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Old 09-27-2011, 08:01 PM
 
1,130 posts, read 2,032,886 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
Yes, the real chili con carne, which litrerally means chili peppers with meat. Now that is about as wide open a definition as you can get. I guess since Cincinnati Chili contains no peppers it may not meet the definition of chili. But since I have eatern many other so-called chilis which do not contain peppers I guess they are excluded also.
Actually, at least some Cincinnati recipes contain peppers. I was once at the Empress in Hartwell (is that location still open?), and had a whole red chili pepper in my three way. It was a long skinny one. Looked like maybe a Cayenne.
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Old 09-27-2011, 08:21 PM
 
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Here's the thing about Cincinnati chili. Most of the local's love it, but to call it "chili" sets up a different expectation in the minds of outsiders. They don't get it. If we had a different name for it, they might be more accepting of it. I usually describe it to the uninitiated as a "savory meat sauce, Greek style." If you know anything about Greek cooking, then it should come as no surprise that it has spices in it like cinnamon or chocolate. Greeks use these things to season meats.

But, since you wanted a battle... did Cincinnati chili evolve here independently, or is there a connection with Milwaukee's Real Chili? Real Chili is nearly 20 years older than our first known Cincinnati chili parlor (which was Empress in 1922 and founded by two Macedonian brothers) and yet people recognize it as Cincinnati-style chili. In fact, I believe Real Chili may be even older than the Milwaukee version, and may have existed years earlier in Green Bay.

Interesting question, because even if it did come from Wisconsin, we eat more of it here, so we win.
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Old 09-27-2011, 11:01 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
Let's talk about the etiquette of eating Cincinncati Chili. First of all you do not twirl the spaghetti around the fork. This is not spaghetti and meal balls. You take the fork and slice down through the pile of cheese, onions, chili, and spaghetti until you reach the bottom of the plate and severe off a fork-full. Then carefully lift it to your mouth, savor, and repeat until extiguished.
It's easier to twirl kj ... and you can scoop up more cheese that way. Count me as a twirler.
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Old 09-28-2011, 06:57 AM
 
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Originally Posted by abr7rmj View Post
It's easier to twirl kj ... and you can scoop up more cheese that way. Count me as a twirler.
Dude, are you even from Cincinnati???
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Old 09-28-2011, 08:40 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
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The first time I ordered Cincinnati chili was quite unwittingly -- I had no idea what this stuff was; no one warned me. I was with a college friend at the Sun Bright Chili parlor in Lebanon, and I ordered a bowl of chili, expecting ... chili: big hunks of meat, tomato, pepper, beans. What I got was a bowl of ground up meat in a runny sauce. Imagine my horror ...

Years later when I moved to Lebanon and went to Sun Bright (aka "Sun Blight") at least I knew to order a club sandwich.

Of course, now there's nothing I love more than a five way. It's truly an acquired taste.
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Old 09-28-2011, 08:59 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
The first time I ordered Cincinnati chili was quite unwittingly -- I had no idea what this stuff was; no one warned me. I was with a college friend at the Sun Bright Chili parlor in Lebanon, and I ordered a bowl of chili, expecting ... chili: big hunks of meat, tomato, pepper, beans. What I got was a bowl of ground up meat in a runny sauce. Imagine my horror ...

Years later when I moved to Lebanon and went to Sun Bright (aka "Sun Blight") at least I knew to order a club sandwich.

Of course, now there's nothing I love more than a five way. It's truly an acquired taste.
I like both kinds of chili, but yeah, you don't really want to have a bowl of one kind set in front of you when what you're hungry for is the other. Fortunately, you can get tasty non-Greek style chili several places around town. Gaslight in Pleasant Ridge and Bacall's in College Hill come to mind. Although I think Gaslight has a little bit of cinnamon in their Texas style. Still good, though.
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Old 09-28-2011, 10:08 AM
 
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Originally Posted by t45209 View Post
Dude, are you even from Cincinnati???
Not originally.
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Old 09-28-2011, 10:31 AM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,420,983 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by t45209 View Post
But, since you wanted a battle... did Cincinnati chili evolve here independently, or is there a connection with Milwaukee's Real Chili? Real Chili is nearly 20 years older than our first known Cincinnati chili parlor (which was Empress in 1922 and founded by two Macedonian brothers) and yet people recognize it as Cincinnati-style chili. In fact, I believe Real Chili may be even older than the Milwaukee version, and may have existed years earlier in Green Bay.

Interesting question, because even if it did come from Wisconsin, we eat more of it here, so we win.
Real Chili in Milwaukee opened their first store in 1931 on the campus of Marquette University. The reason they claim a longer history is the original owner worked at Chili John's in Green Bay which opened in 1912 by a Lithuanian and is still in business. Chili John's taste is said to come from hot oil added to the meat. Hot oil is vegetable oil infused with dried ground chili peppers. Like our local competitors neither specifically identifies the exact spices used or the proportions. Chili John's has a single location but also markets a frozen product in local stores. Real Chili has 3 locations, 2 in Milwakee and 1 in Madison. One thing specific to Real Chili is they have bottles of vinegar to sprinkle on the chili.

While similar to our Cincinnati Chili in many ways they are different. They have managed to stay in business a long time but have not taken over their respective areas anywhere near like the Cincinnati variety.
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Old 09-28-2011, 11:06 AM
 
3,974 posts, read 5,560,410 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by abr7rmj View Post
Doesn't Cleveland have a Skyline now? Or a couple?
There are 3 in the area that I know of. 2 of them have been here for close to 15 years at least.

Quote:
You owe us an Alesci's in return. I'd settle for a Winking Lizard.
I wouldn't be too surprised if the Lizard eventually makes it's way down there.
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Old 09-28-2011, 12:39 PM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,420,983 times
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I know Gold Star states they have Tex-Mex chili on their menu. Anyone who has tried it care to comment? Did they start with ground meat and just spice it differently? If they started with ground meat I don't consider it Tex-Mex, there has to be recognizable chunks of meat in it.

I was looking at Gold Star's menu online since I have not been to one in awhile and I notice they advertise a Firehouse Way with roasted red pepper sauce and topped with a 5-pepper spice mix. Sounds like a real gastro nightmare later on, may even outdo White Castle Sliders.
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