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Old 10-08-2011, 04:07 PM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 14,073,068 times
Reputation: 1928

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Yes, I know the company has been sold several times. But I prefer the RedHot sauce to the whimp Tobasco. And RedHot has one claim to fame the others cannot make, it was the primary ingredient in the original Buffalo Chicken Wings operation in Buffalo Yew York.

And how many of you recall the original Mister Mustard. Boy it had a kick.
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Old 10-09-2011, 10:48 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
477 posts, read 555,887 times
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I might also add that Red Hot is by far the best hot sauce for Chili, perfectly compliments the flavor
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Old 10-10-2011, 12:52 PM
 
Location: A voice of truth, shouted down by fools.
1,086 posts, read 2,319,767 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
Yes, I know the company has been sold several times. But I prefer the RedHot sauce to the whimp Tobasco.
Tobasco's Scoville (heat intensity) rating is 2500-5000. Frank's is 499. (Both according to Wikipedia.) Personally, I could drink Frank's by the tablespoon and the vinegar in it would just give me heartburn, but Tobasco clings to the palate and is far more intense. Tobasco is an order of magnitude hotter than Frank's red hot in actual practice and the numbers above prove this. A few drops of Frank's in a bowl of chili won't be noticed... Tobasco most certainly will be.

Having said that, Frank's is very useful as the base of a wings sauce. They both taste great. Frank's is close to a main sauce for food... Tobasco *must* be diluted into food. Tobasco is just far more intense. Different uses, IMO.

Quote:
Originally Posted by neilworms2 View Post
I might also add that Red Hot is by far the best hot sauce for Chili, perfectly compliments the flavor
IMO for chili you need heat and flavor. Tobasco is so powerful that it's mainly a source of heat. Personally I prefer a blend of Frank's and Tobasco, which appears to be similar to the formulation of the table side stuff in glass bottles that they serve in Skyline restaurants. It is not as hot as Tobasco and it has some flavor, but it is far hotter than Frank's.

Actually, the best tasting mass market "hot sauce" I have found is the little red colored packets of Taco Bell "Fiery" sauce. It is fairly hot but has a lot of flavor. I grab a handful when we eat there and keep a stash in the refrigerator.
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Old 10-10-2011, 08:33 PM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 14,073,068 times
Reputation: 1928
The Scoville Rating of the Tabasco pepper itself may be high. But the result from what I obtain from most of the so-called Tabasco sauces I purchase in the market has no where near that pungency. I may find a tabasco sauce in a specialty market which more than yields the hot, but those I find in the typical supermarket fall far short. Does not surprise me since most supermarket offerings are oriented to the masses, and very hot spices are not the common denominator. I will still stay with my Frank's Redhot as a very enjoyable condiment.
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Old 10-10-2011, 09:09 PM
 
14,419 posts, read 24,452,031 times
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First, to alleviate some of the confusion, TABASCO is a trade name of the McIllhenny Company for their products which are produced on Avery Island, LA. There is NO GENERIC "Tabasco" sauce.

I have spent a lot of time in Iberia parish experiencing a great of Cajun cooking. Tabasco sauce is made to provide HEAT to dishes that ALREADY contain the flavor. Few in Louisiana use Tabasco as a sole source of flavor in a dish.

In Cincinnati, ORIGINAL Tabasco Sauce may be considered to be "powerful" but it is very mild. If you can't handle the original, try the Tabasco green sauce which is about as mild as you can get.

I have to admit that I have 2-3 bottles of every variety of Tabasco Sauce. However, I tend to use Cajun Power Garlic Sauce from Abbeville, LA a whole lot more often.
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Old 10-10-2011, 09:21 PM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 14,073,068 times
Reputation: 1928
I will have to admit a few things. Tabasco sauce predates Franks's Redhot, having been introduced in 1868 while Frank's was 1896. Maybe it was that little dinky perfume bottle Tabasco came in, and the price, which prevented me from using it to its full poential. The Frank's Redhot just seemed to beacon pile me on, which I did. Just loved the taste and had enough to permeate the whole dish.
As far as heat index, the current Frank's Redhot Xtra Hot will give anything a run for its money.

From all of this discussion I am going to have to go out a get a container of oil so I can break out my large deep fryer from its basement storage. I absolutely love Buffalo Wings. I have tried to bake them but the result is definitely so-so. I also have difficulty with the market wing sections, no matter what the brand name, Tyson, Kroger, Meijer, whatever. They just do not seem to cut the mustard. Not crispy enough, won't fall off the bone, just do not come up to the better wing joints in town.

If you have a good home recipe for Buffalo Wings and a place to obtain them, please chime in here.
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Old 10-10-2011, 11:06 PM
 
14,419 posts, read 24,452,031 times
Reputation: 20505
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
I will have to admit a few things. Tabasco sauce predates Franks's Redhot, having been introduced in 1868 while Frank's was 1896. Maybe it was that little dinky perfume bottle Tabasco came in, and the price, which prevented me from using it to its full poential. The Frank's Redhot just seemed to beacon pile me on, which I did. Just loved the taste and had enough to permeate the whole dish.

As far as heat index, the current Frank's Redhot Xtra Hot will give anything a run for its money.

If you want real pain, try this product which I tasted at the New Mexico State University's Chili Pepper Institute last October:

NMSU: The Chile Pepper Institute - Holy Jolokia


The real surprise is that the product is produced in Westerville, OH:

CaJohns Fiery Foods: Home


I was going to buy some jolokia seeds from NMSU - until I saw the growing instructions. The soil temperature needed to be kept no lower than 90F. Within a moment, I realized that growing them was well beyond my limited capabilities.

At NMSU, I met one of the researchers at the institute. She wanted to emphasize that the goal was to make more FLAVORFUL peppers, not hotter ones.
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Old 10-11-2011, 02:43 PM
 
Location: A voice of truth, shouted down by fools.
1,086 posts, read 2,319,767 times
Reputation: 903
I just can't wrap my brain around anyone claiming that a quantity of Frank's in a dish is hotter than an equal quantity of Tabasco. It's exactly the reverse. Frank's original sauce is mild. Tabasco applied as a dressing to wings in the same quantities in which you would use Frank's would basically ruin them for consumption. I use both regularly.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jlawrence01 View Post
I have spent a lot of time in Iberia parish experiencing a great of Cajun cooking. Tabasco sauce is made to provide HEAT to dishes that ALREADY contain the flavor. Few in Louisiana use Tabasco as a sole source of flavor in a dish.

In Cincinnati, ORIGINAL Tabasco Sauce may be considered to be "powerful" but it is very mild.
I agree with the first part. Tabasco is a heat, not primary flavor source.

I definitely disagree with the contention that Tabasco is "very mild." I do agree that it is not ultra-hot. The Scoville system ratings jibe pretty well with the mildness vs pain that I perceive among different sauces.

As far as a wing recipe:

I defrost thoroughly (if frozen) and pat very dry.

Season generously with salt and pepper.

Grill over hot charcoal in a closed grill with some wood chips for smoke. Turn and adjust the wing placements frequently. I contend that wings contain so much fat that they are self basting and the chicken fat will essentially fry the outside of the sections. But you need a hot fire to make this happen.

Dress with a mixture of about 1/3 melted margarine, 2/3 Frank's, plus anything else I want to toss in: a splash of Worcestershire and/or some garlic powder are favorites. To underscore the point about heat, if I want hotter wings, I add small dashes of Tabasco mixed into the dressing to bring up the heat level. It's usually not necessary, though.

Everyone in the pool, and serve.

Re: Ghost Peppers aka Jolokia - I prepare food, not SuperFund sites.

I've seen some souvenir, $50/bottle and up "distilled capsaicin" in specialized pepper and sauce stores. They usually are structured like an isolation cell: a little brown bottle that looks like an old fashioned iodine bottle, with a dropper, is packed inside a clear box, to isolate the handling of the box from the fluid in the bottle itself. And the labels will say things like summoning EMS if someone ingests the stuff and collapses, and to avoid "serving" to cardiac patients.

That's nuts...

Last edited by Ohioan58; 10-11-2011 at 03:00 PM..
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Old 10-11-2011, 05:11 PM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 14,073,068 times
Reputation: 1928
To grill chicken wings is news to me. Maybe I should try it.

My favorite wings are from wing joints, most of which are also bars. I am pretty sure they are deep fried. If I could duplicate their result at home I would be happy.I am having a problem finding the type of wings they fry up. The ones I find in the market are larger, and have a much higher percentage of connective tissue, i.e. gristle than the ones I purchase at the restaurant. Someone give me a source of good chicken wings, when deep fried, will produce the result at least comparable to a good chicken joint.

My extent of chicken on the grill are boneless breasts basted in BBQ sauce. Now that is something I like.
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