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Old 07-02-2011, 11:51 AM
 
5,807 posts, read 10,355,053 times
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Some of you might be interested in this website.

This could also be a useful website for people who are looking to relocate to.
A great useful tool for those who want to understand the neighborhoods of Cincinnati.


the social areas of cincinnati 2004

There is also a whole chapter on Appalachians of Cincinnati as well:

Appalachian Cincinnati
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Old 07-02-2011, 12:09 PM
 
Location: Cambridge, MA
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I eat this stuff for breakfast!
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Old 07-02-2011, 01:20 PM
 
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I may or may not be very closely related to one of the authors of this report... . I think an updated version should be coming out within the next year or so.
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Old 07-02-2011, 10:30 PM
 
405 posts, read 754,275 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tex?Il? View Post
Some of you might be interested in this website.

This could also be a useful website for people who are looking to relocate to.
A great useful tool for those who want to understand the neighborhoods of Cincinnati.


the social areas of cincinnati 2004

There is also a whole chapter on Appalachians of Cincinnati as well:

Appalachian Cincinnati
Pretty cool report. It needs a fifth edition, however. So much has happened since 2004.

Last edited by wolden; 07-02-2011 at 10:31 PM.. Reason: typo
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Old 07-05-2011, 02:16 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
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this report is awesome. definitely THE source for analysis of census data. highlights are a current (as of 2000) picture of each neighborhood as "declining," "stable," or "improving," a picture of change since 1970, and organizing all neighborhoods into one of four "quartiles."

the most interesting factoid: only the "nicest" neighborhoods have experience continuous population DECLINE since 1970.

really awesome. i can't wait for the new version based on 2010 data. probably in 2013 or 2014.
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Old 07-05-2011, 03:11 PM
 
478 posts, read 1,652,056 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by progmac View Post
this report is awesome. definitely THE source for analysis of census data. highlights are a current (as of 2000) picture of each neighborhood as "declining," "stable," or "improving," a picture of change since 1970, and organizing all neighborhoods into one of four "quartiles."

the most interesting factoid: only the "nicest" neighborhoods have experience continuous population DECLINE since 1970.

really awesome. i can't wait for the new version based on 2010 data. probably in 2013 or 2014.
So, basically, Cincy is getting crappier over time...as the nice neighborhood residents move out of city limits.

On a side note, I wonder if Cincy could pull off a Columbus-like annexation plan in one fell swoop?

If Cincinnati could somehow convince Anderson, Delhi, Miami, and Green townships to annex into Cincinnati, they'd be back over 400,000 residents. The deal would have to include keeping school districts separate...

Normally, as a suburban guy, I hate the idea of annexation to the central city, but I think it could work as it has near Columbus. The idea being that perhaps with 150k new voters in the suburbs, they could have enough influence to add some new blood to the city government and right the ship, in exchange for some nice property tax and water rate breaks.

It would be a tough sell, but Delhi "might" go for it since they have more financial problems IIRC.

I do understand the state has either enacted or proposed ideas to reduce the number of local governments, such as merging townships, etc. The arguments in favor:

1. They already have a Cincy mailing address.
2. Schools stay seperate.
3. If done right, property tax reduction would outweigh income tax for some people (others who work in the city already would be unaffected)
4. Influence in Cincy's political process - more outside voter influence could elect better representatives
5. Consolidated fire and police coverage - existing township depts could be made into new precincts of Cincinnati police.
6. Lower water/sewer rates

Last edited by hairmetal4ever; 07-05-2011 at 03:23 PM..
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Old 07-05-2011, 03:58 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hairmetal4ever View Post
So, basically, Cincy is getting crappier over time...as the nice neighborhood residents move out of city limits.
Basically, no not at all. Of the different neighborhood types, only the nicest saw continual population decline; none of the three "lower" tiers saw the same decline. Basically it turns the idea of population decline = neighborhood decline on its head and THAT is why it was interesting. For example, today Oakley is smaller in population than in 1970 but much nicer.

You can have your thoughts but this study does not support them or speak to them directly really at all.
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Old 07-05-2011, 04:24 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati near
2,509 posts, read 3,357,650 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by progmac View Post
Basically, no not at all. Of the different neighborhood types, only the nicest saw continual population decline; none of the three "lower" tiers saw the same decline. Basically it turns the idea of population decline = neighborhood decline on its head and THAT is why it was interesting. For example, today Oakley is smaller in population than in 1970 but much nicer.

You can have your thoughts but this study does not support them or speak to them directly really at all.

Another interpretation is that the path to improving a neighborhood is to raise the rent to the point that it causes the individuals that bring the index down to leave.
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Old 07-05-2011, 08:09 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hairmetal4ever View Post
So, basically, Cincy is getting crappier over time...as the nice neighborhood residents move out of city limits.
Actually, this has been a common characteristic to all gentrified neighborhoods in all cities.

Its what happens when neighborhoods that use to have a lot families get replaces by young professionals who want to live in the city. Since they are a sole person household, these neighborhoods that are gentrifying therefore drop in population numbers. Even empty nesters/retirees are the same way.

Unfortuntaly across the board, gentrifying urban neighborhoods are not going to be as appealing to families with children, because the people that have the most interest in living there, don't have children, and therefore don't care as much about the quality of public schools.
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Old 07-05-2011, 08:12 PM
 
Location: Cleveland Suburbs
2,554 posts, read 5,840,875 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by progmac View Post
Basically, no not at all. Of the different neighborhood types, only the nicest saw continual population decline; none of the three "lower" tiers saw the same decline. Basically it turns the idea of population decline = neighborhood decline on its head and THAT is why it was interesting. For example, today Oakley is smaller in population than in 1970 but much nicer.

You can have your thoughts but this study does not support them or speak to them directly really at all.
Which all falls into the famous gentrification stuff. Family dwellings of 4 or more are now being replaced with college-educated or folks with money, and that is now a household of 1, 2, or 3 at most. Gentrification will do that to population numbers
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