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Old 12-04-2011, 10:17 AM
 
Location: Cleveland Suburbs
2,554 posts, read 5,837,174 times
Reputation: 619

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Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
And what about Tennessee, do you not consider it a southern state? And how about West Virginia? Kentucky is every bit as much southern as either of these two. One of my daughters married a man from and lives in Kentucky. She now has more You Alls than you can count- sounds like Paula Dean.

The one thing I would agree with being a little out of whack with the traditional 12 midwest states are the 4 most western, North and South Dakota, Nebraska, and Kansas. To me they are definitely more western, not far west but western. And Oklahoma, which is considered south is definitely as much midwest as any of them.

Now Texas deserves its own designation. They believe it and by their attitude they deserve it. To me Texas deserves an asterisk next to its name, may be part of the US, may not.
I had to laugh at this. It's funny when you are driving on I-75 in Florence and you see the big tower with "Florence Y'all!". It's like they want you to know you have entered the South.
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Old 12-04-2011, 10:25 AM
 
Location: Cleveland Suburbs
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Cincinnati is built like an eastern city. The densely built downtown with the tight streets and density of the buildings with few surface lots in the CBD itself. Also, you have a lot of the rowhouses and brick built environment. The famous parking on the streets with any parking towards the back or center of buildings... very popular in OTR; the new Mercer Commons is very evident in this. The neighborhoods throughout Cincinnati feel very eastern to me.

Ohio is an interesting state. We are at the crossroads of eastern and midwestern. I really think Midwest is such a broad term, and there are a lot of subregions in it. There should be a Great Lakes region, and Ohio would fit that bill perfectly. In my opinion Ohio has nothing in common with Iowa and Nebraska. Ohio has a lot of defining characteristics of both the NE and Midwest, that is why we always have these discussions about what exactly Ohio is. They have it is the city vs city section too. Ohio always gets mentioned being too far east to be called Midwestern. It's a toss up, and I like it like that. Coming from Indiana which seems purely Midwestern, it's nice to have a state with some variety in it.
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Old 12-04-2011, 01:42 PM
 
Location: OH
361 posts, read 546,555 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Traveler87 View Post
Cincinnati is built like an eastern city. The densely built downtown with the tight streets and density of the buildings with few surface lots in the CBD itself. Also, you have a lot of the rowhouses and brick built environment. The famous parking on the streets with any parking towards the back or center of buildings... very popular in OTR; the new Mercer Commons is very evident in this. The neighborhoods throughout Cincinnati feel very eastern to me.

Ohio is an interesting state. We are at the crossroads of eastern and midwestern. I really think Midwest is such a broad term, and there are a lot of subregions in it. There should be a Great Lakes region, and Ohio would fit that bill perfectly. In my opinion Ohio has nothing in common with Iowa and Nebraska. Ohio has a lot of defining characteristics of both the NE and Midwest, that is why we always have these discussions about what exactly Ohio is. They have it is the city vs city section too. Ohio always gets mentioned being too far east to be called Midwestern. It's a toss up, and I like it like that. Coming from Indiana which seems purely Midwestern, it's nice to have a state with some variety in it.
I agree with this.

However, I don't agree with the statement in which you said Cleveland feels more eastern than Pittsburgh. If we're equating "eastern" with being "east coast", I find it difficult to comprehend that you can say Cleveland is more eastern that Pittsburgh.

I think people like to say Cleveland is "eastern" because of how similar to Buffalo it is. Buffalo doesn't feel very eastern/east coast to me at all. Cleveland and especially Buffalo have a lot of wood buildings, which is something you don't see a lot of in eastern cities. Cities on the east coast have a lot of structures made of brick.

Minus the rugged terrain of Pittsburgh, it feels a lot more east coast to me (similar to Cincinnati) than Cleveland or Buffalo. Pittsburgh has rowhomes similar to what you'll find in Philly with narrow streets literally like alleys. Additionally, the rowhomes in Pittsburgh are built right up to the sidewalk, abd the same with Cincinnati. Cleveland and Buffalo both have wide streets and a lot of detached single family homes; features that distinctly makes them feel "non-eastern" IMO.
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Old 12-04-2011, 11:06 PM
 
Location: Cleveland Suburbs
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wahl_Wrighter View Post
I agree with this.

However, I don't agree with the statement in which you said Cleveland feels more eastern than Pittsburgh. If we're equating "eastern" with being "east coast", I find it difficult to comprehend that you can say Cleveland is more eastern that Pittsburgh.

I think people like to say Cleveland is "eastern" because of how similar to Buffalo it is. Buffalo doesn't feel very eastern/east coast to me at all. Cleveland and especially Buffalo have a lot of wood buildings, which is something you don't see a lot of in eastern cities. Cities on the east coast have a lot of structures made of brick.

Minus the rugged terrain of Pittsburgh, it feels a lot more east coast to me (similar to Cincinnati) than Cleveland or Buffalo. Pittsburgh has rowhomes similar to what you'll find in Philly with narrow streets literally like alleys. Additionally, the rowhomes in Pittsburgh are built right up to the sidewalk, abd the same with Cincinnati. Cleveland and Buffalo both have wide streets and a lot of detached single family homes; features that distinctly makes them feel "non-eastern" IMO.
I should have been more specific due to the fact that I did mention Cincinnati's architecture. Cleveland feels more eastern than Pittsburgh culturally than in terms of architecture. The attitudes, way of life, and the institutions that have been set up here.
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Old 12-05-2011, 07:45 AM
 
Location: OH
361 posts, read 546,555 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Traveler87 View Post
I should have been more specific due to the fact that I did mention Cincinnati's architecture. Cleveland feels more eastern than Pittsburgh culturally than in terms of architecture. The attitudes, way of life, and the institutions that have been set up here.
Oh ok. Makes sense. Yeah, whenever I go to Cleveland, I notice once I'm around the people long enough, talking to them and getting a feel for the area, it feels significantly more east coast than Cincinnati. Pittsburgh looks east coast, but if you spend enough time there, it's easy to notice that it's not east coast culturally.

Although Cincinnati looks east coast, culturally speaking, it feels mostly southern, with a mix of midwestern flair. The accents of the natives is what definitely gives the area a more southern feel. A lot of Cincy natives claim they do not, but most have a noticable southern twang, with some having full blown southern accents.

Cornhole also makes the area feel southern, although I'm not sure if it's southern culturally or not. Its something I never heard of until I moved here. It's difficult to say exactly what Cincinnati is because there are quirks that you will find here and hardly anywhere else. Saying the word "please" for someone to repeat something is another example of a discovery I made upon moving here. Again, I don't know if that is a southern attribute or not, so its hard to say exactly what Cincinnati is culturally.
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Old 12-05-2011, 02:47 PM
 
5,807 posts, read 10,345,234 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wahl_Wrighter View Post
Oh ok. Makes sense. Yeah, whenever I go to Cleveland, I notice once I'm around the people long enough, talking to them and getting a feel for the area, it feels significantly more east coast than Cincinnati. Pittsburgh looks east coast, but if you spend enough time there, it's easy to notice that it's not east coast culturally.

Although Cincinnati looks east coast, culturally speaking, it feels mostly southern, with a mix of midwestern flair. The accents of the natives is what definitely gives the area a more southern feel. A lot of Cincy natives claim they do not, but most have a noticable southern twang, with some having full blown southern accents.

Cornhole also makes the area feel southern, although I'm not sure if it's southern culturally or not. Its something I never heard of until I moved here. It's difficult to say exactly what Cincinnati is because there are quirks that you will find here and hardly anywhere else. Saying the word "please" for someone to repeat something is another example of a discovery I made upon moving here. Again, I don't know if that is a southern attribute or not, so its hard to say exactly what Cincinnati is culturally.
The southern twang mostly applies to those with southern roots. People whos parents or grandparents did not come from the south, generally don't have that.
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Old 12-05-2011, 03:33 PM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,365,633 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tex?Il? View Post
The southern twang mostly applies to those with southern roots. People whos parents or grandparents did not come from the south, generally don't have that.
I feel you can definitely detect that. But my youngest daughter, who defected to the south, now definitely has the sourthern twang. If she keeps going on we may disown her.
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Old 12-05-2011, 03:42 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh PA
1,127 posts, read 1,889,154 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Traveler87 View Post
I should have been more specific due to the fact that I did mention Cincinnati's architecture. Cleveland feels more eastern than Pittsburgh culturally than in terms of architecture. The attitudes, way of life, and the institutions that have been set up here.
I'm not buying this, explain to me how the attitudes, way of life and institutions in Cleveland are : A. East Coast, and B. more east coast than Pittsburgh.
Cleveland would compare closely to cities in the region such as Buffalo, Detroit and to a certain extent Chicago more than it does Philly, NYC or Boston
Now back on topic, I am not too familiar with the city of Cincinnati, but at the airport most of the workers had a southern accent similar to one in WV (they may be from further south in KY though)
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Old 12-05-2011, 03:49 PM
 
Location: Cleveland Suburbs
2,554 posts, read 5,837,174 times
Reputation: 619
Quote:
Originally Posted by escilade18 View Post
I'm not buying this, explain to me how the attitudes, way of life and institutions in Cleveland are : A. East Coast, and B. more east coast than Pittsburgh.
Cleveland would compare closely to cities in the region such as Buffalo, Detroit and to a certain extent Chicago more than it does Philly, NYC or Boston
Now back on topic, I am not too familiar with the city of Cincinnati, but at the airport most of the workers had a southern accent similar to one in WV (they may be from further south in KY though)
Shocking a Pittsburgh forumer has something to say about Cleveland. Don't you talk about Cleveland enough in your own forum?

I'm not selling anything, so I don't care if you're buying it or not. I have lived in both cities, Cleveland feels more eastern in its culture and way of thinking.

Now, back on topic.... I don't detect a southern accent in Cincinnati at all unless they are from generations passed that are from Kentucky living in the Cincinnati area, and considering CVG is in Kentucky, that might explain the accent.
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Old 12-05-2011, 04:35 PM
 
Location: OH
361 posts, read 546,555 times
Reputation: 468
Quote:
Originally Posted by Traveler87 View Post
Shocking a Pittsburgh forumer has something to say about Cleveland. Don't you talk about Cleveland enough in your own forum?

I'm not selling anything, so I don't care if you're buying it or not. I have lived in both cities, Cleveland feels more eastern in its culture and way of thinking.

Now, back on topic.... I don't detect a southern accent in Cincinnati at all unless they are from generations passed that are from Kentucky living in the Cincinnati area, and considering CVG is in Kentucky, that might explain the accent.
I guess it's all relative and depends on where you're from, but it's fairly noticable to me. If you meet people from some of the outlying neighborhoods on both sides of the city: Sayler Park, Riverside, Price Hill, East End or California, it's definitely noticable. And some of the people I've talked to from the aforementioned neighborhoods are not migrants from KY. Many have been in Cincinnati for generations, yet there is a noticable twang in their accent.

Although Clermont County is not Cincinnati, it feels very southern IMO. It's also very conservative , and a very big supporter of the military. The tri-state in general has fairly strong ties to the military. It seems you hear of a local soldier dying or being injured from the war fairly often, and a majority of them appear to come from Clermont or Dearborn counties.

I guess my consensus is that Cincinnati is somewhat of a mix, but with a southern bent, while the metro area is certainly southern.
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