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Old 07-12-2011, 08:59 AM
 
5 posts, read 7,136 times
Reputation: 10

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Thanks for the info everyone. To clarify, I am the one looking to move somewhere new...my husband is happy with his current job...but when I bring up looking for some place to move, he always falls back on Cincinnati being the 'easiest' place to get transferred to. I just think we're young and like adventure, so we should take advantage of the opportunities that we have available to us and try living someplace new.

And I know we're asking for too many things that don't fit together well...currently we live in a great house on a large lot, but we don't have the walkable neighborhood which I am craving. If we do start a family, I'd at least want to live close enough for the kids to be able to walk to school.

The comment about "conservativism does pretty much pervade the overall local culture" is what is making me cautious about moving...but I'm still thinking about it. I'll have to work on my husband about compromising on the age of the home...we don't need that much space as long as we have privacy. Thanks for your suggestions!
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Old 07-12-2011, 09:17 AM
 
41 posts, read 65,158 times
Reputation: 33
You should check out Northside. It has the walkability and coffee shop/restaurant/live music atmosphere you are seeking. It's predominantly older houses, but there are a number of new home developments, including a few with green credentials.
Moderator cut: please wait with posting links till you have at least 10 posts

Strong community, lots of young people, surrounded by woods, all less than 10 mins from downtown.

And it's cheap! With your budget you could buy a brand new house, an old industrial building for your husband, and have money left over for the nice restaurants.

You could live here while you figured it all out: Moderator cut: please wait with posting links till you have at least 10 posts

Last edited by Yac; 07-13-2011 at 03:21 AM..
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Old 07-12-2011, 09:26 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
3,335 posts, read 5,755,013 times
Reputation: 2058
P&G is one of the largest companies in the world, as you know, and they along with many other similar-tier companies are headquartered here. so there will be plenty of people just like those that your husband works with now. whether that is good or bad depends on your perspective.
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Old 07-12-2011, 10:42 AM
 
5 posts, read 5,866 times
Reputation: 12
As an outsider that's recently done this, I'll say the following:
1) You're the right demographic to move here. Cincinnati is absolutely awful to be single in, but good to great to be a young couple/family in
2) Hyde Park. You want to move to Hyde Park. Near the Square. It's walkable, upscale-ish, good for families, and pretty cheap
3) Overall Cincinnati isn't a walkable city, not if you're used to something like NYC, SanFran, Seattle, Boston, Chicago, etc., but it sounds like you aren't. If you truly want walkability do not come here. The Downtown area is about 4 square blocks, much of which closes when the courthouse closes. The rest of Cincinnati has small areas of commerce to walk to but you won't go a single day without getting behind the wheel of a car. This has been my biggest disappointment
4) Do NOT eat Skyline. Do not listen to what everyone says. It's just fast food, and not particularly good fast food. If you must eat it get as little cheese as possible - they load those things up with about six inches of the fakest, cheapest cheese. Also, Graeter's is just ice cream. There, I said it, I'll now duck all the tomatoes sure to be thrown at me
5) Restaurants are iffy here. They charge Chicago prices but tend not to offer Chicago quality. There are some standout exceptions and you'll learn them quickly. Few have significant waits, and many offer outdoor dining that this time of year screams for

I would not consider this a place to go long term. I know that's going to make me incredibly unpopular here. But it's a place to very quickly advance a career. If you are looking for adventure you can do worse than two years here. Your husband's career will be helped and you'll see something new. But if you want a true city lifestyle you won't find it here. This is a very large small town.
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Old 07-12-2011, 11:30 AM
 
2,886 posts, read 3,972,543 times
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Move here, and you'll hear a lot more of the type of comment you just got from Wilson.

Upon reflection, though, a lot of people who end up here more or less involuntarily eventually decide that even against their better judgment, they love the place. Combining what you've said about your situation with MY life experience, I think you and your husband should give Cincinnati a try. But don't buy a house right away. Head for a nice rental in one of the young professional magnet neighborhoods like Hyde Park, Mt. Lookout, Oakley or Pleasant Ridge. Give it a year or two. By then you'll know if you love it or hate it here. Hold off on starting the family long enough to decide if this is a good area to raise kids. If you decide it is, you may well want to head for the 'burbs and buy a newish house on a largish lot, where the school systems don't present the problems and challenges that Cincinnati Public (which serves all the neighborhoods I mentioned) does.

The beauty of being young--or even youngish--is that you don't have to do it all at once.
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Old 07-12-2011, 11:41 AM
 
2,492 posts, read 3,669,479 times
Reputation: 1385
Wow, Dantown12, thanks for joining city-data this month to trash Cincinnati. However, I can confidently say that you're absolutely wrong in most all of your "observations."

1. This is a tired generalization and really isn't all that true. If you try to meet people in bars, chances are you're not going to be too successful, no matter what city you're in. There are plenty of other ways to meet people.
2. Hyde Park isn't all that cheap.
3. Cincinnati can be a walkable city, depending on where you live. If you live in Hyde Park or downtown, you can easily go days without driving your car. Downtown is significantly bigger than four blocks. And unless the courthouse closes after 2 a.m. on most nights, you're wrong in your assumption there too. Fountain Square, the restaurant/club area around the Aronoff, Main Street and increasingly The Banks are quite alive and active well into the night.
4. People can choose to eat what they want. Pick your favorite restaurant: Some people love it, some people hate it. The fact that you don't like Skyline doesn't really mean anything.
5. Cincinnati has a wide selection of local establishments and national chains. You'll find plenty that you like, I'm sure.

And you definitely can find a true city lifestyle here. Dantown12 couldn't be more wrong there. The fact that some consider it a large small town is one of its endearing charms to a lot of people and it's nothing to criticize Cincinnati for. And Sarah Perry couldn't be more right: You very well may end up loving it here.

Good luck!
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Old 07-12-2011, 02:13 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
3,335 posts, read 5,755,013 times
Reputation: 2058
i rarely use my car during the week. YMMV of course. bus to work, daily items at the walgreens, and ice cream plus three restaurants, one coffee shop, some retail, two parks, and a library in walking distance. at the same time, i wouldn't be without one because parking is easy everywhere and grocery stores are boxy and parking-lot oriented for the most part. plus they don't let you walk through the drive-through.

dan is right that outsiders don't usually like the chili. i'll take non-vegetarian guests to a local chili parlor where they can get a hamburger or something more familiar.

sarah's comment about people "more or less...involuntarily...deciding they love the place." is a phenomenon that i have witnessed among transplants. it was unexpected to see it put into words, so thanks for that Sarah.

it's funny: there are some places people move where they start out forcing themselves to love it and realize it isn't a good fit and other places where people move they start out thinking it isn't a good fit and realize they love it.

Last edited by progmac; 07-12-2011 at 02:28 PM..
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Old 07-12-2011, 09:08 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati, OH
2 posts, read 2,350 times
Reputation: 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by abr7rmj View Post
However, I can confidently say that you're absolutely wrong in most all of your "observations."
+1

Having lived here for over 30 years I too can tell you the Dan12 is incorrect.

First of all downtown is easily more than 4 blocks. If you've never ventured beyond 4 blocks you haven't seen much of downtown.

Most conservatively it stretches from Central Parkway (north) to the Ohio river (south) to Eggelston (east) (where the new casino will be)) to Central Avenue (west). My guess that is 10 or 15 blocks in each direction and if you include Over the Rhine (which most folks do) that's another 10 or 15 blocks in each direction.

I agree with everything ABR7RMJ has to say about the city.

To me Cincinnati is what you make it. It's the kind of place where if something you like to do isn't happening, you can make it happen (if you're so inclined).

Your requirements for a home are virtually impossible, a new house with that kind of land, in the city, at that price? Good luck!

I live in a 'burb between Cincinnati and Dayton that meets your requirements and I paid about half of what you're looking spend.
I can be anywhere from Cincinnati to Dayton to Northern KY in 45 minutes.

I have seen the darkest days here and I have seen several revivals. I can honestly say I have never seen one like the one that currently underway.

I would say visit here, get a feel for the city. Spend sometime in the neighborhoods. There are many. Talk to the people, you'll find them to be open, honest, diverse and friendly.

And if you don't like Skyline Chili, try Goldstar...
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Old 07-12-2011, 10:00 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati, OH
2 posts, read 2,350 times
Reputation: 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by pbertin View Post
The comment about "conservativism does pretty much pervade the overall local culture" is what is making me cautious about moving...but I'm still thinking about it...
Cincinnati has a reputation for conservatism, but so does much of the Midwest.

It's not New York or LA, but it's 180 degrees from where it used to be.

As an example the biggest event in the city last weekend was the Gay Pride weekend (Equinox Cincinnati) which started on Friday and ended Sunday.
About as far from conservative as you can be...

With a new street car system and casino coming on-line in the next couple of years, the Banks project, a new football stadium and baseball stadium, the new Great American Building on the skyline, one of the top high schools in the nation (Walnut Hills High #25 iirc) and two world class universities, not to mention the largest employer (P&G), this city has much to offer...
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Old 07-13-2011, 08:07 AM
 
Location: Oxford, Ohio
901 posts, read 1,960,954 times
Reputation: 691
I'm going to echo Kitnguye and Sarah Perry. Unfortunately everything you're wanting poses a huge problem for Cincinnati, and I think we've all seen this before on these message boards....people wanting things that are simply very hard to find in this area. You're going to need to prioritize your wishlist into things you absolutely MUST have, and what you may be willing to sacrifice in order to have those things. You're not going to find a walkable neighborhood loaded with coffee shops, restaurants and parks with new homes in your price range unless you go out to one of those suburban sprawl areas that you want to avoid. If you DO want the walkable neighborhood and coffee shops, etc - minus the big box suburban sprawl stuff - you're going to be in an area that doesn't have newer homes.

Such is the reality of the Cincinnati region. It really isn't such a place to dread, so I hope you'll be able to open your mind a bit and give it a shot. You may find more to like about it than you realize.
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