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Old 12-14-2011, 04:47 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati (Norwood)
3,383 posts, read 3,700,837 times
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CinciFan--thank you for the two eye-opening graphs; what about either is there not to understand nor to appreciate?
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Old 12-14-2011, 06:14 AM
 
2,886 posts, read 3,954,293 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CinciFan View Post
Still looking. Found these along the way and thought they were interesting.
They certainly are interesting.

Last week I made my annual trip to Lexington, where I still participate in a long-term medical study. I always spend a day just driving around town. The amount of new development there, both commercial and residential, is astounding compared to what I see on a day-to-day basis here. For the most part, the community looks quite prosperous. Clean and well-maintained. Sort of a whole urban area that resembles Blue Ash or Montgomery in term of apparent financial resources.

It set me to mulling on the theory that our national trend of bifurcation into extreme "haves" and extreme "have-nots" with a drastically smaller middle class may be happening more and more on a community level, too.
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Old 12-14-2011, 06:16 AM
 
2,886 posts, read 3,954,293 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CinciFan View Post
Found it. The cost of the Banks streetcar spur will cost $9 million.

Cincinnati to break ground on smaller streetcar starter route this fall UrbanCincy
Thank you. Although it's not new news, it's the type of source I was looking for.
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Old 12-14-2011, 06:41 AM
 
405 posts, read 754,055 times
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I guess its all been said many times, but why don't they just build some custom buses to look like street cars, and outfit them so they can only go 20 miles per hour max.

Then just drive them slowly up and down the original long route, ringing a bell every block or so? You could have your street car in a few months. And they would go from uptown to downtown.

Why does the streetcar, in other words, have to run on rails?
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Old 12-14-2011, 07:20 AM
 
2,886 posts, read 3,954,293 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wolden View Post
I guess its all been said many times, but why don't they just build some custom buses to look like street cars, and outfit them so they can only go 20 miles per hour max.

Then just drive them slowly up and down the original long route, ringing a bell every block or so? You could have your street car in a few months. And they would go from uptown to downtown.

Why does the streetcar, in other words, have to run on rails?
Just as baffled as you are. It would seem, at least, like something rational to try for a couple years to find out if ridership even approaches the level that is assumed for the streetcars.
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Old 12-14-2011, 08:30 AM
 
2,492 posts, read 3,655,718 times
Reputation: 1385
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sarah Perry View Post
They certainly are interesting.

Last week I made my annual trip to Lexington, where I still participate in a long-term medical study. I always spend a day just driving around town. The amount of new development there, both commercial and residential, is astounding compared to what I see on a day-to-day basis here. For the most part, the community looks quite prosperous. Clean and well-maintained. Sort of a whole urban area that resembles Blue Ash or Montgomery in term of apparent financial resources.

It set me to mulling on the theory that our national trend of bifurcation into extreme "haves" and extreme "have-nots" with a drastically smaller middle class may be happening more and more on a community level, too.
I like Lexington, like the vibe it has downtown and definitely love going to the area around UK (I went to school there for one year) whenever I'm in town. But that being said, I don't understand how you perceive mass development there but not here. I don't see any new skyscraper going up in Lexington like we've had in the last two years; I don't see anything like The Banks, the Central Riverfront Park; the new Rookwood Exchange (about to start construction); Washington Park; 21c/Metropole; the casino; Mercer Commons; Vine Street; streetcar, etc.

A lot of Lexington's well-deserved development is around the UK campus, and that's to be expected but it's nothing different than what you see at OSU or UC and Xavier here. Just two days ago came word that the long-awaited Clifton Heights U-Square project will break ground next month. That will bring even more new residential and retail into the city.

So, in short, I'm not getting how you don't see "astounding" development going on in and around Cincinnati. Frankly, Lexington would have a seriously hard time matching the projects that we have going on here.

Last edited by abr7rmj; 12-14-2011 at 08:42 AM..
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Old 12-14-2011, 08:37 AM
 
Location: Cleveland Suburbs
2,554 posts, read 5,839,327 times
Reputation: 619
Quote:
Originally Posted by CinciFan View Post
Still looking. Found these along the way and thought they were interesting.


Great graphs!

Proves to everyone who is against the "toy train" that it is a hell of a lot more than that. People in Cincinnati do not realize how important this is, and quicky downgrade it. Cincinnati could have received all the money from the federal government (over $500 million, right?) and people still would find some way to be negative about the streetcar coming into town. Wait until it is finished and these people can shut up then.

Cincinnati is currently spending billions in projects across the city, and known as a city on the comeback and great gentrification projects; the streetcar will only link all of this and start even more investment. That population graph of Cincinnati speaks volumes. The negative people haven't done anything but talk down on Cincinnati, but are quick to downgrade any progressive movements by the city... what's that say? I haven't seen them do anything for decades, and now a new front has come along, and they are shi***** bricks!
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Old 12-14-2011, 08:44 AM
 
Location: Cleveland Suburbs
2,554 posts, read 5,839,327 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sarah Perry View Post
They certainly are interesting.

Last week I made my annual trip to Lexington, where I still participate in a long-term medical study. I always spend a day just driving around town. The amount of new development there, both commercial and residential, is astounding compared to what I see on a day-to-day basis here. For the most part, the community looks quite prosperous. Clean and well-maintained. Sort of a whole urban area that resembles Blue Ash or Montgomery in term of apparent financial resources.

It set me to mulling on the theory that our national trend of bifurcation into extreme "haves" and extreme "have-nots" with a drastically smaller middle class may be happening more and more on a community level, too.
I am at my office and browsed CD and had to post just because of this post.

I seriously hope you're joking. Lexington doesn't even have anything like the amount of development going on in Cincy, let alone something like Mercer Commons or Washington Park. Forget the bigger projects going on across Cincinnati. I mean if the construction of a new Applebees is your thing, than I can see why you would think that is great news! And considering the people who live in the suburbs and talk down on Cincinnati in this forum, I am not surprised why seeing Lexington development is great news to them.

Downtown Lexington is scattered with surface lots. Drive along High Street and Vine and look at the parking lots that literally are next to the center of downtown aka Main Street.

Lexington is huge in area because it does the Uni Gov thing, and doesn't have the dense historic districts even close to what Cincinnati has. I can't even think of MAJOR cities that have the development dollars being spent like Cincinnati does. I guess you REALLY have to travel to understand this.
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Old 12-14-2011, 08:47 AM
 
Location: Cleveland Suburbs
2,554 posts, read 5,839,327 times
Reputation: 619
Also, I may add that nice grass patch where CentrePoint was suppose to go is something I would expect in Grand Island, Nebraska. They could have at least turned it into a park...
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Old 12-14-2011, 08:59 AM
 
2,492 posts, read 3,655,718 times
Reputation: 1385
Quote:
Originally Posted by Traveler87 View Post
I am at my office and browsed CD and had to post just because of this post.

I seriously hope you're joking. Lexington doesn't even have anything like the amount of development going on in Cincy, let alone something like Mercer Commons or Washington Park. Forget the bigger projects going on across Cincinnati. I mean if the construction of a new Applebees is your thing, than I can see why you would think that is great news! And considering the people who live in the suburbs and talk down on Cincinnati in this forum, I am not surprised why seeing Lexington development is great news to them.

Downtown Lexington is scattered with surface lots. Drive along High Street and Vine and look at the parking lots that literally are next to the center of downtown aka Main Street.

Lexington is huge in area because it does the Uni Gov thing, and doesn't have the dense historic districts even close to what Cincinnati has. I can't even think of MAJOR cities that have the development dollars being spent like Cincinnati does. I guess you REALLY have to travel to understand this.
I suspect that's a lot of what she's seeing (new Applebee's, Jimmy Johns, Buffalo Wild Wings, etc. mostly in the campus area) and she's perceiving it to be "astounding new development," which it really isn't. And she's not acknowledging or giving credit to the billions of dollars worth of development currently under way, recently completed or shovel-ready here.

It's one of those "Sooooooo Cincinnati" attitudes: Assume everywhere else is just inherently better than here. I have zero doubt that should Lexington or Indianapolis be putting in a streetcar line and Cincinnati wasn't, the same people that criticize it now would be lauding those cities for their foresight and bemoaning our inaction here.

Last edited by abr7rmj; 12-14-2011 at 09:20 AM..
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