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Old 09-20-2011, 08:32 AM
Status: "Winter's Here" (set 21 days ago)
 
Location: Mason, OH
8,719 posts, read 7,028,840 times
Reputation: 1732

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As I said lambast me. The advice given to the OP all made sense, and if they do in fact have a reason to live in Walnut Hills was good. I was just commenting as long as people feel compelled to dissect Cincinnati neighborhoods street by street there is a long way to go.

Resurgency within the City is a good thing. Just because I do not want to live there does not mean I am against the City. What I am against is people painting a rosy picture for an area which is not so rosy. Of course someone must take the gamble to improve a neighborhood. But 50ish women, give me a break.

Those advocating the rebirth of urban living seem compelled to do it at the expense of suburban living, attempting to cite all of the environmental ills suburban living has fostered. Get off your high horse and concentrate on why urban living is desirable. You project the walkability of neighborhoods. But the reality is if you walk you will likely be mugged or worse. When people can feel safe and confident in the City neighborhoods, they will revive. Until then, mox nix.

I have no problem with the desire of people to revive the City's neighborhoods. What I have a problem with is their tactics. Slamming the suburbs as being enrivonmentally unfriendly. Exclaiming how cheap property in the City is, even though most of it will require enormous sums to make livable, which most people cannot afford.

And the gentrification. Even the name generates feelings of ill will within me, as it denotes the gentry or privileged class. If the revival of Cincinnati means driving out all of the people who do not meet the gentry classification, I hope it fails miserably.

OK,I have given you enough fodder for another round of rousting. Hope it makes all of you feel better. Myself, I will spend another day in my nondescript neighborhood, going to my local Kroger store by car (1 mile), purchasing some groceries for the week, returning to my nondescript home in my nondescript subdivision, but content in the fact I was not accosted or threatened in any way during this ordeal.

Those who feel compelled to criticize my life in Mason must be very well less convinced of their own. I make no bones about advocating Mason as a great place for families with children. And in my case a great place for seniors. Do I recommend it for everyone? - NO! Just because I advocate Mason I am an enemy of the City? Just to those who want to believe suburbia is the root of all the problems, and refuse to look within their own back yards.
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Old 09-20-2011, 08:41 AM
 
2,330 posts, read 2,141,406 times
Reputation: 1096
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vintrest View Post
...My opinion of Walnut Hills after seeing it first hand is that is is still stuggling but it has some tremendous historic architectural assets Its inner-city location makes it an ideal neighborhood to experience a gradual turn-around, IMO. ..
Thanks for the compliment. I probably get painted with the same anti-urban brush as some other contributors here (despite living in an inner ring suburb a few miles from downtown), but what I really want for people who are new to the area is to find the neighborhood that's right for them. I AM a strong believer that people should err on the side of caution in terms of crime and property values until they've spent some time here. I absolutely agree with kjbrill that a neighborhood where a newcomer has to ask "is this street okay even though the next street over is not?" is probably not the most prudent choice. Even though it may be fine for someone else who knows exactly what they're getting into.

When I moved back here with my husband in tow--an individual of considerable wisdom, experience and intelligence--it was interesting to watch him go through the process of finally figuring out the subtleties of a number of different neighborhoods. If it confirmed one thing for me, it's how much initial surface impressions can change.
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Old 09-20-2011, 09:02 AM
Status: "Winter's Here" (set 21 days ago)
 
Location: Mason, OH
8,719 posts, read 7,028,840 times
Reputation: 1732
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sarah Perry View Post
Thanks for the compliment. I probably get painted with the same anti-urban brush as some other contributors here (despite living in an inner ring suburb a few miles from downtown), but what I really want for people who are new to the area is to find the neighborhood that's right for them. I AM a strong believer that people should err on the side of caution in terms of crime and property values until they've spent some time here. I absolutely agree with kjbrill that a neighborhood where a newcomer has to ask "is this street okay even though the next street over is not?" is probably not the most prudent choice. Even though it may be fine for someone else who knows exactly what they're getting into.

When I moved back here with my husband in tow--an individual of considerable wisdom, experience and intelligence--it was interesting to watch him go through the process of finally figuring out the subtleties of a number of different neighborhoods. If it confirmed one thing for me, it's how much initial surface impressions can change.
Sarah... I am a fan of your posts, particularly since you tell it like it is. If you live within the City boundaries, you must be concerned about your immediate neighborhood. If undesirables move in, you must consider how to get them out. You must be concerned about your property value, directly or indirectly. Be good to the overall City, but first and foremost protect your own.

If more people had your attitude, Cincinnati would definitely be on the upswing.
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Old 09-20-2011, 09:48 AM
 
2,330 posts, read 2,141,406 times
Reputation: 1096
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
Sarah... I am a fan of your posts, particularly since you tell it like it is. If you live within the City boundaries, you must be concerned about your immediate neighborhood. If undesirables move in, you must consider how to get them out. You must be concerned about your property value, directly or indirectly. Be good to the overall City, but first and foremost protect your own.

If more people had your attitude, Cincinnati would definitely be on the upswing.
You guys need to quit, you're embarrassing me. Seriously, thanks.

The worst issues facing my immediate neighborhood continue to be the quality of CPS (neighborhood school in perpetual academic emergency, although there are now two desirable magnet schools nearby) and the same foreclosures that are happening in a lot of other places. So far, we seem to have weathered the worst of it; a house which was even stripped of its plumbing fixtures by a departing defaulting owner now has one of the desirable type of young families in it and new landscaping in the yard. There are at least two or three other foreclosures now vacant and awaiting buyers, though.
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Old 09-20-2011, 10:36 AM
 
2,485 posts, read 2,131,920 times
Reputation: 1321
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post

Resurgency within the City is a good thing. Just because I do not want to live there does not mean I am against the City. What I am against is people painting a rosy picture for an area which is not so rosy. Of course someone must take the gamble to improve a neighborhood. But 50ish women, give me a break.

Don't stereotype and judge people based on age and gender, kjbrill. You did it with the 20-something from Copenhagen and you're doing it here.
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Old 09-20-2011, 10:56 AM
Status: "Winter's Here" (set 21 days ago)
 
Location: Mason, OH
8,719 posts, read 7,028,840 times
Reputation: 1732
Quote:
Originally Posted by abr7rmj View Post
Don't stereotype and judge people based on age and gender, kjbrill. You did it with the 20-something from Copenhagen and you're doing it here.
You can call it stereotyping. I call it having earned the right to a peaceful and safe neighborhood. If they want to be urban pioneers fine, I have no problem with that.
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Old 09-20-2011, 11:01 AM
 
2,485 posts, read 2,131,920 times
Reputation: 1321
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
You can call it stereotyping. I call it having earned the right to a peaceful and safe neighborhood. If they want to be urban pioneers fine, I have no problem with that.
There are peaceful and safe neighborhoods in the city. Walnut Hills has the potential to be a great neighborhood again, it just needs some attention and investment.
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Old 09-20-2011, 01:27 PM
 
8,689 posts, read 12,494,590 times
Reputation: 6156
I tried to buy a six family in Walnut Hills. It had been a wh***house. It was vacant and I made an offer. They turned it down. I went back with a buddy to re-evaluate it. Someone had stripped out all of the copper and six new water heaters. We lowered the offer. They turned it down. It was eventually torn down. That was in 1967. The same thing happens there today. Lovely houses, convenient location, great bargains, but nothing seems to change there.
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Old 09-20-2011, 02:03 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
472 posts, read 293,785 times
Reputation: 252
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wilson513 View Post
I tried to buy a six family in Walnut Hills. It had been a wh***house. It was vacant and I made an offer. They turned it down. I went back with a buddy to re-evaluate it. Someone had stripped out all of the copper and six new water heaters. We lowered the offer. They turned it down. It was eventually torn down. That was in 1967. The same thing happens there today. Lovely houses, convenient location, great bargains, but nothing seems to change there.
When was the Alms turned into low income apartments? I think its probably the biggest hinderence to the area. As much as I'd hate to see it torn down, I think doing that would be a huge benefit for the area, or at least convert it to something better as its in a pretty prime location. As OTR proved, High density subsidized housing never works.

The community council should be focused on cleaning up crime related to that building instead of tearing down everything, get the problem at the source not the edges.
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Old 09-20-2011, 02:27 PM
 
8,689 posts, read 12,494,590 times
Reputation: 6156
Quote:
Originally Posted by neilworms2 View Post
When was the Alms turned into low income apartments? I think its probably the biggest hinderence to the area. As much as I'd hate to see it torn down, I think doing that would be a huge benefit for the area, or at least convert it to something better as its in a pretty prime location. As OTR proved, High density subsidized housing never works.

The community council should be focused on cleaning up crime related to that building instead of tearing down everything, get the problem at the source not the edges.
Yea, I looked at the Alms for a client a couple of years ago. The paper work had photos of the inside and there were bullet holes and smashed doors and walls and whole areas inside that had been quarantined against crack heads and homeless persons squatting there. It was pretty shocking to say the least.
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