U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Happy Easter!
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Ohio > Cincinnati
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-18-2011, 07:02 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
3,335 posts, read 5,746,317 times
Reputation: 2058

Advertisements

abr7rmj - i didn't realize you were an ex-Coloradan - i eventually got the message from the infamous "native" bumper sticker and moved away

Goygoy - glad you liked the gaslight - that has become absolutely my favorite neighborhood bar.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-18-2011, 07:56 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
31,309 posts, read 57,533,772 times
Reputation: 52200
Quote:
Originally Posted by abr7rmj View Post
... and then you have the cynical, cranky natives who have always lived here, rarely ever go anywhere, love to complain about it, trash its potential, scoff at its ambitions, oppose all its efforts to better itself and don't really want to see it grow and prosper.
But the instant someone from out of town utters one suggestion or negative thought, the cranky natives turn into employees of Cincinnati USA.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-18-2011, 08:06 AM
 
2,492 posts, read 3,664,039 times
Reputation: 1385
Quote:
Originally Posted by progmac View Post
abr7rmj - i didn't realize you were an ex-Coloradan - i eventually got the message from the infamous "native" bumper sticker and moved away
Five years in Denver and also Cheyenne, which is about 95 miles north of Denver along the Front Range. Colorado is my favorite state; Cincinnati ties New York for my favorite city.

And there are variations of that "Native" bumper sticker to answer back or to poke fun at the natives:

"Near Native"

"Not a native but got here as fast as I could"

"Semi-native"

"NAIVE"
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-18-2011, 10:45 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
3,335 posts, read 5,746,317 times
Reputation: 2058
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
But the instant someone from out of town utters one suggestion or negative thought, the cranky natives turn into employees of Cincinnati USA.
this is, of course, much how a dysfunctional family acts. or a clan of badgers.

in reality, i think it is because criticisms from out-of-towners of not only cincinnati but many US regions and city with fairly low churn are typically repetitive and pedantic
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-18-2011, 10:47 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
3,335 posts, read 5,746,317 times
Reputation: 2058
Quote:
Originally Posted by abr7rmj View Post
Five years in Denver and also Cheyenne, which is about 95 miles north of Denver along the Front Range. Colorado is my favorite state; Cincinnati ties New York for my favorite city.

And there are variations of that "Native" bumper sticker to answer back or to poke fun at the natives:

"Near Native"

"Not a native but got here as fast as I could"

"Semi-native"

"NAIVE"
i always preferred the one that simply said, "transplant" with the same font on the same mountain background.

i loved and love colorado (I lived on the western slope) but always thought, who are you kidding with your 'native' bumper sticker.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-18-2011, 11:07 AM
 
5,807 posts, read 10,384,280 times
Reputation: 4311
Quote:
Originally Posted by goyguy View Post
I was also in Cincinnati over this past weekend, for a five-day visit. And I agree, in small doses it's a great place to go for architectural eye candy + good eats + friendly strangers etc etc. But like New York City, excursions to Cincy as a tourist (though in this case native-born) and living there are two different animals. Even people casually chatted up at a bar want to know what school you attended - and they mean high school. The "hip, happenin'" areas like Northside look like you'd be able to run the gamut of fun hangouts inside of a month, then wait around who knows how long for the next cool thing to come down the pike. Mass transit is in a sorry state - on the expensive side, slow, and sporadic - while wingnuts scream bloody murder over the very prospect of even a "trolley to nowhere" after the hopefully one-term governor yanked the funds for a longer light-rail line.
Sure, a guided group tour of OTR is interesting and Findlay Market can't be beat for all kinds of good fresh food. The local chili - an acquired taste, to be sure - might be a new favorite gustatory vice. Jaw-dropping mansions and appealing row houses seem to grow on trees in some parts of town; the parks are green jewels; the museums and arts organizations are world-class and the zoo is practically in a class by itself; on and on it goes. All of that makes for a trip to be remembered. When it's on a 52-week-a-year basis it starts to wear thin and become a defense mechanism instead of part of a sales pitch. (Unless, of course, you like living in a provincial city where nothing raises hackles like the "S" words "streetcar" and "Section 8," you're immediately prejudged based on your home community and high school diploma, a Jimmy Buffett concert is THE SOCIAL EVENT OF THE YEAR, the racial vibe is about as "up South" as it gets, blah blah blah.)
Also - important to realize - the weather this past weekend was phee-fricken-nomenal and nothing like a typical 'nati August. Usually you're sweltering in a smog bowl with temps and humidity in the upper 90's day after day. Fall and spring are beautiful seasons, but winters and summers tend toward the flat-out nasty.
But hey, my usual "half-full glass" attitude reflexively changes to "half-empty glass" when we're talking Cincinnati and I'm the first to admit it. There are definitely worse places to settle in. For me, keeping some distance and making 3-6 visits per year works best. Seems that'd be a happy medium for the OP also.

P.S. When in Pleasant Ridge, the best place for food of dubious nutritional value (especially if you're not a Cincy chili fan) is the Gas Light Café on the east side of Montgomery Rd just north of Ridge Ave. Their hamburgers fully deserve to be in contention for the "best in town," taters fried in whatever form are at the perfect level of crispness, the interior of the place looks unchanged since the '50s if not earlier, the employees and customers are outgoing with each other all around while "Cincinnati apartheid" is checked at the door. When I'm back I'll go back!
What you are describing can be true of any city. There is always a difference between visiting a city and living there.

Other than for environment-liberal guilt, I prefere driving to public transportation. Maybe I'm just too American.

In Chicago my favorite destinations are the two zoos, and the Cook County Forest preserves. To me if you've been to one indie rock venue, you pretty much been to them all.

And what I find fascinating, is that although you may have instances of more extreme segregation, and more open racism in southern cities, the number of neighborhoods where you actually have a 50-50 or 25-75 mix of black and white, with the neighbors also regularly speaking with on another is suprisingloy high. This is very true in Atlanta, a city that has become a mecca for black white collared professionals.

In the Chicago area, for a metro area of its size, the number of decent communities to live in that are even 10% African American are shockingly few. I live in one of them Oak Park, but for some strange reason, the % of blacks in the recent census dropped.

And if you check out some recent threads on the Chicago forum, there is one titled "It sucks to a be a black educated male in Chicago" He talks about how he just doesn't fit in on the yuppie north side, and that there are basically no majority black areas that are even desirable to live in. And the responses hes getting is "Well, as long as you don't wear hip hip clothes they won't give you a hard time in the bars and clubs. Dress in Banana Republic and you'll fit in just fine." And this is Chicago, a city that is obsessed with talking about its diversity.

At least Cincinnati is more honest about its race issues. In Chicago, they spin segregation into "neighborhood variety unlike anywhere else." AKA: we can live in our all American neighborhood where we all went to a Big Ten university and take the El to Pilsen where we can be tranported to Guadalajara for a night and experience true Mexican food. We are so lucky to have this much culture."

Although a southern/Appalachian influence may mean some very open or extreme instances of racism, at their best I think they can more effortlessly blend in with AAs at times, because Appalachians were poor, discriminated against, disadvantaged and had similar food and religious traditions. Whereas in northern cities, people of eastern of southern heritage, regard African American culture as being almost exotic.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-18-2011, 12:40 PM
 
2,492 posts, read 3,664,039 times
Reputation: 1385
Quote:
Originally Posted by progmac View Post
i always preferred the one that simply said, "transplant" with the same font on the same mountain background.

i loved and love colorado (I lived on the western slope) but always thought, who are you kidding with your 'native' bumper sticker.
I get the feeling that those "Native" bumper stickers are directed at two groups in particular that continue to plague Colorado by moving there:

Texans and Californians

They're the ones that clog Rocky Mountain National Park with their giant SUVs and want to force their culture (and their problems) on Colorado. I never once got the sense, being from Ohio, that I was unwelcome. I did, however, start to get annoyed by the Texas transplants. I guess that made me a "Semi-native."
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-19-2011, 03:13 AM
 
89 posts, read 159,123 times
Reputation: 103
I moved to Cincinnati a year ago and at this point I've experienced a lot of good and a lot of bad. The good definitely outweighs the bad, though, and even the prospect of leaving after I get my Ph.D. (in 5 years at the earliest) is more than a little sad. Unfortunately there's almost no way I'll be able to stick around after that point with my ambitions to be a professor and some rather stringent rules about hiring candidates produced in-house.

I lived for 5 years in Asheville, North Carolina. It's a much smaller place with much less structured activity, but overall people seem to love it to pieces. It was a lovely place. I like Cincinnati more.

From a sociological standpoint the city seems to be on the incline in a number of areas. Crime is going down slowly taking into account trends over time. OTR is the fastest gentrifying neighborhood in the US (and no longer the most dangerous!). Cincinnati is in the top 10 for concentration of Fortune 500 companies (above San Francisco, Los Angeles, New York City, Chicago, and Boston if I recall correctly). It regularly makes lists as a destination for college graduates and for high quality of life at lower prices. The population experienced a sharp decline between 2000 and 2010 but year-by-year analyses of the trend show a resurgence in growth.

The streetcar is a nifty idea and I hope it succeeds. I don't think it will be either the unmitigated disaster or the golden-gilded savior people around here tend to believe it will be, but it appears to have potential to help. I for one am excited about being able to hop one from downtown to Findlay Market. The Banks looks pretty awesome so far. Hell, I even like the Bengals, though I'm the first to say their most popular merchandise is CRIPPLING DEPRESSION.

Cincinnati is lovely. It isn't perfect. While I've been here I've experienced a few negative things. But those aren't Cincinnati. The people I've met and the places I've visited are Cincinnati. It's not New York or LA or Chicago and that's great, because if every city was a sprawling metropolis of millions I'd have to go live on the moon.

I'm obviously what would qualify as a Cincinnati "booster" on this board, though I try to stay out of arguments about the city. I'm glad you enjoyed your trip and I hope you grace us with your presence again soon!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-23-2011, 03:40 PM
 
5,807 posts, read 10,384,280 times
Reputation: 4311
You know, I forgot to add a couple things:

I finally tried goetta. I picked some up at the Krogers before I left the area. Its alright, its not disgusting like people make it out to be. Its just steel cut oats, ground up port, onions, and spices. Then fried.

I noticed that at the hotel in Norwood I was staying at, it seems like Norwood has a noticeable hispanic population. There was the Cancun bar and grill next door. And there were some guys speaking spanish. The people at the front desk were also hispanic. I bring that up since Cincy doesn't have that huge of a hispanic population.

Also, despite the fact that the shopping areas around the Tri-county mall looked in great shape, with stores looking busy, etc. I noticed some of the residential areas in Springdale looked like kind of in bad shape - like it got hit hard by foreclosures of something.

There were areas that looked like cheap brick ranches from the 50s. I remember driving down a residential side street (kind of was lost) that looked like nicer 70s construction that definitely looked better, but even there there were a few houses that looked foreclosed.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-24-2011, 10:59 PM
 
2,492 posts, read 3,664,039 times
Reputation: 1385
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tex?Il? View Post
You know, I forgot to add a couple things:

I finally tried goetta. I picked some up at the Krogers before I left the area. Its alright, its not disgusting like people make it out to be. Its just steel cut oats, ground up port, onions, and spices. Then fried.

I noticed that at the hotel in Norwood I was staying at, it seems like Norwood has a noticeable hispanic population. There was the Cancun bar and grill next door. And there were some guys speaking spanish. The people at the front desk were also hispanic. I bring that up since Cincy doesn't have that huge of a hispanic population.

Also, despite the fact that the shopping areas around the Tri-county mall looked in great shape, with stores looking busy, etc. I noticed some of the residential areas in Springdale looked like kind of in bad shape - like it got hit hard by foreclosures of something.

There were areas that looked like cheap brick ranches from the 50s. I remember driving down a residential side street (kind of was lost) that looked like nicer 70s construction that definitely looked better, but even there there were a few houses that looked foreclosed.
You lost me, man.

Seriously, I'm not sure why Cincinnati is linked with goetta to the extent that it is. I get that it's a west side thing, but the next time I see it somewhere other than Findlay Market might actually be the first time. It's a myth - like the "what high school did you go to" myth.

And there are several areas in the Tri-state besides Norwood where you'd be just as likely to hear Spanish (or some other language) as English. Fairfield, in particular, is home to a large population of Hispanics.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Ohio > Cincinnati
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top