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Old 11-04-2011, 10:46 PM
 
13,730 posts, read 22,887,366 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sarah Perry View Post
No expert on parochial schools, but I know two things. Performance measures for inner-city parochial schools with a large percentage of poor/minority/voucher students aren't so great. Not all schools are St. X just because of a certain religious affiliation. AND you better not say anything even remotely perceived as negative about Catholic schools around here. Too many people will take it personally.
If you are comparing inner-city parochial students with schools in the state as a whole, they probably underperform. Education begins at home.

On the other hand, if compared with public inner-city schools, they generally do quite well.

Sort of defensive, aren't you?
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Old 11-05-2011, 12:48 AM
 
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The first new Catholic HS in Cincinnati in 50 years will prove that even urban parochial schools are superior to government schools.

Preparing Students for College Success
For the classes of 2008 and 2009, 85% of Cristo Rey Network graduates are enrolled in college two years after high school (source: National Student Clearinghouse).

This is twice the rate of our students’ peers of the same socioeconomic background.
Nationally, for the class of 2006, 61% of all high school graduates matriculated in a post secondary institution after high school graduation.
For African American high school graduates, the number was slightly more than 40%, and for Hispanic students the number was slightly under 40%.


Start here to learn about these exciting new schools:

Cristo Rey Network
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Old 11-05-2011, 02:45 PM
 
6,351 posts, read 18,908,944 times
Reputation: 9895
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wilson513 View Post
There is a reason for that. And, the union owned demorat politicians have it set up to fail. It comparing apples with tadpoles.

First, the "charter schools" operate on less than half the $$ per student that CPS does. Second, parents do not get a voucher that they can use at their choice. They must spend it at a "participating charter school." They cannot spend the vouchers on existing private and religious affiliated schools. So, what you are left with is a new schools, formed by sometimes idealistic, sometimes opportunistic, persons run on a shoestring. Even so, I think you will find tremendous loyalty to some of these charter schools.

I think with St. Xavier HS costing no more than CPS, if you gave parents a voucher for what it is really costing CPS to educate the kids, no one would choose CPS. For a couple thousand plus the voucher you could send tyour kids to Country Day. Schools like Purcell cost half as much as CPS spends. Vouchers would work if they really were vouchers and not ghetto coupons.
First of all, charter schools aren't going to fix stupid students and parents. And many of them won't have to fund some of the programs and requirements that public schools, by law, must provide. AND, they are allowed to accept only the best students while public schools must accept all comers.

Many charter schools are set up to enrich the entrepreneur or investor group by hiring the cheapest teachers they can find. Yeah, you can get good teachers in a down economy for peanuts. But charter schools are mostly just another way for the fat cats to kep the wealth in as few hands as possible...

Last edited by Crew Chief; 11-05-2011 at 10:40 PM..
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Old 11-05-2011, 03:41 PM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,389,317 times
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Everytime I hear someone knock parochial schools, most but not all Catholic, it frosts me. Here are parents forking out tuition and also spending a lot of extra time at fundraising to support such as athletics while at the same time paying taxes to support public schools.

I was Catholic by background but frankly unwilling to spend the extra for a parochial education for my children. I just could not see the sense in it. Of course my older children went to Madeira and then all of them finished at Mason. No problemo.

But vouchers should be issued to all equivalent to the cost of education per pupil in the district in which they live. You can either spend the vouchers with the public system or elsewhere. I can guarantee you such a system would revolutionize education as we now know it.

But here is the problem as I propose it. If vouchers were enabled for all, quickly tax levies for schools would be voted down in droves. This would result in the vouchers being reduced. But I ask is that all bad? Most businesses have to survive on the service or product they produce, but not the schools. It is time they were required to change.
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Old 11-05-2011, 04:19 PM
 
6,351 posts, read 18,908,944 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
Everytime I hear someone knock parochial schools, most but not all Catholic, it frosts me. Here are parents forking out tuition and also spending a lot of extra time at fundraising to support such as athletics while at the same time paying taxes to support public schools.

I was Catholic by background but frankly unwilling to spend the extra for a parochial education for my children. I just could not see the sense in it. Of course my older children went to Madeira and then all of them finished at Mason. No problemo.

But vouchers should be issued to all equivalent to the cost of education per pupil in the district in which they live. You can either spend the vouchers with the public system or elsewhere. I can guarantee you such a system would revolutionize education as we now know it.

But here is the problem as I propose it. If vouchers were enabled for all, quickly tax levies for schools would be voted down in droves. This would result in the vouchers being reduced. But I ask is that all bad? Most businesses have to survive on the service or product they produce, but not the schools. It is time they were required to change.
I feel the same frustration as you do, KJBrill. I don't have an answer for districts like CPS where they have both inefficiency in thier operation AND social problems beyond their control that they cannot fix. There are no easy fixes for our educational dilemma. Perhaps if the public schools can return to the discipline standards that Catholic schools used to have...
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Old 11-05-2011, 05:15 PM
 
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Local tax levies are inherently unfair once you accept the premise of government schools. If the government is going to provide public eduction, why should it be a different education if you live in Indian Hill or Goshen? Should there be some uniformity? If the State of Ohio mandates how many days they must attend, what the courses they are taught, teacher qualifications, etc., should it be the State that pays?
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Old 11-06-2011, 07:41 AM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,389,317 times
Reputation: 1920
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wilson513 View Post
Local tax levies are inherently unfair once you accept the premise of government schools. If the government is going to provide public eduction, why should it be a different education if you live in Indian Hill or Goshen? Should there be some uniformity? If the State of Ohio mandates how many days they must attend, what the courses they are taught, teacher qualifications, etc., should it be the State that pays?
That all sounds altruistic, but the fact remains the State can only pay for what its citizens agree to be taxed for. If you force strict uniformity, the citizens will just buckle down and refuse to pay. The government may mandate schools, but they still have to pay for them. They do everything they can think of to declare equality, but beyound a certain point there will be a rebellion and their financial structure will collapse.
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Old 11-07-2011, 06:12 AM
 
10,139 posts, read 22,461,010 times
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This is all you need to know about just how bad CPS is:

Parents Camp Out For Spot at Magnet Schools



Parents Camp Out For Spot at Magnet Schools - :: Cincinnati news story :: LOCAL 12 WKRC-TV in Cincinnati
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Old 12-30-2011, 01:05 AM
 
2 posts, read 1,674 times
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As one of those CPS parents who camped out, I respectfully think you need to shut up about things you aren't involved in.

If camping out overnight to ensure my child(ren) a spot in a magnet school is bad, then I most certainly don't want to be good. Our school is rated Excellent, has a wonderful community of parents, teachers, faculty and staff who work hard every day to give our children the best education possible, and offers a diverse, alternative education that I feel blessed to be able to offer my children.
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Old 12-30-2011, 07:04 AM
 
405 posts, read 651,564 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Westsiders View Post
As one of those CPS parents who camped out, I respectfully think you need to shut up about things you aren't involved in.

If camping out overnight to ensure my child(ren) a spot in a magnet school is bad, then I most certainly don't want to be good. Our school is rated Excellent, has a wonderful community of parents, teachers, faculty and staff who work hard every day to give our children the best education possible, and offers a diverse, alternative education that I feel blessed to be able to offer my children.
I don't think Wilson513 was saying camping out is bad, but that you have to do something so extreme to get a decent education in the CPS system is an indicator that the system itself is bad.
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