U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Ohio > Cincinnati
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-01-2011, 10:51 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
31,223 posts, read 57,377,537 times
Reputation: 52084

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
And yes I have been to Buffalo a whole lot of times
Wake up and smell the wing sauce! How can you claim to have been to Buffalo and not notice that it was and still is very much an industrial city? Steel mills, grain mills, railroad, shipping and shipbuilding ... It's quite a long list of industry that once was and still is in Buffalo.

I'd agree that Buffalo and Cleveland have much more in common than lake effect snow. Which really isn't as big of a deal in Cleveland as it is in Buffalo, anyway.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-01-2011, 11:01 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
7 posts, read 26,686 times
Reputation: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by I'minformed2 View Post
Indianapolis is also in Eastern Standard Time....

http://www.city-data.com/city/Indianapolis-Indiana.html
That's actually not true....city-data has to correct that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-01-2011, 11:05 AM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,374,610 times
Reputation: 1920
Quote:
Originally Posted by abr7rmj View Post
Kentucky is similar. While many people consider it a Southern state, is it really? It has far more in common with Ohio, Pennsylvania and Indiana than it does with Louisiana, South Carolina and Alabama.

As someone from southern Georgia if they think Kentucky is "southern"?
And what about Tennessee, do you not consider it a southern state? And how about West Virginia? Kentucky is every bit as much southern as either of these two. One of my daughters married a man from and lives in Kentucky. She now has more You Alls than you can count- sounds like Paula Dean.

The one thing I would agree with being a little out of whack with the traditional 12 midwest states are the 4 most western, North and South Dakota, Nebraska, and Kansas. To me they are definitely more western, not far west but western. And Oklahoma, which is considered south is definitely as much midwest as any of them.

Now Texas deserves its own designation. They believe it and by their attitude they deserve it. To me Texas deserves an asterisk next to its name, may be part of the US, may not.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-01-2011, 11:07 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
31,223 posts, read 57,377,537 times
Reputation: 52084
Nobody knows what time it is in Indiana. It's a fact.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-01-2011, 11:23 AM
 
2,492 posts, read 3,656,995 times
Reputation: 1385
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
And what about Tennessee, do you not consider it a southern state? And how about West Virginia? Kentucky is every bit as much southern as either of these two. One of my daughters married a man from and lives in Kentucky. She now has more You Alls than you can count- sounds like Paula Dean.

The one thing I would agree with being a little out of whack with the traditional 12 midwest states are the 4 most western, North and South Dakota, Nebraska, and Kansas. To me they are definitely more western, not far west but western. And Oklahoma, which is considered south is definitely as much midwest as any of them.

Now Texas deserves its own designation. They believe it and by their attitude they deserve it. To me Texas deserves an asterisk next to its name, may be part of the US, may not.
West Virginia is another strange one. Culturally, it shares a lot with the South (wink, wink) but geographically and most every other way it really doesn't. West Virginia joins Maryland and the DC area in the Mid-Atlantic region.

Sorry, when I think of "the South" and "Dixie," Wheeling (less than an hour from Pittsburgh) doesn't come to mind. Neither does Louisville or Lexington.

Valdosta, Mobile, Macon, Chattanooga, New Orleans, Jackson, Memphis, Atlanta - those places do come to mind.

And here's something that might really get your head spinning, kjbrill: I don't at all consider South Florida (Orlando and points south) to be "the South." That area is is more tropics than anything else, or at least East Coast vacationland. And Miami is borderline Caribbean or Latin America.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-01-2011, 11:29 AM
 
5,318 posts, read 6,620,829 times
Reputation: 2657
Quote:
Originally Posted by abr7rmj View Post
Why is Michigan the measuring stick? Ohio's footprint extends much further east than Michigan, and Michigan extends far further west than Ohio (and I'm not even taking into account the UP).

They share a border, yes. But Ohio also shares much longer border with Pennsylvania. And Ohio is less than 47 miles from New York state (just slightly longer than the distance from Florence to Middletown, which are both in the Cincinnati metro).

I've always felt it was a stretch to lump it with the gigantic footprint of the Midwest. If anything, it is a Great Lakes state or a state without a clear definition of what region it belongs too. But when people lump everything from Oklahoma and Kansas in with Ohio and Michigan as the "Midwest," it really stretches boundaries and credibility. Fargo, N.D., and Cleveland are simply not in the same region. But if you go by the standard "Midwest" definition they are. Absurd.

Kentucky is similar. While many people consider it a Southern state, is it really? It has far more in common with Ohio, Pennsylvania and Indiana than it does with Louisiana, South Carolina and Alabama.

As someone from southern Georgia if they think Kentucky is "southern"?

All of Ohio is not a Great Lakes region. There is nothing "Great Lakes" about Aberdeen, Rio Grande, Bethel, or any other southern Ohio city. The cities on Ohio's north coast have a different vibe than the southern Ohio cities.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-01-2011, 11:31 AM
 
5,318 posts, read 6,620,829 times
Reputation: 2657
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
Nobody knows what time it is in Indiana. It's a fact.

That's because they have "fast time" and "slow time".
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-01-2011, 11:42 AM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,374,610 times
Reputation: 1920
Sorry, I consider Lexington the south. They even consider Northern Kentucky a traitor region as they have thrown in with the Yankees across the river too much. The horse farm, southern gentleman aurora around Lexington is still very much in vogue, even if horse racing is a dying sport and the horse breeding has been transfered to Saudi Arabia.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-01-2011, 12:18 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
1,300 posts, read 2,646,060 times
Reputation: 1404
Quote:
Originally Posted by abr7rmj View Post
West Virginia is another strange one. Culturally, it shares a lot with the South (wink, wink) but geographically and most every other way it really doesn't. West Virginia joins Maryland and the DC area in the Mid-Atlantic region.
That is not correct. Whatever you think of WV and the South, WV has far far less in common with "Mid-Atlantic" than the South.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-01-2011, 12:18 PM
 
2,492 posts, read 3,656,995 times
Reputation: 1385
Quote:
Originally Posted by ram2 View Post
All of Ohio is not a Great Lakes region. There is nothing "Great Lakes" about Aberdeen, Rio Grande, Bethel, or any other southern Ohio city. The cities on Ohio's north coast have a different vibe than the southern Ohio cities.
And not all of Indiana, Pennsylvania, New York, Illonois or Minnesota are Great Lakes either, though they all touch a great lake. But I'm just going by the state as a whole. I would consider Ohio a Great Lakes state even though much of it is Ohio Valley. Similarly, I'd consider California a Pacific Coast state even though much of it is barren desert far removed from the ocean.

Last edited by abr7rmj; 12-01-2011 at 12:28 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Ohio > Cincinnati
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top