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Old 10-10-2011, 01:22 PM
 
Location: Covington, KY
1,880 posts, read 2,130,239 times
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Was anything like this in Cincinnati media?

It was in Yahoo Local News for Covington this morning (Columbus Day, 10/10/11).

Foreign insects, diseases got into US

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Old 10-10-2011, 05:13 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
31,292 posts, read 57,520,651 times
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I do believe kypost.com would qualify as "Cincinnati media".
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Old 10-10-2011, 07:37 PM
 
Location: Covington, KY
1,880 posts, read 2,130,239 times
Reputation: 595
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
I do believe kypost.com would qualify as "Cincinnati media".
I do believe both the Kentucky Post and the Kentucky Enquirer are administratively prohibited (news-wise) from the north side of the river.

Frankly, I don't remember which one I once asked and by which I was (then) firmly told they couldn't cover any such thing for said reason, but I do remember which one I more recently asked and I'm not saying which in either case in view of the quoted statement.

The question is legitimate. And, I am in Covington.

And, for those who don't understand.... Publications tailor their "offerings" to suit what they believe are the interests of the readership. In some cases this is nothing more than what is called "the local angle." In other cases it has to do with content.
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Old 10-11-2011, 09:23 AM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,406,804 times
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OP, you seem obsessed with bugs. I admit to not being terribly fond of them myself. For the entire time I have lived in my current house, every spring I have an invasion of crickets. Apparently they burrow into the ground surrounding my house and reemerge the next spring. They have an uncanny ability to get into the house. The chirping sound drives me nuts. Thankfully the cat is pretty good at searching them out and making a meal of them. I have tried to eradicate them, and maybe have held down the population, but a few always manage to survive.

The devastation caused by imported species is very real. The Emerald Ash Borer is a good example. It has been spreading across the US. Lebanon, which is 8 miles north of me, is now seeing their ash trees die due to the borer. I look at the magnificant white ash in my back yard and think your days are numbered. I remember years ago when the Dutch Elm Disease just about wiped out that entire species in the US.

If the article on Home Land Security is correct, and chasing potential terrorists has been their prerogative, we have been had. Tracking down and preventing invasive bugs and other diseases from invading our shores requires actual people out in the field inspecting shipments of products into the US. From what I can tell, tracking terrorism threats amounts to monitoring the talk on the internet, meaning they are sitting at a desk with a computer terminal somewhere.

If our current Home Land Security permits the invasion of foreign species of any kind to degrade our food production, floral habitat including trees, they have missed the objective. The name is Security for the Home Land. If you protect us against foreign invasions but surrender the means of our lifestyle in the process, you have failed!
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Old 10-11-2011, 11:38 AM
 
Location: Covington, KY
1,880 posts, read 2,130,239 times
Reputation: 595
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
OP, you seem obsessed with bugs. I admit to not being terribly fond of them myself. For the entire time I have lived in my current house, every spring I have an invasion of crickets. Apparently they burrow into the ground surrounding my house and reemerge the next spring. They have an uncanny ability to get into the house. The chirping sound drives me nuts. Thankfully the cat is pretty good at searching them out and making a meal of them. I have tried to eradicate them, and maybe have held down the population, but a few always manage to survive.

The devastation caused by imported species is very real. The Emerald Ash Borer is a good example. It has been spreading across the US. Lebanon, which is 8 miles north of me, is now seeing their ash trees die due to the borer. I look at the magnificant white ash in my back yard and think your days are numbered. I remember years ago when the Dutch Elm Disease just about wiped out that entire species in the US.

If the article on Home Land Security is correct, and chasing potential terrorists has been their prerogative, we have been had. Tracking down and preventing invasive bugs and other diseases from invading our shores requires actual people out in the field inspecting shipments of products into the US. From what I can tell, tracking terrorism threats amounts to monitoring the talk on the internet, meaning they are sitting at a desk with a computer terminal somewhere.

If our current Home Land Security permits the invasion of foreign species of any kind to degrade our food production, floral habitat including trees, they have missed the objective. The name is Security for the Home Land. If you protect us against foreign invasions but surrender the means of our lifestyle in the process, you have failed!
Truthfully, I haven't quite figured out how to answer you. Maybe I can clarify later.

I read the Dayton Daily News, WDTN, etc., much more than anything in Cincinnati and saw the news about the ash borer somewhere, presumably the DDN. And, yes, that's not the first such thing that came along.

On a more personal level, my apartment is on the fifth floor and there's nothing like a tree right outside of the windows. Not this year but in the recent past, with the windows shut, I was finding two and three of the tannish-gray ladybug like creatures every couple of days. Now, it's not too possible to do this without thinking something like, "Where are these bugs coming from?" (That's above and beyond things like bed bugs.)

I'm not obsessed with bugs. I'm very seriously concerned when there's an over-abundance for no apparent reason.

Presumably the story has some substantial foundation. It came from the Associated Press. And, while a lot of it refers to the coastal regions of the country, at the end it says it was contributed to by someone in Indianapolis. That's in Indiana, i.e., next door.
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Old 10-17-2011, 06:58 AM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,406,804 times
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Our eco structure maintains a delicate balance. The invasion of foreign specifies is a definite concern. Everything from snails hitchhiking on the hulls of ships and then multiplying at such a rate they clog city water inlet pipes in the great lakes to plants which choke out native vegetation in the Florida swamps, to fish which take over our fresh water habitats. The invsion of foreign insects can be simply from their boring into wooden shipping pallets and crates for cargo or the cargo itself. It takes a lot of dilligence, plus money, to detect and prevent such occurrences.

When you add the concerns over the use of herbicides and pesticides you have a signficant problem. We used to hear about the Dept. of the Interior as being the guardian of our natural resources. Now, it seems all attention is on Homeland Security. It has become a little fuzzy to me where the boundaries are.

During the time in my current house, I have endured invasions of ladybugs and yellowjackets. The yellowjackets folowed the grout lines from our first floor brick up underneath the 2nd floor siding and established colonies between the 2nd floor joists. They were a real problem to exterminate. The ladybugs followed a similar pattern. reproducing in the hollow 2nd floor walls. I would suddenly notice ladybugs on the interior walls as they came in via small cracks around our original windows. The ladybugs were more of a nuisance while the yellowjackets were plain nasty as they have a good sting. Neither one of these are now considered a foreign species, but I do not want them around in abundance regardless.
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Old 10-18-2011, 11:24 AM
 
Location: Covington, KY
1,880 posts, read 2,130,239 times
Reputation: 595
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
Our eco structure maintains a delicate balance. The invasion of foreign specifies is a definite concern. Everything from snails hitchhiking on the hulls of ships and then multiplying at such a rate they clog city water inlet pipes in the great lakes to plants which choke out native vegetation in the Florida swamps, to fish which take over our fresh water habitats. The invsion of foreign insects can be simply from their boring into wooden shipping pallets and crates for cargo or the cargo itself. It takes a lot of dilligence, plus money, to detect and prevent such occurrences.

When you add the concerns over the use of herbicides and pesticides you have a signficant problem. We used to hear about the Dept. of the Interior as being the guardian of our natural resources. Now, it seems all attention is on Homeland Security. It has become a little fuzzy to me where the boundaries are.

During the time in my current house, I have endured invasions of ladybugs and yellowjackets. The yellowjackets folowed the grout lines from our first floor brick up underneath the 2nd floor siding and established colonies between the 2nd floor joists. They were a real problem to exterminate. The ladybugs followed a similar pattern. reproducing in the hollow 2nd floor walls. I would suddenly notice ladybugs on the interior walls as they came in via small cracks around our original windows. The ladybugs were more of a nuisance while the yellowjackets were plain nasty as they have a good sting. Neither one of these are now considered a foreign species, but I do not want them around in abundance regardless.

Apparently this year it's a plump, dark grayish flying critter with a white bottom that's about an inch long and a half of an inch wide. The building's concrete block. They can't be getting in like your yellowjackets and ladybugs. But, I know what you mean -- our house once had honeybees there.

The thing here is, evidently no one noticed any such story in the Cincinnati media.... Now, the first thing I thought of was that the things mentioned were probably not the only new things on the horizon.
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