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Old 08-23-2011, 02:13 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
477 posts, read 530,004 times
Reputation: 275

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Quote:
Maybe the total population will go up as some rich White move back in places like OTR, but I just don't see masses of poor moving to the cul-de-sacs of Finneytown or Colerain.
RestorationConsultant is right here. I've seen in it in Chicago. The mall where the Blues Brothers took place is in one of those areas. Harvey, Illinois - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - There are a lot of 1950s-60s suburbs on the south side that are like this.
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Old 08-24-2011, 04:51 PM
 
Location: Green Township
329 posts, read 564,414 times
Reputation: 139
(On Topic, Not About the Siding on my House)

Places I see making a rebound sooner or later within 20 years obviously are OTR, Areas of Price Hill and Fairmount, Some parts of Avondale.

Places I see going downhill are...

Monfort Heights (Already is going downhill)
Bridgetown
People can agree on this one, Colerain Township
White Oak
Westwood
College Hill
Mt. Healthy
Fairfield
Ross
Hamilton
Southern Parts of Westchester, surprisingly
Forest Park
Springdale
Springfield Township for sure
Indian Hill (Reason for this, is that in the current economy, the need to be closer to work and the sheer outlandish prices of housing there is out of the question when they could have the best of both worlds in OTR WHEN, yes I said when, it bounces back).
Mt. Washington
Western parts of Anderson Township NEAR Mt. Washington
Mt. Airy

-----

So basically anything within a mile of Hamilton Avenue or Colerain Avenue is or is already going downhill.

I hope things really turn around on the Westside especially, its not looking good.

-----

BUT this isn't to say the city won't spread further out.

I can see NKY starting to become more recognized.
Harrison becoming the suburban Westside.
Cincinnati and Dayton suburbs connected.
Places once considered rural such as Cleves and Millville becoming more suburban.
Most of Interstate 75 reconstructed making the city not look like a depressed bible rust belt and more appealing.

Last edited by Bhiggins; 08-24-2011 at 05:29 PM..
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Old 08-24-2011, 06:37 PM
 
5,318 posts, read 6,616,053 times
Reputation: 2650
I think even the eastern parts of Anderson are going downhill. The Beechmont Ave/8 Mile Rd area (Summit Estates) is definitely more run down today compared to the 1980s.
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Old 08-25-2011, 01:40 PM
 
41 posts, read 64,943 times
Reputation: 33
I'm an optimist. I think 2020 will be the first time time we see an uptick in Cincinnati's population in 70 years. It will be modest growth, but it will set the stage for larger growth in 2030.

The City will implement a program to unload City owned properties- a sort of "liquidation sale" to raise money to run the city. This program will result in a lot of cheap "project space" in the city center. We'll see more DAAP students opening up fashion/industrial/bespoke design shops in OTR/Brighton/Northside/CBD/Clifton. This will develop into one of Cincinnati's defining features

Micro-breweries will pick up steam and inhabit some of the old industrial buildings in OTR and Camp Washington.

The streetcar will be built ( a long, slow, complaint-filled process). The Casino will pay to be connected. The Banks will be connected. There will be development of nightlife along the line, and we will have little pocket entertainment districts.

We will finally have rail connections to both CVG and DAY airports.

Peebles Corner will be undergoing a 3CDC-like "overhaul." A few restaurants and bars will start to sprout and test the waters.

There will be a Food Cart explosion. Mobile restaurants all over the city!

We will have a strong Latino enclave somewhere. St. Bernard?
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Old 08-27-2011, 10:44 AM
 
6,351 posts, read 18,889,368 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by restorationconsultant View Post
One of the more interesting demographics of the recent census was that the suburbs are growing older and that seniors are no longer moving to areas like Florida but instead "aging in place" you are seeing alot of that in Indy and Chicago already. As these people age they are becoming more frugal and very anti tax. One fairly afflent township near Indianapolis now has to pay for bus transportation (495.00 per student)for school because a referndum to increase the achool tax rate was voted down and the township had to go to private bus service. Not the first place that has happened.

The Old high school on White street in Fairmount is reopening as a pre-k-6 "academy" and there is a new private school over on Waverly, not to mention Orion Academy on Queen City. Clearly expectations and school choices are being driven by a new dynamic of urban profesionals moving to the city to get away from the suburbia they grew up in. Increasingly in my neighborhood many of our new Urban pioneers are in their 20's or 30's with kids who have 'outgrown their OTR condos and certainly are not poor and want to live ina diverse neighborhood.

Although its hard for many 'native' Cincinnatians to accept change, change is coming and many of our current ideas of what are 'good or bad' areas is changing mostly driven by younger profesionals accepting jobs in Cincinnati.

While many of the young who grew up here want to leave, To non locals, Cincinnati is a place with a lot of promise and dirt cheap housing.
Excellent post, Restoration Consultant! Even up here in Montgomery Co. I see the same thing. WE were attracted to SW Ohio for (among other things) the "dirt cheap housing", especially to a then-booming Boise, ID where I retired from the USAF. We'll be "aging in place, as well. (Neither of us care for FL except for a two-week vacation in the Winter...)

Currently, our school district doesn't have problems passing levies. Many of our older residents understand that funding is getting tougher, good schools bolster their home's value and someone paid for THEIR kids to be educated. HOWEVER, I'm concerned that a shrinking economy and Wall Stret's shenanigans will cause Seniors to lose large chunks of their retirement nest eggs. And that surely will affect their votes for levies.

I also look at Centerville's aging stock of ranchers and other more modest homes. And I see Dayton's poor fleeing the city; whether because of gentrification (assuming the jobs come downtown...) or inability for the slum lords to maintain their properties as you describe above.

Last edited by Crew Chief; 08-27-2011 at 02:21 PM..
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Old 08-27-2011, 12:42 PM
 
2,886 posts, read 3,952,895 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Crew Chief View Post
...HOWEVER, I'm concerned that a shrinking economy and Wall Stret's shenanigans will cause Seniors to lose large chunks of their retirement nest eggs. And that surely will affect their votes for levies. ...
Did you miss 2008? Now what you should be concerned about is whether seniors will lose large chunks of their pensions. If some miracle doesn't happen to straighten out the mess in Washington, it seems like a very real possibility. Then people simply won't be paying taxes at all. I'm puzzled as to why this scenario seems so appealing to so many middle-class people.
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Old 08-27-2011, 02:18 PM
 
6,351 posts, read 18,889,368 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sarah Perry View Post
Did you miss 2008? Now what you should be concerned about is whether seniors will lose large chunks of their pensions. If some miracle doesn't happen to straighten out the mess in Washington, it seems like a very real possibility. Then people simply won't be paying taxes at all. I'm puzzled as to why this scenario seems so appealing to so many middle-class people.
Sarah, I'm VERY worried about EVERY American's investments tanking. Especially seniors. Our neighbors are in their late 70s/early 80s. Going back to work is not an option for either of them. And they'd lose money if they sold their home now. So that's one heckuva predicament to be in. Even with about 10 years before retirement, a military pension coming in AND a teacher retirement, we're even concerned.
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Old 08-27-2011, 03:00 PM
 
2,886 posts, read 3,952,895 times
Reputation: 1499
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crew Chief View Post
Sarah, I'm VERY worried about EVERY American's investments tanking. Especially seniors. Our neighbors are in their late 70s/early 80s. Going back to work is not an option for either of them. And they'd lose money if they sold their home now. So that's one heckuva predicament to be in. Even with about 10 years before retirement, a military pension coming in AND a teacher retirement, we're even concerned.
Well, Chief, I'm relieved to hear what kind of pensions those are you're concerned about, because they probably offer a better measure of safety than many others. My husband is lucky to have a pension from one of the better-funded state systems, but things seem so f--ked up in Washington that you have to wonder whether financial Armageddon is lurking a few years down the road for everyone. And when I mentioned seniors specifically, I was just citing the context in the post I was replying to. This is a very sad situation for people who are some years from retirement, too.
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