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Old 08-03-2011, 05:06 PM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,395,175 times
Reputation: 1920

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Wilson... And I for one would not want to live in Hyde Park or Mt Lookout. Wyoming at least has a long history of doing for itself, good schools, pleasant surroundings, nice people. That is a lot more than you can say for the City as a whole. Faulting people for living there to me is just petty.

Since when are Madison Rd, Observatory, Erie and Delta Avenues models of tranquility? They were examples of urban blight 50 years ago when I traveled them to UC and still are. The off streets on the hills having the large homes with river views are the only reason this area is still decent to live in, similar to Clifton and North Avondale. The overaged and overpriced apartments which line the main roads are a throwback. Like going to visit England and staying in a storied hotel just to find out it doesn't have air conditioning or for that matter even decent hot water for a shower. Even the newest shopping center Rookwood Commons is in Norwood, not Hyde Park. The only thing I can see the area has to offer is relative safety as long as you do not stray too far.

Now if you have a determined reason to live close to the Inner City, and I will bet a business/job/financial reason comes into play, then both Wyoming and Hyde Park/Mt. Lookout come into play. But in my case I have no such reason. Lord and behold my former company sold their property in Norwood where Rookwood Commons is now located and moved to Mason where they could acquire land and build a start-of-the-art facility for what they got for the land in Norwood. Best day in my life. I went from a long distance commute, as I had moved to Mason earlier, to a less than 1 mile trip.

For those who say the City is the spark for business, I say BS. Just look around at how many businesses have decided to locate out in the suburbs. Of course tax abatements and the rest come into play. But I also feel the knowledge their employees can get desirable housing in the immediate area means a lot.
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Old 08-03-2011, 05:19 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati near
2,511 posts, read 3,363,879 times
Reputation: 5621
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wilson513 View Post
Wyoming has all of the negatives a residential area could have: busy Xway spewing pollution and noise, busy railroad, the most polluted stream in the US, sits on a valley floor, no real amenities, surrounded by problematic neighborhoods.

I can't imagine why anyone would want to live there if they didn't grow up in Wyoming.

Change "Wyoming" to "Lockland" and I would mostly agree with you. Only the lower third of Wyoming really sits in the valley, and the Mill Creek is along the border, not running right through. Clearly, though, the western side of Wyoming up on top of the hill is more affluent, but all of Wyoming has a lot more of the walking/biking neighborhood feel than comparable neighborhoods way out in the suburbs.
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Old 08-03-2011, 05:25 PM
 
33 posts, read 88,134 times
Reputation: 23
Default Why I would (do) want to live in Wyoming

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wilson513 View Post
Wyoming has all of the negatives a residential area could have: busy Xway spewing pollution and noise, busy railroad, the most polluted stream in the US, sits on a valley floor, no real amenities, surrounded by problematic neighborhoods.

I can't imagine why anyone would want to live there if they didn't grow up in Wyoming.
Well, I did decide to live there and I didn't grow up there. I will be moving from the Boston area to my new home in Wyoming in September.

I don't think the reasons why I want to live there will shock you, as they are cited in almost every single thread about Wyoming. Nevertheless, I will go through the exercise of stating why I wanted to live there, in case such a thing is of value to other people reading CD.

1) Top notch public schools, without a) the complications of needing to "test in" to a good school (why Hyde Park living/Walnut Hills HS schooling was less attractive to me personally -- although I know that place is great and all and many think it's the bee's knees), or b) the extreme concern for overprivileged social climbing based on wealth that seems to come up (accurately or inaccurately) whenever the Indian Hill school district is mentioned. I make no claim as to the veracity of how this applies to IH schools, and I acknowledge I may be overvaluing impressions of people who know not of what they speak. Regardless, the possiblity it would be true seems plausible and aversive enough to make Indian Hill less attractive to me personally.
2) Closer to where my wife and I will be working (Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center) than places we considered in e.g. the Sycamore School district, although those were perfectly nice
3) Slightly less homogeneity than some other places (I understand this is only incremental, but it was a factor for us -- see Terrace Park demographics vs Wyoming demographics; Terrace Park is 99.3% white and Wyoming is 83.6% white). We seriously considered Terrace Park, which is lovely, but thought we'd find more more non-white faces in Wyoming (a plus for us) AND have more in common with our neighbors in Wyoming than in TP. Mind you, I have zero interest in slagging TP, which is truly lovely, nor to imply anything bad about the people who live there. But I mention this to try to answer the question, "Why Wyoming?"
4) The departments my wife and I will be working for put us in contact with people who lived in Wyoming and loved it and what we heard was consistent with what we heard elsewhere about what it was like to live and raise a family there
5) Relative stability of property value
6) We could afford the kind of residence we will be comfortable in, in a neighborhood with other kids, but also greenery
7) The only people who seem to raise concern about the neighborhoods surrounding Wyoming and how that might affect safety are those who know the least about Wyoming, and no one who lives there ever seems to have those concerns
8) Nobody, not even once, ever raised any concern about the water or pollution with the exception of Wilson513, who does so repeatedly, and with great vigor. FYI, Wilson, my future house is nowhere near any expressways.

Potential downsides to Wyoming we considered:
1) Somewhat older housing stock
2) Lack of selection of houses we liked in our price range at the particular time we were looking
3) Lack of walkability to a commercial center with much in the way of restaurants, ice cream shops, etc
4) Lack of walkability of the house we settled on to an elementary school, a park suitable for young children, the library, or a pool (although these are all close by and easily accessible by car)

Note that others making a list would have downsides that weren't significant for us. The price of houses in Wyoming is high relative to much of Cincinnati, but not relative to other areas we were considering. I cannot stumble home from a bar after a night of carousing, but that is not what I'm looking for in a community, and after having lived in (and tired of) areas in which that is a hallmark of the neighborhood culture, it holds no appeal for me. In no way, shape, or form, does Wyoming seem like urban living. And so on for factors others might consider important in choosing a community for themselves...

In the end, the positives outweighed the negatives for us. Ergo, we are happy soon-to-be Wyomingites. My expectation is that in Wyoming we will find a welcoming, cohesive community that supports things we value -- among them the value of education and artistic and musical pursuits. I sincerely doubt my expectations will be disappointed and certainly nothing has come to my attention to call this into question.
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Old 08-03-2011, 05:40 PM
 
10,139 posts, read 22,470,999 times
Reputation: 8244
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chemistry_Guy View Post
Change "Wyoming" to "Lockland" and I would mostly agree with you. Only the lower third of Wyoming really sits in the valley, and the Mill Creek is along the border, not running right through. Clearly, though, the western side of Wyoming up on top of the hill is more affluent, but all of Wyoming has a lot more of the walking/biking neighborhood feel than comparable neighborhoods way out in the suburbs.

I would generally agree with this. the "hill side" of Wyoming has few negatives compared with the part that is essentially Lockland with better schools.
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Old 08-03-2011, 05:41 PM
 
10,139 posts, read 22,470,999 times
Reputation: 8244
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
Wilson... And I for one would not want to live in Hyde Park or Mt Lookout. Wyoming at least has a long history of doing for itself, good schools, pleasant surroundings, nice people. That is a lot more than you can say for the City as a whole. Faulting people for living there to me is just petty.

Since when are Madison Rd, Observatory, Erie and Delta Avenues models of tranquility? They were examples of urban blight 50 years ago when I traveled them to UC and still are. The off streets on the hills having the large homes with river views are the only reason this area is still decent to live in, similar to Clifton and North Avondale. The overaged and overpriced apartments which line the main roads are a throwback. Like going to visit England and staying in a storied hotel just to find out it doesn't have air conditioning or for that matter even decent hot water for a shower. Even the newest shopping center Rookwood Commons is in Norwood, not Hyde Park. The only thing I can see the area has to offer is relative safety as long as you do not stray too far.

Now if you have a determined reason to live close to the Inner City, and I will bet a business/job/financial reason comes into play, then both Wyoming and Hyde Park/Mt. Lookout come into play. But in my case I have no such reason. Lord and behold my former company sold their property in Norwood where Rookwood Commons is now located and moved to Mason where they could acquire land and build a start-of-the-art facility for what they got for the land in Norwood. Best day in my life. I went from a long distance commute, as I had moved to Mason earlier, to a less than 1 mile trip.

For those who say the City is the spark for business, I say BS. Just look around at how many businesses have decided to locate out in the suburbs. Of course tax abatements and the rest come into play. But I also feel the knowledge their employees can get desirable housing in the immediate area means a lot.
Why you would choose to personalize this with me is beyond comprehension. I couldn't care less what you think about Hyde Park.
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Old 08-03-2011, 06:11 PM
 
10,139 posts, read 22,470,999 times
Reputation: 8244
Quote:
Originally Posted by zaphod001 View Post
Well, I did decide to live there and I didn't grow up there. I will be moving from the Boston area to my new home in Wyoming in September.

I don't think the reasons why I want to live there will shock you, as they are cited in almost every single thread about Wyoming. Nevertheless, I will go through the exercise of stating why I wanted to live there, in case such a thing is of value to other people reading CD.

1) Top notch public schools, without a) the complications of needing to "test in" to a good school (why Hyde Park living/Walnut Hills HS schooling was less attractive to me personally -- although I know that place is great and all and many think it's the bee's knees), or b) the extreme concern for overprivileged social climbing based on wealth that seems to come up (accurately or inaccurately) whenever the Indian Hill school district is mentioned. I make no claim as to the veracity of how this applies to IH schools, and I acknowledge I may be overvaluing impressions of people who know not of what they speak. Regardless, the possiblity it would be true seems plausible and aversive enough to make Indian Hill less attractive to me personally.
2) Closer to where my wife and I will be working (Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center) than places we considered in e.g. the Sycamore School district, although those were perfectly nice
3) Slightly less homogeneity than some other places (I understand this is only incremental, but it was a factor for us -- see Terrace Park demographics vs Wyoming demographics; Terrace Park is 99.3% white and Wyoming is 83.6% white). We seriously considered Terrace Park, which is lovely, but thought we'd find more more non-white faces in Wyoming (a plus for us) AND have more in common with our neighbors in Wyoming than in TP. Mind you, I have zero interest in slagging TP, which is truly lovely, nor to imply anything bad about the people who live there. But I mention this to try to answer the question, "Why Wyoming?"
4) The departments my wife and I will be working for put us in contact with people who lived in Wyoming and loved it and what we heard was consistent with what we heard elsewhere about what it was like to live and raise a family there
5) Relative stability of property value
6) We could afford the kind of residence we will be comfortable in, in a neighborhood with other kids, but also greenery
7) The only people who seem to raise concern about the neighborhoods surrounding Wyoming and how that might affect safety are those who know the least about Wyoming, and no one who lives there ever seems to have those concerns
8) Nobody, not even once, ever raised any concern about the water or pollution with the exception of Wilson513, who does so repeatedly, and with great vigor. FYI, Wilson, my future house is nowhere near any expressways.

Potential downsides to Wyoming we considered:
1) Somewhat older housing stock
2) Lack of selection of houses we liked in our price range at the particular time we were looking
3) Lack of walkability to a commercial center with much in the way of restaurants, ice cream shops, etc
4) Lack of walkability of the house we settled on to an elementary school, a park suitable for young children, the library, or a pool (although these are all close by and easily accessible by car)

Note that others making a list would have downsides that weren't significant for us. The price of houses in Wyoming is high relative to much of Cincinnati, but not relative to other areas we were considering. I cannot stumble home from a bar after a night of carousing, but that is not what I'm looking for in a community, and after having lived in (and tired of) areas in which that is a hallmark of the neighborhood culture, it holds no appeal for me. In no way, shape, or form, does Wyoming seem like urban living. And so on for factors others might consider important in choosing a community for themselves...

In the end, the positives outweighed the negatives for us. Ergo, we are happy soon-to-be Wyomingites. My expectation is that in Wyoming we will find a welcoming, cohesive community that supports things we value -- among them the value of education and artistic and musical pursuits. I sincerely doubt my expectations will be disappointed and certainly nothing has come to my attention to call this into question.
I wish you the best of luck with your choice. Hopefully, you will be happy there. As you can see from the postings here, Wyoming has a loyal and enthusiastic following. For my part, there is not much that can be done for persons who have already made this choice, but I think it is important to have some facts in a thread like this for those who have not made the commitment to Wyoming. I can't imagine it myself. Most everywhere, it is enormously undesirable to live in the transportation/industrial corridor of any city. Wyoming is dead center in the middle of the worst part of that corridor. Wyoming was settled before that corridor was as well developed as it is today. Combine that with the low lying land and surrounding communities and it seems an unlikely choice for analytical persons. It is, however, an oasis in a desert of highways, ghettos, industry and pollution. If you dropped into Wyoming from space, it would seem a decent place. But in the context of its surroundings, it certainly challenges the imagination as to why one would want to live there.

And, even if Wyoming was perfect (which it is not), just the trip from and to Childrens Hospital would be enough to put me off that as a choice. Unless I am mistaken, that would either be a trip down Vine Street to the hospital or Vine to Paddock to Reading, though the worst part of Avondale and on to Childrens. It is easier than Terrace Park of course, but about as un-scenic a drive as one could find.

But, the school thing makes some sense and I understand your choice. good luck!

Last edited by Wilson513; 08-03-2011 at 06:28 PM..
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Old 08-03-2011, 08:06 PM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,395,175 times
Reputation: 1920
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wilson513 View Post
Why you would choose to personalize this with me is beyond comprehension. I couldn't care less what you think about Hyde Park.
It is very simple, your pontificating constantly about how Hyde Park and Mt. Lookout are the only obvious places to live in the City, and knocking a very desirable place like Wyoming. If you would get off your high horse and admit people have various reasons for living where they do, and not all are idiots in their reasoning, the reception may be more kindly.
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Old 08-04-2011, 06:24 AM
 
2,886 posts, read 3,961,890 times
Reputation: 1499
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wilson513 View Post
Wyoming has all of the negatives a residential area could have: busy Xway spewing pollution and noise, busy railroad, the most polluted stream in the US, sits on a valley floor, no real amenities, surrounded by problematic neighborhoods.

I can't imagine why anyone would want to live there if they didn't grow up in Wyoming.
Moderator cut: see your rep comments When you otherwise rational people keep responding to these repetitive postings, you're actually eliciting more and more of the repetitive responses. Remember, one definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over and hoping for a different result.

Last edited by Yac; 08-05-2011 at 02:06 AM..
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Old 08-04-2011, 07:31 AM
 
Location: Clifton
34 posts, read 63,876 times
Reputation: 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by zaphod001 View Post
Well, I did decide to live there and I didn't grow up there. I will be moving from the Boston area to my new home in Wyoming in September.

I don't think the reasons why I want to live there will shock you, as they are cited in almost every single thread about Wyoming. Nevertheless, I will go through the exercise of stating why I wanted to live there, in case such a thing is of value to other people reading CD.

1) Top notch public schools, without a) the complications of needing to "test in" to a good school (why Hyde Park living/Walnut Hills HS schooling was less attractive to me personally -- although I know that place is great and all and many think it's the bee's knees), or b) the extreme concern for overprivileged social climbing based on wealth that seems to come up (accurately or inaccurately) whenever the Indian Hill school district is mentioned. I make no claim as to the veracity of how this applies to IH schools, and I acknowledge I may be overvaluing impressions of people who know not of what they speak. Regardless, the possiblity it would be true seems plausible and aversive enough to make Indian Hill less attractive to me personally.
2) Closer to where my wife and I will be working (Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center) than places we considered in e.g. the Sycamore School district, although those were perfectly nice
3) Slightly less homogeneity than some other places (I understand this is only incremental, but it was a factor for us -- see Terrace Park demographics vs Wyoming demographics; Terrace Park is 99.3% white and Wyoming is 83.6% white). We seriously considered Terrace Park, which is lovely, but thought we'd find more more non-white faces in Wyoming (a plus for us) AND have more in common with our neighbors in Wyoming than in TP. Mind you, I have zero interest in slagging TP, which is truly lovely, nor to imply anything bad about the people who live there. But I mention this to try to answer the question, "Why Wyoming?"
4) The departments my wife and I will be working for put us in contact with people who lived in Wyoming and loved it and what we heard was consistent with what we heard elsewhere about what it was like to live and raise a family there
5) Relative stability of property value
6) We could afford the kind of residence we will be comfortable in, in a neighborhood with other kids, but also greenery
7) The only people who seem to raise concern about the neighborhoods surrounding Wyoming and how that might affect safety are those who know the least about Wyoming, and no one who lives there ever seems to have those concerns
8) Nobody, not even once, ever raised any concern about the water or pollution with the exception of Wilson513, who does so repeatedly, and with great vigor. FYI, Wilson, my future house is nowhere near any expressways.

Potential downsides to Wyoming we considered:
1) Somewhat older housing stock
2) Lack of selection of houses we liked in our price range at the particular time we were looking
3) Lack of walkability to a commercial center with much in the way of restaurants, ice cream shops, etc
4) Lack of walkability of the house we settled on to an elementary school, a park suitable for young children, the library, or a pool (although these are all close by and easily accessible by car)

Note that others making a list would have downsides that weren't significant for us. The price of houses in Wyoming is high relative to much of Cincinnati, but not relative to other areas we were considering. I cannot stumble home from a bar after a night of carousing, but that is not what I'm looking for in a community, and after having lived in (and tired of) areas in which that is a hallmark of the neighborhood culture, it holds no appeal for me. In no way, shape, or form, does Wyoming seem like urban living. And so on for factors others might consider important in choosing a community for themselves...

In the end, the positives outweighed the negatives for us. Ergo, we are happy soon-to-be Wyomingites. My expectation is that in Wyoming we will find a welcoming, cohesive community that supports things we value -- among them the value of education and artistic and musical pursuits. I sincerely doubt my expectations will be disappointed and certainly nothing has come to my attention to call this into question.
Great post, and all good reasons to move to Wyoming. Again, I'll state that I grew up in Hartwell, which is directly south of Wyoming. I absolutely loved my childhood, and even the train that passed everyday. Even though it is in the CPS school district, by grade five, I could hold a conversation in Spanish with my teacher.

Wyoming is a great community and I have no doubt you'll enjoy living there. As quoted by the great philosophical gangster rapper, Quint Black, "Shake Dem Haters."
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Old 08-05-2011, 11:08 PM
 
Location: Hartwell--IN THE City of Cincinnati
1,055 posts, read 3,567,947 times
Reputation: 904
Wilson...tisk, tisk. Bite your tongue & mind yourself. Shameful I have to come back to remind you to play nicely. Leave the Valley alone. I've lived here for 10 years now and i havent grown any extra fingers, lost my hair or turned green.

CinnyKate, welcome. I live in Hartwell. Your neighborhood to the south which many in Wyoming probably doesnt like much BUT, I will say, there are many places in Wyoming I like to visit.

First, stop in at Gabby's, introduce yourself to Dino, the owner. He is a good person and loves to take care of the locals.
Stop into the Wyoming meat market and enjoy a soup & sandwich lunch with the Butcher and his wife. They are good people too.
The Wyoming Pastry shop is a fave of mine- another family owned business which loves the relationships they have with their customers. I was just in there on Monday and will be in there again tomorrow to pick up some items for a party. If you need a cake, see Kim, I promise she is the best ;-)
Dont miss the Farmers Market...enough said.

There are plenty of ladies groups to get involved in and you can find most of the information about meetings on the Wyoming web site.

There is plenty to do in Wyoming-even if I dont live there, I spend a lot of time in the area. We just bought a less expensive house down the street which happens to be in the City of Cincinnati.
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