U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Ohio > Cincinnati
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 07-07-2011, 09:55 PM
 
Location: Cambridge, MA
4,730 posts, read 10,933,946 times
Reputation: 6450
Another classic (to me) Cincinnati house bites the dust.
Xavier University levels Theda Bara's former home | Cincinnati.com | cincinnati.com
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-08-2011, 03:43 AM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,363,536 times
Reputation: 1919
Other than the knowledge Theda Bara was a native Cincinnatian, does this have some particular significance? Added to the fact that back in her time income taxes were virtually nonexistent and the reason the money they earned went so far - a home in Cincinnati and also Hollywood.

I look at some of the historical and so-called preservation projects with the following viewpoint. It is true the architectural and workmanship qualities exist. But I have to think about the everyday tradesmen who created these structures and worked for abysmal wages in comparison. So in my opinion let the bulldozers roll.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-08-2011, 05:57 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
31,165 posts, read 57,302,589 times
Reputation: 52030
I saw that. What a waste, and what a complete dismissal of history.

Gives me another reason to hate XU.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill
But I have to think about the everyday tradesmen who created these structures and worked for abysmal wages in comparison. So in my opinion let the bulldozers roll.
Huh????
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-08-2011, 06:03 AM
 
1,130 posts, read 2,023,433 times
Reputation: 700
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
Other than the knowledge Theda Bara was a native Cincinnatian, does this have some particular significance? Added to the fact that back in her time income taxes were virtually nonexistent and the reason the money they earned went so far - a home in Cincinnati and also Hollywood.

I look at some of the historical and so-called preservation projects with the following viewpoint. It is true the architectural and workmanship qualities exist. But I have to think about the everyday tradesmen who created these structures and worked for abysmal wages in comparison. So in my opinion let the bulldozers roll.
You know, this is the attitude that contributes to the "sameness" of America. You keep on with your bulldozers, because every city in America will end up looking the same. It won't matter if you live in Cincinnati or Charlotte, NC, because everywhere will be the same cul-de-sac and the same strip mall.

Some people think that the only things worth saving have to be landmarks, but the shortsightedness of that makes me cringe. You have to look beyond individual structures, and think about the context of streets, neighborhoods, and even entire cities. Once you start loosing so-called "non-contributing" structures, your opportunity to preserve the over overall environmental context is gone for every. What you end up with are a few museum pieces that look woefully out of place and time. But there are some areas of the country that look at things differently. That's why the German Village in Columbus, Ohio is successful, that's why New Orleans, French Quarter is what it is, that's why Charleston, South Carolina is what it is.

Cincinnati doesn't get it in the least.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-08-2011, 06:08 AM
 
2,886 posts, read 3,951,520 times
Reputation: 1499
Quote:
Originally Posted by t45209 View Post
You know, this is the attitude that contributes to the "sameness" of America. You keep on with your bulldozers, because every city in America will end up looking the same. It won't matter if you live in Cincinnati or Charlotte, NC, because everywhere will be the same cul-de-sac and the same strip mall.

Some people think that the only things worth saving have to be landmarks, but the shortsightedness of that makes me cringe. You have to look beyond individual structures, and think about the context of streets, neighborhoods, and even entire cities. Once you start loosing so-called "non-contributing" structures, your opportunity to preserve the over overall environmental context is gone for every. What you end up with are a few museum pieces that look woefully out of place and time. But there are some areas of the country that look at things differently. That's why the German Village in Columbus, Ohio is successful, that's why New Orleans, French Quarter is what it is, that's why Charleston, South Carolina is what it is.

Cincinnati doesn't get it in the least.
This is, to my mind, the crucial case to be made for preservation. I can grasp the ignorance and greed involved in the destruction of the Gamble House, but something like what XU did yesterday is simply unconscionable. Or at least I thought it was. Obviously ignorance and greed are in evidence there, just on an institutional level. This one made me really sick.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-08-2011, 08:44 AM
 
149 posts, read 385,924 times
Reputation: 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by t45209 View Post
You know, this is the attitude that contributes to the "sameness" of America. You keep on with your bulldozers, because every city in America will end up looking the same. It won't matter if you live in Cincinnati or Charlotte, NC, because everywhere will be the same cul-de-sac and the same strip mall.

Some people think that the only things worth saving have to be landmarks, but the shortsightedness of that makes me cringe. You have to look beyond individual structures, and think about the context of streets, neighborhoods, and even entire cities. Once you start loosing so-called "non-contributing" structures, your opportunity to preserve the over overall environmental context is gone for every. What you end up with are a few museum pieces that look woefully out of place and time. But there are some areas of the country that look at things differently. That's why the German Village in Columbus, Ohio is successful, that's why New Orleans, French Quarter is what it is, that's why Charleston, South Carolina is what it is.

Cincinnati doesn't get it in the least.
Getting there with OTR
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-08-2011, 08:47 AM
 
Location: Chester County, PA
33 posts, read 61,274 times
Reputation: 31
Default Not quite Kind

The houses and buildings built many years ago are still of value, if not for anything other than a tribute to the skill of the builders.
I have an interest in who chose what in building style and also architectural details not seen in work today.

It is a pity that workers weren't paid well, but that doesn't diminish the value of their work. Look down south. Some of the most beautiful places were built by slaves and I for one, am glad when I see one still remaining. Try not to look at just the economic view but at the skill view.


Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
Other than the knowledge Theda Bara was a native Cincinnatian, does this have some particular significance? Added to the fact that back in her time income taxes were virtually nonexistent and the reason the money they earned went so far - a home in Cincinnati and also Hollywood.

I look at some of the historical and so-called preservation projects with the following viewpoint. It is true the architectural and workmanship qualities exist. But I have to think about the everyday tradesmen who created these structures and worked for abysmal wages in comparison. So in my opinion let the bulldozers roll.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-08-2011, 10:40 AM
 
2,492 posts, read 3,653,522 times
Reputation: 1385
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
Other than the knowledge Theda Bara was a native Cincinnatian, does this have some particular significance? Added to the fact that back in her time income taxes were virtually nonexistent and the reason the money they earned went so far - a home in Cincinnati and also Hollywood.

I look at some of the historical and so-called preservation projects with the following viewpoint. It is true the architectural and workmanship qualities exist. But I have to think about the everyday tradesmen who created these structures and worked for abysmal wages in comparison. So in my opinion let the bulldozers roll.
Sad.

And soooooooo Cincinnati.

Last edited by abr7rmj; 07-08-2011 at 10:53 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-08-2011, 10:41 PM
 
13,710 posts, read 22,832,449 times
Reputation: 18521
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
Other than the knowledge Theda Bara was a native Cincinnatian, does this have some particular significance? Added to the fact that back in her time income taxes were virtually nonexistent and the reason the money they earned went so far - a home in Cincinnati and also Hollywood.

I have seen hundreds of silent films over the years and I can honestly say that I had never heard of Theda Bara.

A little research yielded that she appeared in 44 films, nearly all between 1914-1919. Of the 44 films, only three have survived in their entirety and fragments of several other.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-09-2011, 05:17 AM
 
Location: Cambridge, MA
4,730 posts, read 10,933,946 times
Reputation: 6450
My dad put himself through the night/weekend grinder to earn his MBA at Xavier when I was in elementary school. There were some Saturday mornings when I decided to ride along and chill while he attended a class or turned in work. I always liked seeing the Theda Bara house, partly because that "Southwestern" style of home architecture with the stucco exterior walls and tile roof isn't very common in Cincinnati. The house also fit its lot well, managing to "own" the southeast corner of Victory Parkway and Ledgewood without overwhelming it. It was also pleasant and safe to stroll around the immediate area, taking in the streetscape of mature shade trees and all the 2.5-story brick dwellings which still exist in large numbers around Evanston, Westwood, etc. (And - an aside - another Cincy institution lost to time and "progress" was just down the block on Herald Ave. The olfactories used to sing joyously to my brain when catching generous whiffs of the baking going on at Wonder Bread. )

My folks have a soft spot for trivia - and passed it on to me - so I knew early on about Theda Bara and her "vamp" persona. I once saw an iconic photo of her in full flapper regalia sitting on a large thronelike chair, which may have been a still from one of her movies. People have probably been stirred to open vintage clothing/accessory stores after seeing pics like that, it was that cool. One can easily imagine what house parties at that villa must've been like.

Last month, when I attended a graduation ceremony at Cintas Center (which stands near or maybe even at where Wonder Bread once did) we arrived by turning left on Asmann - snicker - from Victory Parkway and then approaching from another access road. Had the Theda Bara house demo not been a surprise "shock and awe" operation I would've demanded to be taken by it. Now of course it's too late to enjoy seeing that landmark. And with all the campus expansion and reconstruction going on most of the stretch of Ledgewood between Victory Parkway and Dana has been obliterated or altered too.

Attempts have been made in the cincinnati.com blog to justify this stealth operation in part by asserting that pieces of the house had been saved to include in future buildings as a way of "historical recognition." That's the same story which circulated when the RKO Albee Theater downtown got knocked down in favor of that architectural gem the Westin. One lil' piece of the gorgeous old movie house got uncomfortably grafted onto the facade of the convention center. And now some lil' pieces of an attractive old home once owned by a movie actress may get uncomfortably grafted onto walls of a concrete-or-brick and glass box containing classrooms or offices. How nice.

There had to have been a lottery to decide which Muskies got to live in what'd been converted to an honors student house. For as blindly as XU decided to remove it, the renovation had been done well from all accounts. All the details of the place were preserved, which meant among other things that you could eye Rookwoodtiles while showering instead of your typical everyday dull walls. (One can easily imagine what those house parties must've looked like too. ) It seems to me, also, that it would've been a selling point for marketing the school to prospective freshmen.

It's no surprise that the demo was a surprise. The CPA and plenty of individuals would've raised heII and perhaps ultimately stopped it.
Gotta hand it to Xavier and Cincinnati. Yet again the whole world is watching and laughing (though sardonically this time.)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Ohio > Cincinnati
Similar Threads
View detailed profiles of:
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top