereotype there is some truth, but it amazes me how whether you live in Madisonville or Hyde Park, in spite of certain realities, can mean the difference of hundreds of thousands of dollars in the price of your home.
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Old 12-24-2010, 08:52 AM
 
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There are always a few examples that can be cited for how one is not safe anywhere. In some sense this is true in that random crimes do happen. But that is where the logical part of the analysis ends. It is the same sentiment that says that being a safe driver will not really keep one safe because someone can always cross the highway and hit you head on and kill you. Only in the neighborhood example, it is a whole lot less likely for a person living on Stettinius to be a crime victim in their home than a safe driver being struck by an errant vehicle.

As for the specifics, I believe that the young women who was assaulted and languished in a coma (where is she today?) had just broken up with her boy friend and had just been out on a date with another guy and was attacked at that time. And, I think that was Zumstein not Stettinius. And, Stettinius is within a baseball throw from Withrow "Academy" where there would be about 500 convicted felons showing up every day but for the rules of Juvenile Court causing criminals under 18 to be regarded as unruly as opposed to criminal.

Yes, there are some break-ins in Hyde Park, yes, there is some domestic violence, sometimes tragic. But it is worth every penny to live in a neighborhood where two teenagers in your driveway gets a call to the police by one or more neighbors if you are not home. I've lived in bad neighborhoods and currently work every day in OTR and I'll tell you, there is an enormous difference.
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Old 12-24-2010, 09:20 AM
 
Location: Mason, OH
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Quote:
Originally Posted by t45209 View Post
I do believe that behind every stereotype there is some truth, but it amazes me how whether you live in Madisonville or Hyde Park, in spite of certain realities, can mean the difference of hundreds of thousands of dollars in the price of your home.
There are always exceptions to every general rule, and people who live in pockets of certain neighborhoods may certainly be as law-abiding, good natured to their fellow man, and nice to know people as you can find. Every stereotype is built on something, warranted or not. In my opinion, Madisonville began to go downhill over 50 years ago and has never come close to showing signs of true recovery. So yes, there are good reasons why homes can differ hundreds of thousands of dollar in price.
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Old 12-24-2010, 09:49 AM
 
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Just a musing that's kind of tangential to the topic of this interesting thread: when I worked in downtown revitalization we had a saying to the effect of "perception is everything." For example, people wouldn't come to the downtowns of small to medium sized towns because they had the notion there was no place to park. When in reality, they could drive around to the back of a line of buildings and park a half block from their destination. Which, in reality, was a much shorter walk than they would be making if they'd gone out on the bypass to the mall.

I think this principle certainly applies to property values in neighborhoods, too. Better if you want to avoid becoming a crime victim to try to rationally analyze what's likely to happen on a micro basis, i.e., an individual house or even an individual street, not an entire neighborhood.
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Old 12-24-2010, 10:12 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by t45209 View Post
He lives in a nice area of Finneytown. Now, Finneytown ain't what it used to be, but one of his neighbors happened to surprise two unscrupulous youths stealing from his garage. Instead of running off, they proceeded to beat him to a bloody pulp in his garage, and he ended up hospitalized with serious injuries.
My family lives in what I would call one of the nicer areas of Finneytown. Could you give me a general idea of where this incident occured?
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Old 12-25-2010, 06:59 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CincyExpert View Post
My family lives in what I would call one of the nicer areas of Finneytown. Could you give me a general idea of where this incident occured?
Somewhere in the vicinity of Zenith, but not sure of the exact location.
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Old 12-25-2010, 07:12 AM
 
1,130 posts, read 2,027,171 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wilson1010 View Post
There are always a few examples that can be cited for how one is not safe anywhere. In some sense this is true in that random crimes do happen. But that is where the logical part of the analysis ends. It is the same sentiment that says that being a safe driver will not really keep one safe because someone can always cross the highway and hit you head on and kill you. Only in the neighborhood example, it is a whole lot less likely for a person living on Stettinius to be a crime victim in their home than a safe driver being struck by an errant vehicle.

As for the specifics, I believe that the young women who was assaulted and languished in a coma (where is she today?) had just broken up with her boy friend and had just been out on a date with another guy and was attacked at that time. And, I think that was Zumstein not Stettinius. And, Stettinius is within a baseball throw from Withrow "Academy" where there would be about 500 convicted felons showing up every day but for the rules of Juvenile Court causing criminals under 18 to be regarded as unruly as opposed to criminal.

Yes, there are some break-ins in Hyde Park, yes, there is some domestic violence, sometimes tragic. But it is worth every penny to live in a neighborhood where two teenagers in your driveway gets a call to the police by one or more neighbors if you are not home. I've lived in bad neighborhoods and currently work every day in OTR and I'll tell you, there is an enormous difference.
I think you are right...it was Zumstein. Fortunately, I think we live in a city where irrespective of neighborhood, there are few random acts of violence. The people who get killed in Cincinnati are generally engaged in a lifestyle that begs for them to get popped. You take that out of the mix, and Westwood to Mt. Washington, our crime stats would be hard to distinguish one neighborhood from the next. Sure, you will have predators like that freak that killed those young girls in Mt Airy, or that thug that killed that guy in the parking lot outside of what is now the Pig & Whistle in Hyde Park/Norwood. But as long as we have an illegal drug trade, those are the people that will pump up the stats in any given neighborhood. And even though their crimes are mostly focused on those that engage in that activity with them, it ends up branding an entire community.
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Old 12-25-2010, 10:09 AM
 
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^ you're right where's there's money there's murder.
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Old 12-26-2010, 01:20 PM
 
Location: Columbus,Ohio
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There is the old cliche: " The predator goes where the prey is". Often when crime happens in the more nicer areas , the thug or perp is not from that particular neighborhood but from a poorer area that is all not thriving. The scumballs usually knows that in the nicer areas people have more so they go where there more opportunities to commit their crimes.
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Old 12-26-2010, 01:36 PM
 
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Originally Posted by otters21 View Post
There is the old cliche: " The predator goes where the prey is". Often when crime happens in the more nicer areas , the thug or perp is not from that particular neighborhood but from a poorer area that is all not thriving. The scumballs usually knows that in the nicer areas people have more so they go where there more opportunities to commit their crimes.
Sounds good but not accurate. Scumballs can almost always be found in scumballville. Rarely do they venture out to commit crimes. And the crime venues are almost always on the route between one scumball center to another.

It is probably 100 times more likely to be robbed on the street at Findlay Market than at Rookwood Commons despite the fact that the typical person on the street at Elm and Findlay have one one-hundredth of the assets on their person as the shopper at Rookwood Commons.

Of course there are not many thugs in Hyde Park as OTR. The reason is that if you are a criminal you are detined to be poor because crime is the second biggest cause of poverty. (Addiction being the first).
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