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Old 02-18-2011, 12:10 PM
 
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Hi, I'm thinking of moving to Wyoming, and was wondering if it's a good place to raise teenagers.
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Old 02-18-2011, 12:41 PM
 
Location: Mason, OH
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Originally Posted by robin33 View Post
Hi, I'm thinking of moving to Wyoming, and was wondering if it's a good place to raise teenagers.
If you don't bore them to death. Seriously it should be a fine place as the schools are consistently rated top notch. But the housing stock is a little on the elderly side. And once you leave the cities boundaries it is quite some distance to anyplace they would find enticing.
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Old 02-18-2011, 01:19 PM
 
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Thanks. The schools certainly make it a serious consideration, but you're right there's not a lot around for them to do.
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Old 02-18-2011, 02:19 PM
 
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Wyoming has a very nice recreation center- something I was envious of growing up in neighboring Finneytown.
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Old 02-18-2011, 03:08 PM
 
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I'm not sure what teens would have to do someplace else that they wouldn't have in Wyoming. Presumably the 5-star school system provides a lot of extracurricular opportunities, the community has the aforementioned recreation center and an arts center, there's a public library, churches of several denominations, a LaBullBoxer31 and a Skyline where they can just hang out--am I missing something?
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Old 02-19-2011, 08:50 AM
 
Location: Cambridge, MA
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Default The latest, and not last, goyguy soliloquy on Wyoming

It makes me roll my eyes every time I'm back in Wyoming and drive north on Springfield Pike: two blocks beyond the Woodlawn boundary is where you'll find the Wyoming Rec Center. But - just as in other communities of similar average income level - who's kidding who? When people have backyard pools, sometimes tennis courts, and home theaters at their houses (or the kids have friends who do) they're not going to use it anyway. The local Civic Center - somewhat more centrally located - has a large rectangular expanse of lawn out back which used to contain heavily-used tennis courts. (Yours Truly picked up some preppie street cred during childhood there: in the audience at community theater productions, semi-reluctant participation in ballroom dance classes, a summer of tennis lessons which went to show that the next Andre Agassi I wasn't.) Tennis will never return to the Civic Center. 25-30 years ago, a young boy darted into traffic on "the Pike" to retrieve an errant ball and was struck and killed by a car. But candlepin bowling keeps on keepin' on.
Youth sports demigod Gene Pittman may have gone on to the knothole diamond in the sky, but the recreation commission maintains a cornucopia of baseball/football/etc leagues and various classes. And what suburb wouldn't have adult-ed classes?
Growing up in Wyoming, I - as did my friends - envied the kids who were lucky enough to live in "happening" places like Clifton. I plead the Fifth Amendment in terms of having known the Metro bus schedule for trips to the UC area or downtown on weekdays during the school year. But I think most parents prefer that their offspring call a boring suburb home. As if, with not only the Internet but now "smart phones," it's remotely possible for children to be stuck with nothing to do.
One person's "vintage gem" is another's "elderly" house. I doubt the day will ever arrive when the neighborhoods carved out of woods and farmland in the '60s to accommodate city escapees will be seen as historically significant. But those Colonials at least allow for some color variation on the second-floor exterior, and have respectably sized yards. The same can't be said for the exurban sprawl areas in Butler, Warren, and Clermont counties. Most of the dwellings either resemble clumsy Colonial knock-offs, or lumps of oatmeal, and perch on postage-stamp lots. Though nearly all the undeveloped tracts in Wyoming are now under conservation restrictions, a few tiny subdivisions are managing to get shoehorned in. One of those is the almost-new and mostly McMansion enclave off Bonham Rd just inside the city boundary. In the older sections of town, anything from a generic mid-20th-Century Cape Cod to a sprawling Victorian can be obtained. Within my love/hate relationship with my home 'burb lies a strong affection for its housing stock. But if somebody would prefer to put their stake in a "Dreesville," that's their business.
As for being a teen in that town, the experience probably mirrors that of kids in suburbia across the land. The predictable cliques are all there. Except for the stoners and jocks, peer networks are largely set up according to socioeconomic level, with AA students (~10-15% of the population) mainly in groups unto themselves. Wyoming was never entirely WASP nor was it ever only affluent, but there always has been and probably always will be more than a touch of snobbery in the air. (That's where my love/hate relationship falls on the "hate" side - and why I, for my part, sometimes envied peers in less pretentious Finneytown. ) As is true anyplace, if you have an assertive and confident son or daughter the social boundaries blur.
Where the "love" comes in again is on the educational front - both in and out of school. Like all kids I chafed at deadly grammar lessons and math tables. And I went Bart Simpson one better by being an underachiever "and proud of it, man!" Even so, osmosis did what it did. Today I treasure the rigorous and motivated teaching I was subjected to. And I know that as language skills keep deteriorating and calculator-free math becomes an alien concept Wyoming graduates will still know how to speak + write + do 'rithmetic. Between classes and out of school, the demographic shifts in town which set WASP tongues wagging imparted an essential life lesson. It doesn't matter how much money is earned in your household or what you look like or who you vote for or what - if any - belief system you subscribe to. You're either a good (or cool) person or you're not. My "Bart Simpson" clique of alienated upper-middle-class lads included AA and Jewish boys. Until death or Alzheimer's takes me I'll remember the Irish Catholic guy who was my best bud for three years until his family moved away from their overcrowded, rented, Cape. And no one had to explain to me what Nikki Giovanni meant when she wrote "Black love is Black wealth," for I'd felt that love as far back as kindergarten. For all that Wyoming is and isn't, I doubt that any other Cincinnati suburb can turn out high school graduates with not only good SAT scores but a true understanding of all kinds of humans who aren't like them. Ehhh...maybe the Princeton, Northwest, Finneytown, Lakota, and Winton Woods districts - and Fairfield - can. But they're, you know, uh, not Wyoming.
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Old 02-20-2011, 03:54 PM
 
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I was recently (about six months ago) on a flight with a woman from Wyoming and she and her husband were raising a couple of daughters there. They could definitely afford to live there and it sounded like they lived right in the heart of the village in a very nice older home. It all sounded wonderful to me, but she said she and her husband were considering leaving Wyoming. She said they weren't feeling like they were getting bang for the buck with the high taxes they paid, although the schools are great. But her biggest concern was that they felt like they lived on an island. Being surrounded by Woodlawn, Lockland, Lincoln Heights, Hartwell, and other less prosperous areas didn't suit her. She worried that the kids as they got older would feel hemmed in, because, no, there isn't much to do in Wyoming, and you have to travel pretty far to get to anything you really want to go to. And she worried that the surrounding areas were starting to bleed over into Wyoming and affect property values. If anything, I can think of some areas of Wyoming, particularly on the north end of Burns Ave, that are much improved in recent years, but I don't live there so can't say for sure.
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Old 02-22-2011, 02:12 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
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We just moved to Wyoming about 6 months ago from Lebanon. We absolutely love it here! I don't know why people say there's nothing to do here. If you live in any of the suburbs (west Chester, Mason, Lebanon, Montgomery, Blue Ash), you are going to drive to the movie theater or mall, just like we have to do here. The nice thing, is that if you live down in the village, or close to it, you can walk to a few restaurants and shops within Wyoming. It's a walking community. I see people out walking dogs in all weather, and many runners out all the time, plus kids walk to school. There's a fine arts center, coffee shop, library, bakery, civic center, park and other areas all within a few minutes walk from my house. When we lived in Lebanon we had to hop into the car to get anywhere. I'm not sure what activities you are looking for your kids, but there seems to be everything here. You have a very active community here who are very invested in the schools. Everything around here is schools first, which is what drew us here. If the kids want to go to a movie or the mall, you are only 10 minutes from either by car. You are also fairly close to downtown to go to a game or show. We are loving being so much closer to downtown for all the cultural activities. We have season tickets to the Bengals, and used to dread our 40+ minute drive to the game and now we are downtown in less than 15 minutes.

If you have any questions on the area, let me know. We did a lot of research before moving to Wyoming, so I'm very familiar with the areas that have the top schools. We originally moved to Lebanon since we didn't know Cincinnati, as we were moving in from CT. After 5 years up in Lebanon, we wanted to get to a top school system, closer to the city, and so we relocated down to Wyoming.
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Old 02-23-2011, 07:35 PM
 
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Thank you everyone for such good information. I found Wyoming to be a very friendly place when I visited. Does anyone know how difficult it is to make the high school sports teams(not football), I was thinking more like cheerleading or soccer? I thought that it might making getting to know the other kids a little easier. My kids aren't overly athletic.
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Old 02-23-2011, 07:42 PM
 
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Originally Posted by robin33 View Post
Thank you everyone for such good information. I found Wyoming to be a very friendly place when I visited. Does anyone know how difficult it is to make the high school sports teams(not football), I was thinking more like cheerleading or soccer? I thought that it might making getting to know the other kids a little easier. My kids aren't overly athletic.
Wyoming HS's athletics are pretty competitive all around for a school of its size. They win their league's All-Sports Trophy every year. I'm sure if your kids are hard workers they can find their niches athletically at Wyoming.
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