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Old 12-01-2011, 09:02 AM
 
307 posts, read 442,125 times
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Chem_guy,

It does seem to be a national trend of poverty increasing in suburban/exurban areas. While poverty is most often an urban problem it's more a societal issue. It could be argued that the services will follow there clients and not the other way around.
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Old 12-01-2011, 09:13 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati near
2,511 posts, read 3,366,086 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wilson513 View Post
We had a thread on Glencoe Place once too. there is some really incredible housing up on that hillside around Jacksion Park and Innwood Park.

But my candidate for the best renovated neighborhood in the US would be Pendleton. It is an island, and would be perfectly secure and self contained but for the current residents who fail to appreciate what they have. The Franciscans are to blame. Them and Model Realty (slum lord).
Pendleton has it all. Views, anchors (Pendleton Art Center, Verdin Bell, SCPA Building). Lovely mostly unmolested housing. The city should condemn the entire neighborhood, take it all by emminent domain and do a massive renewal. It would be jewel of the City and maybe of the country.
A year ago my cousin bought a beautiful old place in Pendleton for a stunningly low price. He has a garage that was formerly a carriage house that has a finished upstairs and an unfinished attic. He is entertaining offers to lease the upstairs garage space to some artists, and he is renting out the third floor of the house itself to some very attractive nurses at Christ hospital and their rent is significantly higher than his mortgage payment. Being a young single guy with very little expenses or responsibilities, he is going nuts with renovations. I fully expect that he could sell his place for triple the cost he paid for it within five years. With all of the money he is saving and equity he is building, he can almost afford to eat at Nicola's (which he can see out his back window) every night. I am happy for his good fortune, but it may have motivated his older brother and me to give him a few extra bruises last week in our annual family Thanksgiving tackle football game.
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Old 12-01-2011, 09:35 AM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,401,843 times
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At lot of this revolves around the old not in my backyard you don't syndrome. When the Linder Center of HOPE was announced for Mason, located on the old Ted Gregory farm property, there was a huge outcry at locating a mental health center there. Linder prevailed by keeping his name on the facility, basically telling everyone I am not ashamed of it and neither should you. Now that it is opened, I have not heard one beep of negative comment. It is a beautiful facility.

Rejuvenation of the downtown residential core is a needed objective. But if that involves displacing current low income residents, there needs to be a plan for where they are to go. Just pushing them out and saying go fend for yourself is not good enough. And that plan needs to involve not only housing, but employment and transportation for getting to and from.
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Old 12-01-2011, 09:53 AM
 
307 posts, read 442,125 times
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With all this talk of plans for displaced residents how do individuals see it happening? I feel like its more an organic occurrence. I know 3cdc says they haven't renovated a building in otr that had residences. If anything the deterioration over time has displaced more poor folks than anything. I guess I don't see why we need govt involvement in something that is happening for the most part organically. You could stay busy rehabbing abandoned buildings for quite some time in OtR before you'd have to worry about kicking people out.
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Old 12-03-2011, 10:29 AM
 
6,351 posts, read 18,921,015 times
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So I'm thinking: I'm "Economically Disadvantaged' since I can only afford to live in an upscale suburb of Dayton instead of in a gentrified OTR building or an estate in Indian Hill.
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Old 12-03-2011, 10:32 AM
 
6,351 posts, read 18,921,015 times
Reputation: 9895
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
At lot of this revolves around the old not in my backyard you don't syndrome. When the Linder Center of HOPE was announced for Mason, located on the old Ted Gregory farm property, there was a huge outcry at locating a mental health center there. Linder prevailed by keeping his name on the facility, basically telling everyone I am not ashamed of it and neither should you. Now that it is opened, I have not heard one beep of negative comment. It is a beautiful facility.

Rejuvenation of the downtown residential core is a needed objective. But if that involves displacing current low income residents, there needs to be a plan for where they are to go. Just pushing them out and saying go fend for yourself is not good enough. And that plan needs to involve not only housing, but employment and transportation for getting to and from.
If I think as a typical Conservative WLW listener, I'd say you're fulla baloney. But, as a thinking, compassionate person, I believe you're absolutely right.
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Old 12-03-2011, 01:19 PM
 
Location: Covington, KY
1,880 posts, read 2,129,186 times
Reputation: 595
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crew Chief View Post
So I'm thinking: I'm "Economically Disadvantaged' since I can only afford to live in an upscale suburb of Dayton instead of in a gentrified OTR building or an estate in Indian Hill.
As i said to Wilson513, a quarter of a million dollars for about two rooms next to a saloon. Remind me to relate my story of a former Centerville resident who moved into Dayton. That's where the "quaint" mentioned originated.
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Old 12-03-2011, 06:18 PM
 
465 posts, read 357,124 times
Reputation: 129
Wow, those who are heavily invested in suburbia aren't taking these changes well. I suppose I wouldn't either, if the shoe were on the other foot.
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Old 12-03-2011, 06:33 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati near
2,511 posts, read 3,366,086 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joeytraveler View Post
Chem_guy,

It does seem to be a national trend of poverty increasing in suburban/exurban areas. While poverty is most often an urban problem it's more a societal issue. It could be argued that the services will follow there clients and not the other way around.
I agree to some extent... exurbs are not really conducive to centralized services and bus routes, for example.
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Old 12-03-2011, 07:47 PM
 
Location: NKY's Campbell Co.
1,821 posts, read 3,900,143 times
Reputation: 853
Interesting thread. It makes me wish I had stuck it out in my Geography major instead of switching to something with a little more job security.

From what I know (which isn't much sadly), population migration is an inevitable circumstance of life in the United States. Development patterns allow for people to move where they want. It's free market capitalism.

I think you will see in most cities that are doing OK to well have this turnaround. It will be more prevalent in the northeast and Midwest than out west and in the south where there isn't as much "old" to redevelop. Smaller cities that don't have the population base to rehab inner cores (i.e. Dayton) won't see this change. It will hurt suburbs, especially inner ring ones, most because there isn't enough population to spread around. In other words, I think restorations analysis is pretty spot on in that with no new population to replace areas that are losing people to places like OTR, N. Avondale, etc and far out suburbs continuing but slower development someone has to lose. The losers here are inner ring suburbs. Of course, not all will have shifts in socioeconomic patterns, but some certainly will.

What will be interesting will be what direction development patterns will take when the economy really gets going again.
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