U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Ohio > Cincinnati
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-05-2012, 09:07 PM
 
13,727 posts, read 22,868,784 times
Reputation: 18558

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by jmecklenborg View Post
Anyone who moves further from Cincinnati, or goes through the hassle of moving to another state to save on property tax, is pennywise but pound foolish. One's transportation costs inevitably go up as one moves out further for lower property tax and "more house". There are also many scenarios, like distance from hospitals/fire/police, that might make a big difference in the case of a sudden health problem. Chronic health problems that require repeated visits to a specialist in the city also add to transportation costs.
You might be surprised that most of the suburban hospitals have specialists and that all of the healthcare in the Cincinnati is NOT located in Clifton (partially as many of the doctors prefer to live outside the city).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-05-2012, 09:50 PM
 
800 posts, read 698,172 times
Reputation: 552
I am aware that some of the suburban hospitals are doing some of the more specialized things that only the city hospitals did in the past. This is in part because the population is fat because of suburbs.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-06-2012, 10:08 AM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,381,264 times
Reputation: 1920
Sarah... Why is it that NKY property taxes are considerably less than Ohio? The cost of everything people need, food, clothing, healthcare, vehicles, utilities, etc has to be about the same. So you would think public sector employees have to be paid about the same. So what holds the property taxes down?

I know some people in some very nice newer subdivisions down around Union, and from what they say the prices of houses pretty much reflects the same house here in Ohio and the taxes are not all that cheap. I don't know about their schools, but my thinking says the same thing may be happening there as Blue Ash, Montgomery, Mason, and West Chester. Most of them have located there because it is closer to their jobs.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-06-2012, 10:34 AM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,381,264 times
Reputation: 1920
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmecklenborg View Post
I am aware that some of the suburban hospitals are doing some of the more specialized things that only the city hospitals did in the past. This is in part because the population is fat because of suburbs.
When you reflect fat, which variety are you speaking of, physically or monetarily? Definitely the doctors follow the money. The suburban hospitals within close access to me are surrounded with so many medical specialists offices it is sometimes difficult to locate the hospital.

My wife has an acute health problem, both Diabetes and Debilitating Rheumatoid Arthritis. Between the two she is in constant pain. All of her attending physicians are within one-half hour of us, and yes they are spead out. But as I write this, she is with her caregiver, attempting to get in at least a half hour of exercise in the pool at our Mason Community Center followed by a light lunch in their coffee shop before returning home. That is why I say don't knock the suburbs for the elderly, at least they are not being ignored by uppies wanting to transform the urban environment into just, progressive, white, and rich.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-06-2012, 10:51 AM
 
5,319 posts, read 6,624,394 times
Reputation: 2657
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
Sarah... Why is it that NKY property taxes are considerably less than Ohio? The cost of everything people need, food, clothing, healthcare, vehicles, utilities, etc has to be about the same. So you would think public sector employees have to be paid about the same. So what holds the property taxes down?

Less government waste/pork barrel projects/bureaucracy? Not paying for new football/baseball stadiums?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-06-2012, 11:35 AM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,381,264 times
Reputation: 1920
Quote:
Originally Posted by ram2 View Post
Less government waste/pork barrel projects/bureaucracy? Not paying for new football/baseball stadiums?
Yes, that may be a factor, but cannot be the whole answer. The new YUM stadium in Louisville may be in trouble since its financing bonds are close to be devalued which will make the long term interest go up.

I was seriously trying to determine why the NKY property tax could be lower. My first thought was maybe because they refuse to fund their schools. I only say this cause I keep hearing comments about how the NKY schools are inferior, I have no personal knowledge one way or the other.

So I do a search on teachers salaries in KY. I come up with several results and when I average them get $49,000 per year is the average teacher public school salary in KY. What caught my eye though was the statement this is 145% of the average individual income in KY. So the poor teachers in KY are making almost 50% more than the average worker. Just what I expected, quit telling me about the underpaid teachers.

I thought I better compare this to Ohio. The numbers I got was the average public school teacher salary in Ohio is $56,000.

But the problem with this is it is just averages, and they are dangerous.

So I still want to hear from respondents, not just those desiring to portray they are smarter or their politicians more efficient (because from what I have observed that is not true), why is NKY property taxes lower than Ohio? They are either shirking or ignoring the problems of infrastructure or are just plain dumb.

So say it is just so smart they did not build the stadiums in Cincinnati, them my reaction is OK let's build a toll booth into the areas around both GAPB and PBS and if you are not from Hamilton Co. this is your fee to enter. In my mind fairness needs to be applied. The residents of Hamilton Co were sold a billl of goods and unfortunately most it of they bought. But they should not be the ones holding the bag long term.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-06-2012, 11:46 AM
 
307 posts, read 441,476 times
Reputation: 98
Without researching The specifics I'd imagine legacies cost of government employment/pensions etc to be a large reason for this. This is something that all states are going thru and the larger the state the more amplified this problem will be. Its one of the larger growth areas in the defense budget and until it can be figured out in all aspects of govt I don't see things getting better. I also make no claim to have any answers one way or another.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-06-2012, 11:51 AM
 
800 posts, read 698,172 times
Reputation: 552
The stadiums bonds are being repaid with a 1/2 cent sales tax enacted in 1996 that generates about $60 million annually, not property taxes (except last year, when a small amount of property taxes were used). In fact a residential property tax rollback was enacted that same year to offset the higher sales tax for county residents. However, CityBeat did an anaylysis this year of the rollback and proved that the deal favored the wealthy. This rollback only saves the owner of a $100,000 home something like $50/year, but the county commissioners, especially Chris Monzel, are corrupt and used this artifical crisis to engineer the sale of Drake Hospital. I've long been of the opinion that Hamilton County should have never enacted this rollback and instead should have applied the excess revenue to the stadium bonds and The Banks project, as nobody would have missed the $50, and since that vote back in 1996 passed by such a wide margin, this carrot was totally unecessary.

Hamilton County has several special property taxes levied for health issues, including one (the name escapes me at the moment) that is a legacy of the Boss Cox era, when the City of Cincinnati built General Hospital (now University Hospital) and gave away free health care to all citizens. This service (sort of a proto-Medicaid) started around 1915 and caused a significant financial strain that, among other things, set the stage for the collapse of the Cox/Hynicka regime and the scuttling of the subway project (General Hospital was, by 1920, costing the city $600,000 out of an annual budget of about $30 million). At some point this service was transfered to the county, and it continued even after Medicaid started in the 1960s. Hamilton County is one of the only places in America where public support exists for the uninsured in this way, and I know people who have received reimbursement from it to pay steep medical bills. I have not heard any discussion of the future of this program, since one of the central features of ObamaCare is that some people above the federal poverty level (113% is the figure I have heard, but have not read yet) will qualify for Medicaid for the first time.

The other item nobody talks about in Cincinnati is the $1 billion CPS capital bond issue, which voters approved back in 2003 or 2004. This paid for the renovation or reconstruction of every school in the Cincinnati school district. I don't agree with what CPS has done at all, but it's useful to note that this program has cost the region as much public money as the stadiums, but nobody talks about it because the expense is hidden in property taxes. Also, the boundaries of Cincinnati Public does in some cases extend outside the city limits, but it does not comprise all of Hamilton County.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-06-2012, 12:43 PM
 
2,886 posts, read 3,957,501 times
Reputation: 1499
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese9988 View Post
I've been looking around on Zillow.com for general home prices and value. They seem to vary wildly even within the same neighborhood. How has the housing market been doing down there?

How are the taxes structured? Are there websites besides Zillow that can get me the rates?
Zillow uses some type of model that, in my experience, can result in wildly incorrect estimates of home value. For example, with my own home apparently the sample size for comparables isn't large enough to meet their criteria, so they lump in some completely unrelated nearby neighborhoods.

I'd say it's pretty much worthless in terms of home values. You're better off checking the Hamilton County auditor's site for individual properties' sale price records.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-06-2012, 12:50 PM
 
2,886 posts, read 3,957,501 times
Reputation: 1499
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
Sarah... Why is it that NKY property taxes are considerably less than Ohio? The cost of everything people need, food, clothing, healthcare, vehicles, utilities, etc has to be about the same. So you would think public sector employees have to be paid about the same. So what holds the property taxes down?

I know some people in some very nice newer subdivisions down around Union, and from what they say the prices of houses pretty much reflects the same house here in Ohio and the taxes are not all that cheap. I don't know about their schools, but my thinking says the same thing may be happening there as Blue Ash, Montgomery, Mason, and West Chester. Most of them have located there because it is closer to their jobs.
I really don't know how to answer this question without researching the large, overall picture comparing how Ohio and Kentucky get their respective revenues. I frankly have never even figured out how to determine if my own household's total tax burden would be higher or lower in Kentucky than in Ohio.

That said, I suspect my husband's and my next--and final--home move will be across the river. His pension is exempt from Kentucky income tax, and the lower property tax will be a help to our largely fixed income as retirees. If I had it to do over again, despite liking our home and neighborhood, I wouldn't buy in the City of Cincinnati. It's really not a good place for middle-income people to invest in a home. The city government's just too mired in corruption and incompetence.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Ohio > Cincinnati
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top