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Old 02-07-2012, 06:04 PM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,360,925 times
Reputation: 1919

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joeytraveler View Post
Not that I want to reinforce Matthew's logic, self segregation is a pretty common thing. It's definitely something seen more heavily in newer immigrants communities but does still exist in cities with stronger ethnic ties.
What the Hell are you talking about? Are you saying people with a common background will congregate together, or what are you saying? I am just missing the point/
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Old 02-07-2012, 08:24 PM
 
307 posts, read 440,845 times
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Im saying there's a reason Omaha has a large Sudanese population, or why academics often live and socialize with other academics or why doctors aren't going to cocktail parties with iron workers. We are most comfortable with things similar to us. Be it origin, class, culture, income etc we all self segregate to a degree.
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Old 02-08-2012, 05:34 AM
 
2,886 posts, read 3,950,603 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joeytraveler View Post
Im saying there's a reason Omaha has a large Sudanese population, or why academics often live and socialize with other academics or why doctors aren't going to cocktail parties with iron workers. We are most comfortable with things similar to us. Be it origin, class, culture, income etc we all self segregate to a degree.
Yeah, and I'm kind of at a loss as to why anyone would consider that undesirable behavior, or think they have to make excuses that it's for economic reasons.

My own self-segregation as far as a place to live is that I want neighbors who take good care of their property, don't park junk cars in their front yards, don't have wild, noisy parties, don't let their dogs poop in my yard, etc. etc. etc. I don't care about their national origin, ethnicity, religion or educational level. I just want them to share my notions of what considerate, neighborly behavior is.
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Old 02-08-2012, 06:48 AM
 
307 posts, read 440,845 times
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I agree and don't feel that it is inherantly a bad thing. And while it's not as prevalent among traditional ethnic lines it's the reason gayborhoods and boys town exist.

In a political sense I read recently that we as a country are doing this more along political lines than ever before. I have a brother in law who has refused to look at certain neighborhoods while house shopping if he saw to many political signs of the opposing party.
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Old 02-08-2012, 07:05 AM
 
Location: Middletown, Ohio
1,727 posts, read 2,225,733 times
Reputation: 6382
Lightbulb Bravo Sarah...Well Said

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sarah Perry View Post
Yeah, and I'm kind of at a loss as to why anyone would consider that undesirable behavior, or think they have to make excuses that it's for economic reasons.

My own self-segregation as far as a place to live is that I want neighbors who take good care of their property, don't park junk cars in their front yards, don't have wild, noisy parties, don't let their dogs poop in my yard, etc. etc. etc. I don't care about their national origin, ethnicity, religion or educational level. I just want them to share my notions of what considerate, neighborly behavior is.
And I'll take it a step further (Catfish-style LOL)...

I honestly, straight-up, point blank don't give a shiznickle what political party you support, religion you practice, sexual orientation you choose, color of the ethnic rainbow you are, any of that furshlugginer nonsense...

As long as you and yours are good PEOPLE, and good NEIGHBORS, then I'll have your back 24-7-365...but like you Sarah, I don't want to be around people who act like they have no concept of home training and manners...keep your property up, carry on like you possess even rudimentary intelligence, and we'll be fine

Hell, I live in a predominately white, conservative-leaning neighborhood, and in going on 7 years, have never had a problem with my neighbors due to my ethnicity (black/Negro/colored/African-American, depending on the day of the week LOL) or my political leanings (LOL...Democrat [running for cover])...not ONCE...why? Because I strive to be the best neighbor and friend I can be to the folks in my 'hood...I keep my property tiptop, and keep an eye on my neighbors' homes when they're not around

And to end, I know life ain't one big campfire kum-ba-ya singalong, but I belieive in giving folk a fair shake as long as they carry on like they have some sense---whether they live next door to me or not
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Old 02-08-2012, 08:13 AM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,360,925 times
Reputation: 1919
Quote:
Originally Posted by captaincatfish View Post
And I'll take it a step further (Catfish-style LOL)...

I honestly, straight-up, point blank don't give a shiznickle what political party you support, religion you practice, sexual orientation you choose, color of the ethnic rainbow you are, any of that furshlugginer nonsense...

As long as you and yours are good PEOPLE, and good NEIGHBORS, then I'll have your back 24-7-365...but like you Sarah, I don't want to be around people who act like they have no concept of home training and manners...keep your property up, carry on like you possess even rudimentary intelligence, and we'll be fine

Hell, I live in a predominately white, conservative-leaning neighborhood, and in going on 7 years, have never had a problem with my neighbors due to my ethnicity (black/Negro/colored/African-American, depending on the day of the week LOL) or my political leanings (LOL...Democrat [running for cover])...not ONCE...why? Because I strive to be the best neighbor and friend I can be to the folks in my 'hood...I keep my property tiptop, and keep an eye on my neighbors' homes when they're not around

And to end, I know life ain't one big campfire kum-ba-ya singalong, but I belieive in giving folk a fair shake as long as they carry on like they have some sense---whether they live next door to me or not
You are successful in your neighborhood because of your attitude, basically treat others as you desire to be treated.

My wife and I have stayed in our house after 35 years and the kids all grown and gone for one basic reason - we like the neighborhood and feel comfortable here. We have several neighbors who apparently feel the same way, as they are also staying in their houses. We have all seen our kids grow up and move on. There is a degree of comfort associated with that.

Of course there is always some turnover. About 10 years ago the first A-A family moved into the neighborhood down the street from me. I know they have several kids and figured they wanted Mason for the schools. I will not try and say we are bosom buddies, the difference in age is significant.

But 10 years later they are still here. Obviously hard working and dedicated to family. Kind of keep to themselves, but I guess that is to be expected when you are surrounded by whities. My point is they made a decision to live here and as far as I can tell NO ONE has told them they do not belong. As you say, they are good neighbors and keep their property up very well. Besides that, the kids are apparently very good runners and have contributed greatly to the Mason cross country teams.
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Old 02-08-2012, 08:26 AM
 
Location: Middletown, Ohio
1,727 posts, read 2,225,733 times
Reputation: 6382
Lightbulb Thanks KJ

Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
You are successful in your neighborhood because of your attitude, basically treat others as you desire to be treated.

My wife and I have stayed in our house after 35 years and the kids all grown and gone for one basic reason - we like the neighborhood and feel comfortable here. We have several neighbors who apparently feel the same way, as they are also staying in their houses. We have all seen our kids grow up and move on. There is a degree of comfort associated with that.

Of course there is always some turnover. About 10 years ago the first A-A family moved into the neighborhood down the street from me. I know they have several kids and figured they wanted Mason for the schools. I will not try and say we are bosom buddies, the difference in age is significant.

But 10 years later they are still here. Obviously hard working and dedicated to family. Kind of keep to themselves, but I guess that is to be expected when you are surrounded by whities. My point is they made a decision to live here and as far as I can tell NO ONE has told them they do not belong. As you say, they are good neighbors and keep their property up very well. Besides that, the kids are apparently very good runners and have contributed greatly to the Mason cross country teams.
I have always liked your forthright style, even on the few occasions I haven't agreed with you...and hang the age difference---no one is so 'old' that they can't either teach or be taught

But I gotta say, with a big LOL and a smile, you made me laugh out loud when you said 'surrounded by whities'...KJ, you and your 'old' self could be my neighbor anytime
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Old 02-08-2012, 08:39 AM
 
2,886 posts, read 3,950,603 times
Reputation: 1499
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joeytraveler View Post
I agree and don't feel that it is inherantly a bad thing. And while it's not as prevalent among traditional ethnic lines it's the reason gayborhoods and boys town exist.

In a political sense I read recently that we as a country are doing this more along political lines than ever before. I have a brother in law who has refused to look at certain neighborhoods while house shopping if he saw to many political signs of the opposing party.
Yeah, I left sexual orientation and political affiliation off my list, but those are also in the category of stuff I don't care about.

Unfortunately, the demise of civility in our partisan political discourse seems to have infested every area of life, so I can understand your brother-in-law's reaction. I've noticed since moving back to Cincinnati that too few people seem to have had the same early training I did, that it's simply not considerate or courteous to discuss religion or politics in a social setting where you don't know the opinions or preferences of the people you're speaking with.

I've now lost track of the number of times I've been subjected to really unpleasant political rants on the part of people who simply assumed by the fact that I was present and happen to share some common interest and/or characteristics with them that I would agree lock, stock and barrel with their political opinions. Oftentimes even my attempts to shift the conversation onto another topic have been ignored. It's definitely enough to make you just want to avoid the people themselves altogether sometimes.
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Old 02-08-2012, 08:40 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati near
2,507 posts, read 3,351,758 times
Reputation: 5606
I would like to re-emphasize how much age and family situation affect the preference for urban/suburban living. When I was in my early 20s I was planning on getting an apartment in Mt. Adams when I got out of grad school, ditching my car, and relying on bicycle/motorcycle/bus for all my transportation, and pretty much living an urban lifestyle. When I finally was in an economic position to buy a house or rent an apartment based on what I wanted rather than what I could afford, I was in a very different phase of my life.

I decided that I wanted to be as close as possible to the most important people and places that I would be visiting( <15 minutes from my parents, her parents, my work, and commercial centers), I wanted a neighborhood that is safe for kids for when we start a family (not just crime, but limited vehicle traffic and good neighbors), and I wanted a mortgage that was small enough that we could be comfortable paying it on either my wife or my sole income if necessary. Putting these things together, we looked at roughly a dozen houses that satisfied this criteria. All of them were inside of I-275 and within five minutes from I-71, and all were within a mile or so of the Cincinnati City limits, on both sides of the line.

It is not hard to see how someone else with priorities similar to mine could end up living just about anywhere in Cincinnati, depending on their place of employment, family location, income, marital/familial status, etc. I am willing to bet that many of the people dismissing the suburbs are younger, childless, or otherwise lacking the perspective of those for whom the suburbs are a good fit, and are thus forming an opinion based on ignorance. Most people with perspective (for example my parents, living in the city of Cincinnati for 35 years with 5 kids) recognize the pros and cons of each. Similarly, people that exclusive categorize the city as a place that is too dangerous to even visit are also forming an opinion based on ignorance.

Finally, I am disturbed by the idea that a person is required to choose a side in the debate, vote with their feet, and stick to their position. Many of the people swear by urban living today will be in the suburbs at a later point in their life. Similarly, people like me who choose to live in an "inner ring suburb" now because it meets my needs can always choose to move into the city some time down the line if my requirements are met. I am not going to base my lifestyle on long term projections, and I am not going to let myself become so invested in my house that I cannot afford to move to a more suitable location if the need arises. Property value changes are important, but I do not think they are the argument winning trump card that some seem to think they are. In other words, even if I were to be given the written guarantee that my property value would increase by 5%/year if I bought a house in OTR/Hyde Park/Mason or any neighborhood in question, that would not be a convincing reason to make me want to live there.

I put taxes in the same category as property values. If your margin for error is so slim that your local tax bill affects your lifestyle to the extent that it is THE determining factor in choosing a place to live, it is probably a better idea to rethink your financial priorities. On the other hand, if you are choosing between two similar houses, the tax burden is definitely a convincing tiebreaker.
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Old 02-08-2012, 09:09 AM
 
307 posts, read 440,845 times
Reputation: 98
Good points chem_guy. If 1k a year is a make or break situation, then what do you do when the furnaces dies or roof needs replaced?
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