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Old 11-16-2011, 05:01 AM
 
8 posts, read 13,279 times
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For anyone who can answer this truthfully:
My girlfriend and I are from the Boston area (about 25 miles south) We absolutely can not stand how rude the people are here. Whether it's cutting you off and flipping you off, staring at you for no reason, being a "m@sshole" or only caring about yourself. I have been to Cincinnati before and the residents seemed genuinely friendly. the Bengals and Reds are our favorite football and baseball teams. I was just wondering how it would be for someone moving from such a rude area to this city to escape the rudeness would be. I have read multiple posts on this board to compare and contrast how it is, but I have not gotten a definite answer. I understand there are nice people and rude people everywhere. Do the number of friendly people outweigh the number of rude people? I read how you have to be in a clique to "belong" Where I'm from no one gives a damn about you. How is the job market and the traffic? It takes 35 minutes to drive 5 miles where I live. There is concealed racism and the school system completely sucks. It costs $800 a month for a 1 bedroom rabbit run apartment. Any incite on us moving here would be greatly appreciated.
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Old 11-16-2011, 07:35 AM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,358,349 times
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I understand you inquiry, and must confess to a variety of responses.

The traffic situation in Cincinnati is nowhere close to the Boston area. Baring accidents, exteme weather, etc. I can get from my location 20 miles morth of Cincinnati to the CVG airport across the river in KY, going through downtown, about 35 miles total, in about 45 minutes, home to parking.

I was born and raised in Cincinnati, so naturally I am biased. I consider the majority of Cincinnatians as very friendly people and welcoming to newcomers. As far as cliques, this is my opinion.

In the rapidly expanding outer suburbs such as where I live, there has simply been no time for cliques to form. The long term residents lament the fact the area is changing so rapidly they are no longer recognized. Great, that means someone does not continue to be reelected just because of their name. I have noticed great changes in terms of diversity in my surroundings, race and origin. I recognize our area is not cheap, and most of these diversified newcomers have professional careers.

Some areas of Cincinnati are cliquish, usually oriented around country of origin (German or Irish), religion (Catholic), relocation (such as the appliachians relocating here when the coal mines ran out in WVA). But these effects are definiely being diluted in the current era.

Post some specific desires and see what responses you get. Cincinnati is a great place to live, but it is also varied depending on location.
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Old 11-16-2011, 07:53 AM
 
8 posts, read 13,279 times
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Thanks for your insight. My girlfriend is graduating with her bachelors this spring and is looking to go to graduate school. We are both in our early 20's and have no experience with moving (never mind to an entirely new city). Are there areas of the city that are dominated by young professionals? Where would you say are the best places to rent? I have read mixed reviews about the crime of the city and would like to know your opinion as a lifelong resident.

Where we live there are taxes on EVERYTHING! We call it Taxachusetts with good reason. Are you required to pay excise tax on your car? What are the property taxes like in the area?
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Old 11-16-2011, 08:12 AM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,358,349 times
Reputation: 1919
Quote:
Originally Posted by WhoDave14 View Post
Thanks for your insight. My girlfriend is graduating with her bachelors this spring and is looking to go to graduate school. We are both in our early 20's and have no experience with moving (never mind to an entirely new city). Are there areas of the city that are dominated by young professionals? Where would you say are the best places to rent? I have read mixed reviews about the crime of the city and would like to know your opinion as a lifelong resident.

Where we live there are taxes on EVERYTHING! We call it Taxachusetts with good reason. Are you required to pay excise tax on your car? What are the property taxes like in the area?
I am 72 yrs old and therefore not the best to offer specifics on young professional environments. But I feel many will offer the Clifton Gaslight area as a place to locate. Recognize anyway they want to disguise it, this is dominated by the University of Cincinnati, either students or faculty. If not for the university it would not exist.

Another area is OTR (Over the Rhine) section of downtown Cincinnati. This was once the most dense populous district in Cincinnati. It fell into disrepair, but is making a comeback.

Another area is the Banks near the riverfront. From what I can tell it is about to lease out quickly.

If she is going to graduate school, which - UC or Xavier? I don't mean to slight NKU, but these are the norms. If Xavier some other respondents may give you some closeby recommendations.
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Old 11-16-2011, 08:48 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
3,335 posts, read 5,725,886 times
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I was taken aback by the friendliness of people when I returned here after living out west. People are generally overtly friendly, say 'hi' to strangers, open doors, and generally greatly acknowledge one anothers presence.

Regarding cliques, I'm not sure if that is the right word - but a lot of people in Cincinnati have family, school, and friend connections going back many years. That said, my wife and I have found it very easy to make friends and have made more friends in a year here than we have made everywhere else we have lived combined, excluding of course the towns where we grew up where we have schoolhood friends.

I think the key to transitioning successfully is moving to a neighborhood with young people who are active and just get out-and-about. A number of City neighborhoods come to mind - Hyde Park and most adjacent neighborhoods, Northside, Clifton (both gaslight and CUF) and increasingly Over the Rhine (south of Liberty). The Pleasant Ridge / Silverton area can work too, but it will be a bit quieter and more family-oriented, though there is still plenty going on.

If you have some tolerance for crime (a bike left out will likely get stolen, etc.), Northside, OTR, and CUF would be my top picks. Something that happens in these more "transitional" type neighborhoods is that the residents really look out for each other and know one another well. "I LOVE Cincinnati die-hard" types are in abundance in these places and that scene alone allows for plenty of socializing / going out / etc

You'll find many of the same urban/old city issues in Cincinnati as you have in Boston, for better or worse. We have great cultural institutions but also seemingly unresovable problems of crime, segregation, poverty, abandonment, and so forth - though it is getting better. Perhaps unlike Boston, we go through the days greeting one another, making new friends, and generally trying to make each others lives more pleasant. Plus housing costs less, though perhaps not as cheap as some might expect.
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Old 11-16-2011, 11:15 AM
 
2,492 posts, read 3,652,150 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
I am 72 yrs old and therefore not the best to offer specifics on young professional environments. But I feel many will offer the Clifton Gaslight area as a place to locate. Recognize anyway they want to disguise it, this is dominated by the University of Cincinnati, either students or faculty. If not for the university it would not exist.

Another area is OTR (Over the Rhine) section of downtown Cincinnati. This was once the most dense populous district in Cincinnati. It fell into disrepair, but is making a comeback.

Another area is the Banks near the riverfront. From what I can tell it is about to lease out quickly.

If she is going to graduate school, which - UC or Xavier? I don't mean to slight NKU, but these are the norms. If Xavier some other respondents may give you some closeby recommendations.
Good post, this ^

kjbrill offers a good starting point. I'd also recommend looking into Hyde Park, Oakley and Mount Lookout, though those neighborhoods can get a bit pricey. Nothing like Boston expensive though.
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Old 11-16-2011, 12:01 PM
 
5,807 posts, read 10,337,835 times
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I think Cincinnati is one of the most underrated cities in the nation.

I first became interested in learning more about the city about a year ago, as I have some aquaintances in the Chicago area that are from Cincinnati (only 5 hours away).

I believe the cities of Ohio, Michigan and other metro areas of the industrial midwest can provide some of the best quality of life if you are looking for cities that have plenty of access to culture and fun at the same time having great suburban hometowns to raise a family in, while getting the best bang for your buck.

Cincinnati in particular I think it rather unique. And while the instances of cliquishness, conservatism, and even possibly racism may be real, there are MORE than enough opportunities to avoid all that.

1. The area is not ethnically diverse in the way that many other metro areas on the coast would be, or even the Great Lakes cities of the Chicago, Cleveland, or Detroit would be. the population is mostly black and white. And more specifically white people of northern Europe ancestry. Mostly German, some Irish, and a heavy dose of Appalachian/Scots Irish.

The latter influence (Appalachian) many people seem to think that makes it a negative. But that influence is just a part of diversity as any other group. In fact from what I can tell, the fact that Appalachians were disadvantaged and discriminated against and lived in poor neighborhoods with social problems, means that at their best, they can relate better to African Americans more than other white groups.

2. You will notive in Cincinnati that unlike cities like Chicago or Detroit, there is less one whole side of town that is good, one whole side that is not good. In Cincinnati, as you go from downtown outward, you go through nice areas . . . then a little ghetto, . . . nice area, then a little ghetto . . . and so on.
That in and of itself doesn't sound good, but I think its good because people who live in the real nice neighborhoods are at the very least aware of the bad areas, because they may have to drive through them as they go between their neighborhood and downtown. It feels somewhat egalitarian or "we're in this together"

You will also find that Cincinnatis urban architecture is more like what you would see on the east coast rather than the midwest, because Cincinnati got big before Chicago, etc.

3. Cincinnati while having a public school system, as with many other cities that may not be the best, Cincinnati does have one of the best MAGNET school system in the country. For example the School of Creative and Performing Arts is world class. Check out the wikipedia entry.

Cincys SCPA has been a model for racial integration and a comprehensive K-12 creative and performing arts schools all across the country. Only NYCs equivalent is older/bigger, etc. Several celebrities got their career launched at SCPA (Nick Lachey, Carmen Electra, Sarah Jessica Paker). I don't necessarily care for their music, shows or whatever, but do find it impressive that a school can launch those kinds of careers.

4. Cincinnati, while not necessarily an economic dynamo, has a diverse economy, with globally important corporations, that bring in people from all over the country and all over the world. Proctor and Gamble leads the list, the largest consumer goods corporations in the world. We all look and smell better because of Proctor and Gamble. And the women of the world have nice looking and smelling hair.

Other major corporations headquartered here include Macys, Kroger (groceries), 5/3 Bank, (PNC and US Bank have a major presence), Cintas, Chiquita bananas might be moving.


Also, the first MLB team in the nation started here. The Reds used to be the Red Stockings.

Cincinnati may not have an NBA team, but college basketball is huge, with the crosstown rivalry between the Xavier and U of Cincy (bearcats).

It may not be the most "wowwing" city/center of it all city in the country, but it is one of Americas best kept secrets.
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Old 11-16-2011, 04:14 PM
 
Location: Northern Arizona
1,248 posts, read 2,999,514 times
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Cincinnati is great if you're a college basketball fan. Not only are there UC and Xavier, but UK is an hour and a half south, University of Dayton is an hour north, Notre Dame is huge in Cincinnati thanks to the Catholic connection, and Ohio State's an hour and a half north.
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Old 11-16-2011, 04:21 PM
 
2,492 posts, read 3,652,150 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buckeyenative01 View Post
Cincinnati is great if you're a college basketball fan. Not only are there UC and Xavier, but UK is an hour and a half south, University of Dayton is an hour north, Notre Dame is huge in Cincinnati thanks to the Catholic connection, and Ohio State's an hour and a half north.
Don't forget Northern Kentucky, a powerhouse in the lower divisions that is planning to jump to D1 next year, and Miami, which also calls the Cincinnati area home. And there are plenty of Louisville and Indiana fans here too.
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Old 11-16-2011, 11:29 PM
 
8 posts, read 13,279 times
Reputation: 11
I keep reading on the city to compare and contrast the pros and cons. I've been using crimereports.com and neighborhood scout to gather information. Neighborhood scout rated Cincinnati a 4 out of 100 for safeness. The site also said the city has one of the highest murder rates in the country. I was just wondering how most of these murders occur? Is it being in the wrong place at the wrong time? Gang related? I even went to the city website to see which areas the most crime happens in. Like I said in a previous post, I visited here and didn't feel as if I was going to be murdered or mugged. I was only there for 3 days, though. I just wouldn't want to move somewhere where you would be at risk for no reason. Not putting the city down at all, I'm just not very familiar with it.
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