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Old 02-06-2012, 04:06 PM
 
465 posts, read 356,178 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ram2 View Post
That is why many from eastern Hamilton county moved to western Clermont county over the past 15 years - lower property taxes.
Without evidence of this claim, I don't believe you.
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Old 02-06-2012, 04:10 PM
 
5,314 posts, read 6,612,461 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Matthew Hall View Post
Without evidence of this claim, I don't believe you.
What kind of evidence do you want - handwritten letters from people who moved to Clermont county?
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Old 02-06-2012, 07:00 PM
 
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Again, moving somewhere rural for low taxes is a fool's errand. Intelligent people recognize that there are serious drawbacks to moving to low tax areas, and don't move their residences or businesses there.

If the Tea Party was right, then every corporate headquarters would have moved out of Manhattan decades ago. Instead, New York City remains the center of world affairs, despite a city income tax that varies between 2.9% and 3.6% depending on income.
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Old 02-06-2012, 07:05 PM
 
465 posts, read 356,178 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ram2 View Post
What kind of evidence do you want - handwritten letters from people who moved to Clermont county?
You suggested that the population of eastern hamilton county had reduced by 50%. let's see your evidence. If you don't have any, you can't say it. Of course, you have no idea and just WANT it to be true. I'm just calling you on it.
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Old 02-06-2012, 07:21 PM
 
13,710 posts, read 22,832,449 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jmecklenborg View Post
Again, moving somewhere rural for low taxes is a fool's errand. Intelligent people recognize that there are serious drawbacks to moving to low tax areas, and don't move their residences or businesses there.

If the Tea Party was right, then every corporate headquarters would have moved out of Manhattan decades ago. Instead, New York City remains the center of world affairs, despite a city income tax that varies between 2.9% and 3.6% depending on income.

Actually, a good portion of the financial industry, including much of the "back office processing, has moved to South Dakota (Citicorp) and other low tax states as well as sites overseas.
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Old 02-06-2012, 07:32 PM
 
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Wrong. The Manhattan office market is still robust. There is hardly any vacant building of any kind in Manhattan, and huge towers were going up by the dozen up until the collapse.

Similarly, there are hardly any vacant buildings in downtown Cincinnati. The Bartlett Building and the old Enquirer buildings are both stalled residential conversions, but otherwise, every large building is occupied.
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Old 02-06-2012, 10:06 PM
 
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I was in NYC in July. It has never been more bustling or prosperous. The wealth of manhattan today is truly startling. There is so much buying power there is just blew my mind. So many people with so much money. I could hardly remember the NYC of even the mid 90s with the creaking infrastructure and neglected parks. It isn't perfect, but it would be unrecongizable to someone who'd left in the middle 90s. The glamorous way that manhattan used to be portrayed in popular culture is the way it actually is today. What a transformation. It certainly wasn't done by cutting taxes.
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Old 02-06-2012, 10:56 PM
 
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^It was done, by large part, through culture. People want to move there to be part of the culture, and that culture was caused directly by its density, which was enabled by the subway system and extensive commuter rail. Companies tolerate the high taxes because there is no difficulty in attracting talent. Also, the high taxes are offset by having one of the world's premier international airports, which saves the time and reduces the need for private jets. There is also convenient rail service to the other east coast cities.

Good luck luring people from New York City to a company in Mason, Ohio, even if you double their pay. Part of the reason why 3CDC attacked city development problems so aggressively is because of P&G's purchase of Gillette. The story is told that P&G execs were stunned that hardly anyone moved from Boston to Cincinnati. They were expecting 2,000 and only got 300 or so (I don't know the actual numbers, but it was in the 1-in-5 to 1-in-10 range).
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Old 02-07-2012, 03:52 AM
 
5,314 posts, read 6,612,461 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Matthew Hall View Post
You suggested that the population of eastern hamilton county had reduced by 50%. let's see your evidence. If you don't have any, you can't say it. Of course, you have no idea and just WANT it to be true. I'm just calling you on it.

No I did not. I never said 50% moved.
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Old 02-07-2012, 03:54 AM
 
5,314 posts, read 6,612,461 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jmecklenborg View Post
Again, moving somewhere rural for low taxes is a fool's errand. Intelligent people recognize that there are serious drawbacks to moving to low tax areas, and don't move their residences or businesses there.

If the Tea Party was right, then every corporate headquarters would have moved out of Manhattan decades ago. Instead, New York City remains the center of world affairs, despite a city income tax that varies between 2.9% and 3.6% depending on income.

Many manufacturing facilities are in rural areas to get lower cost help.
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