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Old 07-14-2011, 12:31 PM
 
10,139 posts, read 22,456,274 times
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^^^ Every member of my family except for me lived at one time in Chicago and I spent every wedding, funeral and holiday there until I was an adult with children and one thing for sure. Chicagoans have no idea what is at the Art Institute. OK, many Chicagoans support sports teams, big deal. We have bad teams too. But cultural events? You have to be kidding.

In my little neighborhood in Cincinnati, there are 62 restaurants I can walk to. And most are not even crowded. To say there is a variety of choices would be a ricidulous understatement. OK, in your neighborhood in Chicago you may have 100 instead of 62 choices. Is that better?

And the city neighborhood where I live is 5 miles from the center of the City (about 1/2 as far as Oak Park is from the Loop), takes 10 minutes to get to work and park, and it is far better and more family friendly than it was in the 40's 60's or 80's.
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Old 07-14-2011, 12:58 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
477 posts, read 530,672 times
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Quote:
Chicagoans have no idea what is at the Art Institute. OK, many Chicagoans support sports teams, big deal. We have bad teams too. But cultural events? You have to be kidding.
It depends on the circle your in honestly. Cultural events happen in every hood to some extent. I was biking around Wicker Park and randomly ran into an outdoor fashion show. Next weekend there is a large indie music festival. Sure these aren't old traditional arts like the Arts Institute or Opera to pop out at you all the time, but I have friends who've invited me to avant garde dance shows. Go to a local coffee house and you can find any event imaginable. Film festivals and special film events happen all the time at the Music Box, Siskel Film Center or Doc Films at UChicago (which is something that Cincy is really lacking on mainly due to the attitude of the guy who runs the Esquire and Mariemont theaters). There even is an MPAA associated theater the Century for the types of pseudo art films the Esquire usually shows (it picks up a few more because Chicago is part of the "cool kids" club of cities - something Cincy should aspire to be part of). There is also a ton of off Broadway theaters, the second largest in the US after NYC. Cincinnati's definition of culture is old (which is cool) but for newer cutting edge stuff you can find a lot more of it in Chicago.

However there is, one institution Cincy has over Chicago: Newport Aquarium blows Shedd out of the water (pun intended ). Shedd may have a larger collection of animals, but Newport is so much better designed that I was unimpressed. Also there is no equivalent neighborhood to OTR if OTR were to be fully gentrified. Its either less densely built urban enviornments (denser populations though) or areas with newer highrises and courtyard apartments. No old rowhouse style 'hood that quite has the character and quality of old architecture of OTR.
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Old 07-14-2011, 01:30 PM
 
10,139 posts, read 22,456,274 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by neilworms2 View Post
It depends on the circle your in honestly. Cultural events happen in every hood to some extent. I was biking around Wicker Park and randomly ran into an outdoor fashion show. Next weekend there is a large indie music festival. Sure these aren't old traditional arts like the Arts Institute or Opera to pop out at you all the time, but I have friends who've invited me to avant garde dance shows. Go to a local coffee house and you can find any event imaginable. Film festivals and special film events happen all the time at the Music Box, Siskel Film Center or Doc Films at UChicago (which is something that Cincy is really lacking on mainly due to the attitude of the guy who runs the Esquire and Mariemont theaters). There even is an MPAA associated theater the Century for the types of pseudo art films the Esquire usually shows (it picks up a few more because Chicago is part of the "cool kids" club of cities - something Cincy should aspire to be part of). There is also a ton of off Broadway theaters, the second largest in the US after NYC. Cincinnati's definition of culture is old (which is cool) but for newer cutting edge stuff you can find a lot more of it in Chicago.

However there is, one institution Cincy has over Chicago: Newport Aquarium blows Shedd out of the water (pun intended ). Shedd may have a larger collection of animals, but Newport is so much better designed that I was unimpressed. Also there is no equivalent neighborhood to OTR if OTR were to be fully gentrified. Its either less densely built urban enviornments (denser populations though) or areas with newer highrises and courtyard apartments. No old rowhouse style 'hood that quite has the character and quality of old architecture of OTR.
Shedd has a really nice institutional feel that Newport does not have. Sure the tunnels are unique and the penguins are superior, but overall, I have much more affection for the Sheed (Having been there 15 times or so). And, the Art Institute is second only, IMO to the National Gallery.

An amatuer like me would not see the difference in the Cincinnati Symphony, Ballet or the Art Museums compared with Chicago's equivalents. Food is unequaled in Chicago. Chicagoans know how to eat and demand not only good food but lots of it.
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Old 07-14-2011, 02:09 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
477 posts, read 530,672 times
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Food is unequaled in Chicago. Chicagoans know how to eat and demand not only good food but lots of it.
Other than what I said about Indian food, completely agreed! (looks at ever expanding gut)

Quote:
An amatuer like me would not see the difference in the Cincinnati Symphony, Ballet or the Art Museums compared with Chicago's equivalents.
Yeah I'm sure that there isn't too much difference in those institutions, as they were founded when Cincy was one of the largest cities in the country and still punch way above their weight. In terms of new art like cinema that's a different story
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Old 07-14-2011, 02:48 PM
 
Location: Kentucky
2,927 posts, read 7,402,499 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by insightofitall View Post
Call me stupid, but I've honestly been trying to think of what word you're talking about, and it's just not coming to me. Can you give a different hint? LOL!
I think it's "shuck." Umm, maybe?

A common name for Charles is Chuck right?
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Old 07-14-2011, 02:55 PM
 
2,886 posts, read 3,959,331 times
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Originally Posted by insightofitall View Post
Call me stupid, but I've honestly been trying to think of what word you're talking about, and it's just not coming to me. Can you give a different hint? LOL!
haha. I didn't do very well. I think this will be a lot simpler and pass the filter. Start with the "sh," then add "muck." Seriously, I'm positive I've heard the word used on Seinfeld or something. This place is stricter than network TV?
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Old 07-14-2011, 03:03 PM
 
2,886 posts, read 3,959,331 times
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Other than the fact that I grew up here--which made it kind of a logical, easy place to retire to--for me living in Cincinnati comes down to simple economics. I'd hugely prefer to live in San Francisco or Minneapolis/St. Paul or Boston or a bunch of other places. But in most of those places, I'd have to live in a 700 square foot apartment instead of the newish, medium size house on a large, wooded lot in a quiet subdivision where I live now. And I wouldn't be able to afford most of the more expensive cultural amenities in those places, anyway. As it is, Cincinnati offers me MOST of the things I consider important. But obviously, if it were actually in a class with cities with a much higher cost of living, it would, well, have a much higher cost of living.

Yes, Cincinnati could be something more than it is. But not until it cleans itself up, both physicially and governmentally. I honestly don't see more than a bit of incremental progress on either front in my lifetime.
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Old 07-14-2011, 09:03 PM
 
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Honestly, some great neighborhoods to consider would be some like Mariemont or Madiera. In these neighborhoods you would find homes that are with in your price range from more older tudors to new modern subdivisions and homes off of it. Also, with started a family soon, both of these neighborhoods feature excellent school systems ranked very high in the state of Ohio let alone the country. Mariemont for example, has a nice warm family feel with people walking and jogging in the middle of the night. Little coffee shops and restaurants dot the town center. The focal point of the center is a lovely fountain. The residents ages are typically average maybe not young but not old. Hyde Park, Mount Lookout, and Mount Adams tend to have more of an influx of younger people. These areas are generally affluent but don't carry accredited schools with them. Hyde Park will have typically older homes but the others newer.
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Old 07-14-2011, 11:46 PM
 
405 posts, read 754,662 times
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Originally Posted by Wilson513 View Post

In my little neighborhood in Cincinnati, there are 62 restaurants I can walk to. And most are not even crowded.
Well, we all know where you live, but I guess you'd have to clarify how far you are willing to walk. Please exclude pizzerias and explain how you get to 62. The closest ones would presumably be on Erie in "East" Hyde park and there are about five there. If you stroll further down to Mt Lookout Square there are about 8 more. I suppose you could hike down to Hyde Park Square and there are about 8 more there.

If you walk to Hyde Park Shopping center I take my hat off to you. You can get another ten restaurants there.

If you are including Rookwood and Madison road in your 62 "walkables" I really think you are stretching the point.

Maybe you are being very "lawyerly" with your I "can" walk vs. whether you actually do or whether the average person would.

Nonetheless most of the restaurants are only average in quality compared to what you can get in, for example Boston or San Francisco. (The so called sushi served here is really depressing, for example. The seafood of course cannot compare. Vegetarian? Of course they have trouble surviving here.) The diversity is also lacking, although I was happy with the Saigon Cafe that just opened in terms of decent Vietnamese.

I think Cincinnati offers a pretty good Orchestra, it has a 4 production ballet season, its got a great free Art Museum. There is plenty of culture and stuff here but of course its just not at the level of the big cities. Those big cities also happen to be incredibly expensive to own property in and to eat etc in.
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Old 07-15-2011, 12:40 AM
 
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Hehehe. Of course we are talking about Hyde Park, aren't we. And, I live in Mt. Lookout these days. 62 is the number I count from HP Square. Actually its a higher number from where I live in Mt. Lookout. When you say that you take your hat off to me if I walk to the HP Shopping Center. Its actually less than a mile to the center of the HP Shopping Center so I am not sure why that is surprising unless you are making a catty reference to my deplorable physical condition.

I walk by Cumin, Amarin, and Bankok Bistro, China Gourmet (best Chinese Restaurant anywhere-they only give four stars to any Chinese place, look it up), two pizzarias, a burger place (soon to open again). And, when I get there, there is the Kroger Deli, First Wok, Fugi, Brueggers, El toro, Shaan India, McDonalds, City Barbeque, Jersey Mikes, Panera, Fridays, Daybreak, India HP, Chipoltle, Mio's, Taco Casa, Noodles, Green Papaya, Blue Elephant, McMurphy's.

That covers East HP and the Plaza, to say nothing of HP Square, Mt. Lookout Square and Rookwood Commons (five blocks from the Square), all of which are walkable even though I live at the absolute last house at the eastern edge of HP.

I am sure I missed a few above and there may be a couple in transition. But I count that at 28, not 10 in East HP alone. And as for the quality, I think the list speaks for itself. I did include Papa Johns and McDonalds neither of which are on my "must eat" list. But one could pick from those 28 and never go anywhere else, I would say. I am pretty sure there are 10-12 more open these days in Mt. Lookout Square. You numbers for HP Square and Rookwood are off about the same as they are off for the Plaza. Just sayin'.

Last edited by Wilson513; 07-15-2011 at 01:05 AM..
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