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Old 05-15-2011, 08:07 AM
 
Location: Covington, KY
1,879 posts, read 2,123,049 times
Reputation: 590

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I just checked "Maps 'n' Stats" (no links allowed) for something, and to my absolute amazement:

1. Columbus is the biggest city in the state.

2. Cleveland itself has less than a half of a million in population.

4. Dayton, with it's meager 166,179 population left, is still sixth in size in the state and fourth on the list of "top places."

5. Both Lexington (260,512 pop.) and Louisville (256,231 pop.) in Kentucky are towns of more than a quarter of a million people -- compare to Cincinnati (331,285 pop.).

While there is about 75,000 difference between Cincinnati and down in Kentucky, that ain't much, particularly when you consider that Lexington is not even listed among the top places. (In other words, they got nothing of substantial interest.)
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Old 05-15-2011, 08:14 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
171 posts, read 295,142 times
Reputation: 116
That's not looking at metropolitan areas. Columbus has a larger area that is incorporated as the city vs Cincy which has more in the suburbs. Not really a stat that is that meaningful unless you look at metro area to really understand the size of a city...Newer cities tend to have larger land masses as they developed later so they could make their cities larger and get more tax revenues. Check out the size of Jacksonville, FL for example...
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Old 05-15-2011, 09:02 AM
 
10,139 posts, read 22,424,007 times
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Those stats are totally irrelevant.

Cincinnati and its suburbs and 2 million people extend into three states 7 counties and what, 100 towns and villages?

Lexington and Louisville (nice as they are) are out in the middle of nowhere.
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Old 05-15-2011, 09:43 AM
 
Location: Covington, KY
1,879 posts, read 2,123,049 times
Reputation: 590
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wilson513 View Post
Those stats are totally irrelevant.

Cincinnati and its suburbs and 2 million people extend into three states 7 counties and what, 100 towns and villages?

Lexington and Louisville (nice as they are) are out in the middle of nowhere.

???

Federal tax money? POSTSCRIPT CORRECTION: Federal money, period. (I'm not too awake.)

.

Last edited by CarpathianPeasant; 05-15-2011 at 10:35 AM..
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Old 05-15-2011, 09:57 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
3,335 posts, read 5,729,880 times
Reputation: 2058
in terms of the city itself, cincinnati is half empty (current city infrastructure could support double the current population), even while the metro area is quite large. such is the plight of midwestern cities: although the metro itself isn't losing population, all of the suburban growth comes at the expense of the core. contrast this to many western cities, where suburban growth is a response to legitimate increase in population. lexington is an interesting anomaly: the urban growth boundary has kept the core of the city strong. that is a big part of the reason lexington remains a destination city.

it isn't apples to apples with other midwestern cities: look at total city boundaries and metro area sizes for a sense of that.
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Old 05-15-2011, 11:15 AM
 
864 posts, read 1,197,153 times
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Both Lexington and Louisville are consolidated city/county which is why the population is the way it is. Cincinnati only has 78 sq. miles within city limits. If Cincinnati did the same and combined with Hamilton County, we would have a population of 845,300.
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Old 05-15-2011, 04:54 PM
 
Location: Covington, KY
1,879 posts, read 2,123,049 times
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There's always "if" and "if" and the way the statistics read.

Things tend to be done on the way the statistics read and rarely if ever on "if."

If bedraggled Dayton consolidated with Montgomery county.... Well, beyond a few "deals," I wouldn't expect it in this world and probably not in the next, either.

.
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Old 05-15-2011, 08:18 PM
 
864 posts, read 1,197,153 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CarpathianPeasant View Post
There's always "if" and "if" and the way the statistics read.

Things tend to be done on the way the statistics read and rarely if ever on "if."

If bedraggled Dayton consolidated with Montgomery county.... Well, beyond a few "deals," I wouldn't expect it in this world and probably not in the next, either.

.
If you were really concerned with how the statistics read, you would know you're whole argument is completely irrelevant.

Cincinnati City Limits: Area= 78 sq. miles. Density=4,273 people/sq. mile
Lexington City Limits: Area= 284.4 sq. miles Density= 953 people/sq. mile
Louisville City Limits: Area= 399 sq. miles Density= 1,866 people/sq. mile

So, "if" you would like to pull out your calculator, you will see the Lexington city limits are about 3.65 times the size of Cincinnati, and Louisville's city limits are about 5.12 times the size of Cincinnati.

Look at the city limits area. Look at the density. Now, you will see Lexington and Louisville get inflated population numbers because they have bigger city limits.

At any rate, it is Metro populations that count.
Cincinnati Metro: 2,130, 151
Lexington Metro: 453,424
Louisville Metro: 1,307,647

So again, "if" you would like to pull out your calculator, you will see how things really stack up.
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Old 05-15-2011, 09:21 PM
 
Location: Covington, KY
1,879 posts, read 2,123,049 times
Reputation: 590
Quote:
Originally Posted by CinciFan View Post
If you were really concerned with how the statistics read, you would know you're whole argument is completely irrelevant.

Cincinnati City Limits: Area= 78 sq. miles. Density=4,273 people/sq. mile
Lexington City Limits: Area= 284.4 sq. miles Density= 953 people/sq. mile
Louisville City Limits: Area= 399 sq. miles Density= 1,866 people/sq. mile

So, "if" you would like to pull out your calculator, you will see the Lexington city limits are about 3.65 times the size of Cincinnati, and Louisville's city limits are about 5.12 times the size of Cincinnati.

Look at the city limits area. Look at the density. Now, you will see Lexington and Louisville get inflated population numbers because they have bigger city limits.

At any rate, it is Metro populations that count.
Cincinnati Metro: 2,130, 151
Lexington Metro: 453,424
Louisville Metro: 1,307,647

So again, "if" you would like to pull out your calculator, you will see how things really stack up.

????

If the government is sending money on the basis of how many people there are, it doesn't matter how much space they occupy.

If the premiums for fire insurance are based on how good the fire department is, one can sit right outside a corporation line it's not going to get someone a better deal if the better fire department is on the other side of the corporation line.

.
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Old 05-16-2011, 05:56 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
31,199 posts, read 57,331,348 times
Reputation: 52057
Psst ... Columbus has been the largest city in Ohio for quite some time now. Where have you been?
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