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Old 03-25-2011, 04:55 PM
 
116 posts, read 389,332 times
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Hi guys!

We're relocating from the Northeast, and are just torn between living within the city limits of Cincy and living right outside, like Evendale or Blue Ash--with children.

Having lived in Chicago (well, VERY CLOSE), we found that living one block away from the city limits was at times an impediment as the "city" of Harwood Heights had their own rules such as parking, etc. Also, we didn't have access to the free museum passes that were given at the various Chicago libraries.

What do you guys think? Living within the city limits or right outside?
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Old 03-25-2011, 05:02 PM
 
116 posts, read 389,332 times
Reputation: 27
I just noticed that someone else had a similar question--and posted today even!

Our situation is slightly different as my husband will be working in different locations, mostly east (in the city) and northeast (again, in the city). Also, our children are under 2--not in school. We are not looking at schools as this is a temporary move (one year).

I love being active, and am looking for bike trails, libraries, museums, etc.

We loved living in Chicago, love the city. We don't know much about Cincy. Thus the question whether we should live or outside the city.

Ultimately, would we shoot ourselves in the foot by living outside the city limits? Are there things like libraries, etc. that we would be prevented from attending/doing because we're not officially residents of the city?
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Old 03-25-2011, 05:14 PM
 
Location: Ohio
400 posts, read 937,693 times
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Default libraries

The library system is county-wide. Its full name is the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County. There are umpteem branches all over the county. One card is good at all of them, and if the branch you're at doesn't have the item you want, you can get it sent there from the downtown library or another branch. It also has interlibrary loan if you need something obscure from another part of the state or country, but there is a charge to do that.
There's no distinction that I know of for any of the museums. You have to pay admission to all of them, although there are different types of discounts (AAA, packages, entertainment books, etc.). The discounts have nothing to do with your residency.
It's a different situation with the swimming pools. The City of Cincinnati USED to have neighborhood public pools but this year most of them won't be opening this year due to budget cuts. You DO have to live in the Cincinnati city limits to go to them. Some of the neighborhoods (I know about Sayler Park and Northside; there are probably others) are doing their own fundraisers for their local pools and trying to make enough to hire lifeguards and run the pools themselves.
Many of the other cities and villages in Hamilton County have their own city pools for their own residents. Of course there are always private clubs or the YMCAs, but even some of them are closing or have closed due to lack of revenue.
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Old 03-25-2011, 05:37 PM
 
Location: Cambridge, MA
4,730 posts, read 10,959,643 times
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The Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County is just that - no geographic restrictions. Similarly, the county parks are open to everyone. Nothing in Cincinnati that I can think of has any "residents only" sign in front.
Since schools aren't a consideration, the type of neighborhood you'd want to live in takes precedence. There's an overabundance of suburban communities with cookie-cutter houses built between 1945 and last week, all the way from Green Township in the west to Clermont County in the east. In these areas the kids could play in the street at any time but you'd have to have a vehicle to shop or go out to eat or do anything. By contrast, most city neighborhoods and some inner suburbs have many amenities close at hand along with varied styles of housing, though you might need to keep a closer eye on the young 'uns.
This is an oversimplified answer, obviously, but then again the question was also very nonspecific. Going with what have been put forth as criteria, the following locales could prove to be happy places to settle in:
Loveland (non-city) - small older village with many '60s-90s subdivisions, northeastern suburb with its major asset being the Little Miami River and its surrounding biking/hiking trails;
Mt Washington (city) - one of the easternmost Cincinnati neighborhoods, affordable relative to its wealthier western abutters (Mt Lookout for one)
New Richmond (non-city) - riverside town in Clermont County
White Oak (non-city) - post-WWII developments with a "family" feel and good open space
Clifton (city) - home of the University of Cincinnati and a multitude of neat restaurants and shops, varied enclaves from the Gaslight District (mansions and other upscale homes) to University Hts (many apartment buildings and smaller homes)
Mariemont (non-city) - self-styled "English village" on the east side, decidedly upscale
Lockland (non-city) - a "mixed bag" just north of town, with not-so-nice parts but also pleasant sections on the east and north sides especially
Westwood (city) - Cincinnati's largest community, sketchy east of and along McHenry Ave but otherwise fine, with a wealth of housing choices
Hartwell (city) + Valleydale ("unincorporated" area immediately to the west) + Wyoming (non-city, immediately to the north) - tranquil, shaded neighborhoods holding Victorians as well as cottages
Silverton (non-city) - solidly middle-class and comfortably "integrated," northeast of town between the city and the Kenwood mall sprawl, near I-71
Pleasant Ridge (city) - much like Silverton but with more larger houses and also more of an urban feel, along with the 'nati enclave of Kennedy Heights which lies between them
Greenhills (non-city) - one of the 1930's "greenbelt" experiment towns, and the only one with its greenbelt intact, a close-knit burg NNW of downtown comprised mainly of well-kept smaller houses

...for starters!
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Old 03-25-2011, 07:12 PM
 
116 posts, read 389,332 times
Reputation: 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by goyguy View Post
The Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County is just that - no geographic restrictions. Similarly, the county parks are open to everyone. Nothing in Cincinnati that I can think of has any "residents only" sign in front.
Since schools aren't a consideration, the type of neighborhood you'd want to live in takes precedence. There's an overabundance of suburban communities with cookie-cutter houses built between 1945 and last week, all the way from Green Township in the west to Clermont County in the east. In these areas the kids could play in the street at any time but you'd have to have a vehicle to shop or go out to eat or do anything. By contrast, most city neighborhoods and some inner suburbs have many amenities close at hand along with varied styles of housing, though you might need to keep a closer eye on the young 'uns.
This is an oversimplified answer, obviously, but then again the question was also very nonspecific. Going with what have been put forth as criteria, the following locales could prove to be happy places to settle in:
Loveland (non-city) - small older village with many '60s-90s subdivisions, northeastern suburb with its major asset being the Little Miami River and its surrounding biking/hiking trails;
Mt Washington (city) - one of the easternmost Cincinnati neighborhoods, affordable relative to its wealthier western abutters (Mt Lookout for one)
New Richmond (non-city) - riverside town in Clermont County
White Oak (non-city) - post-WWII developments with a "family" feel and good open space
Clifton (city) - home of the University of Cincinnati and a multitude of neat restaurants and shops, varied enclaves from the Gaslight District (mansions and other upscale homes) to University Hts (many apartment buildings and smaller homes)
Mariemont (non-city) - self-styled "English village" on the east side, decidedly upscale
Lockland (non-city) - a "mixed bag" just north of town, with not-so-nice parts but also pleasant sections on the east and north sides especially
Westwood (city) - Cincinnati's largest community, sketchy east of and along McHenry Ave but otherwise fine, with a wealth of housing choices
Hartwell (city) + Valleydale ("unincorporated" area immediately to the west) + Wyoming (non-city, immediately to the north) - tranquil, shaded neighborhoods holding Victorians as well as cottages
Silverton (non-city) - solidly middle-class and comfortably "integrated," northeast of town between the city and the Kenwood mall sprawl, near I-71
Pleasant Ridge (city) - much like Silverton but with more larger houses and also more of an urban feel, along with the 'nati enclave of Kennedy Heights which lies between them
Greenhills (non-city) - one of the 1930's "greenbelt" experiment towns, and the only one with its greenbelt intact, a close-knit burg NNW of downtown comprised mainly of well-kept smaller houses

...for starters!

Holy cow!! That's an amazing reply!! Thank you so much!
I guess what we're looking at is proximity to everything--I don't want to have to drive everywhere, and activities like bike trails, parks, pools (or bodies of water .

What do you think of Evendale and Blue Ash? (and/or around there--we see some nice houses for rent, but don't know much about community)
vs. Norwood (we found a cute little place that seems wonderful)?
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Old 03-26-2011, 07:38 AM
 
2,886 posts, read 3,960,979 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quebecoise30 View Post
Holy cow!! That's an amazing reply!! Thank you so much!
I guess what we're looking at is proximity to everything--I don't want to have to drive everywhere, and activities like bike trails, parks, pools (or bodies of water .

What do you think of Evendale and Blue Ash? (and/or around there--we see some nice houses for rent, but don't know much about community)
vs. Norwood (we found a cute little place that seems wonderful)?
All three of the places above are their own municipalities, in other words, they are not part of the City of Cincinnati, just part of the larger metro area. Blue Ash, which is its own city, has amazing recreational facilities paid for by its substantial commercial tax base of companies located in a sprawling but reasonably attractive and very well-maintained office park. Evendale I suspect has some fairly nice facilities of that type, too, although it's an older area and its still-substantial commercial base is more industrial. Norwood is traditionally an older, more urban blue-collar community which is seeing some revitalization and reinvestment. I'd say the recreational opportunities near that area would be much more limited, although if you find a neighborhood that looks right for you it still might be an option.
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Old 03-26-2011, 09:21 AM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,392,180 times
Reputation: 1920
Evendale is still a recipient of their largest employer, GE Aircraft Engines taxes. As such it pays for many of the cities amenities.

As commented, Blue Ash benefits from the large industrial park within their boundaries which was originally intended to be the site for the new Cincinnati airport. When Boone county across the river jumped the gun and built what is now CVG, there was suddenly this large parcel of ground, which already had suburban development completely around it and building to the North, available as prime property. Developed into commercial property, with the main drag Reed Hartman Highway north/south down through the center, little ole Blue Ash became an economic powerhouse.

I cannot give you an accurate current evaluation of Norwood. I know it is totally surrounded by Cincinnati. My employer was located and I worked there for 23 years. The old time industrial employers, GM Fisher Body in downtown, R.K.LeBlond on Edwards Rd., Cincinnati Milacron in closeby Oakley, and many other companies of national scope. When I worked there from the late 50s to the early 80s it was definitely a blue-collar type of town. With the demise of manufacturing I know it fell on hard times. Since my employer left there in the early 80s, I can honestly say I have not been back there more than a dozen times. As you go East from Norwood you encounter Pleasant Ridge, Kennedy Heights, and then Silverton.

I would like to hear from some current residents of Norwood and why they feel it is a family friendly neighborhood. Frankly, back in my younger days it would probably be one of the last places I would have chosen to live. But I do know times change, and relative value for the buck, neighborhood stability, etc. may mean Norwood is currently a vibrant community.
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