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Old 05-23-2012, 02:23 AM
 
Location: Covington, KY
1,896 posts, read 2,220,878 times
Reputation: 605

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To my way of thinking, the first things to consider are:

Decent water
Easy availability of a food supply

Reliable electricity
Reliable medium of communications

Convenient raw materials
Respectable medical services and education

Somehow some of the above is never in question in the inquiries.

I wonder why....

I say this as I think about communcations and Ludlow, Kentucky, reportedly saving it's post office while the main post office in Dayton, Ohio, is slated for closing (operations to be moved to Columbus).

(I always think about electricity.)
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Old 05-23-2012, 08:41 AM
 
5,713 posts, read 9,060,757 times
Reputation: 2455
You'll like this link then. Be prepared for electricity rates to skyrocket in OH and KY.

Electric rates going up in 2015 - chicagotribune.com
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Old 05-23-2012, 03:36 PM
 
Location: Covington, KY
1,896 posts, read 2,220,878 times
Reputation: 605
Quote:
Originally Posted by WILWRadio View Post
You'll like this link then. Be prepared for electricity rates to skyrocket in OH and KY.

Electric rates going up in 2015 - chicagotribune.com
Good grief that's complicated.

I'm prepared: first question for possible landlord: are utilities included?
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Old 05-23-2012, 03:57 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,966,516 times
Reputation: 925
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarpathianPeasant View Post
Good grief that's complicated.

I'm prepared: first question for possible landlord: are utilities included?
Their estimation is $10.83 extra per month.
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Old 05-23-2012, 07:25 PM
 
5,713 posts, read 9,060,757 times
Reputation: 2455
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomJones123 View Post
Their estimation is $10.83 extra per month.
They might be low balling that figure in order to avoid a panic. At best, there appears to be an 8 times increase in the price from this year ($16 per mwh) to over $130 per mwh in some states and then over $300 per mwh in Ohio. I just can't see how that will translate to a simple $10 a month increase for any customers.
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Old 05-24-2012, 06:32 AM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,816,524 times
Reputation: 1925
Much of this is tied to the strengthened government regulations for coal fired generating plants set to go into effect in 2015. It is similar to some of the rediculous MPG requirements which have been passed for cars in the future.

Coal is still one of our most abundant energy resources available here in this country. Yes coal contains sulfur and other nasty elements which when burnt pollute the air. But the coal-burning electric industry has done a great deal over the past several decades to reduce the amount of pollutants released. Most coal is now pulverized into a powder which is then injected into the burners to get a more complete combustion. Scrubbers have been installed to purge a large percentage of the pollutants from the exhaust, sort of like the catalytic convertor on your car.

But the environmental enthusiasts just keep upping the anty. Get another 5% of pollutants removed at 3 times the cost. So this entire scare about electricity costs is due to the anticipation many coal fired generating plants will simply be shut down, severely reducing capacity. What is the law of supply and demand, low supply plus high demand yields high price.

Oh a light bulb! Let the government take over all of these shuttered coal fired plants, pay to install the required pollutant control systems, and then sell them back to the utilities at 50 cents on the dollar. They can claim all of the jobs for the reconstruction, the jobs saved, etc. Call it the Electric Stimulus. Doesn't this have a bit of resemblance to what was done for the US Automotive Industry? Should be right up a politician's alley.

Someday, someone may propose a balance in all of this environmental BS. I would propose something like if shuttling this industry will inflict a more than 5% cost increase on its users it cannot be done. Come back when you have a better solution other than penalizing everyone.

Some of the liberal do-gooders, who themelves have never worked a day in their lives for an organization which actually supplies something we all need and consume on a daily basis, need to wake up and face economic facts.

BTW... Japan has recently shutdown their last nuclear generating facility. So for the first time in several decades they have no nuclear power electricity. Since Japan is a chain of volcanic mountains, they also have very limited resources in such as coal, or for that matter natural gas.

So where are they getting their electricity? Very likely by burning imported oil.
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Old 05-24-2012, 06:17 PM
 
Location: Green Township
329 posts, read 583,597 times
Reputation: 139
This is what I found weird about Cincinnati when I lived here, the electric company, Duke Energy, always spent unnecessary amounts of dollars on utility pole replacement, which is ridiculous here, you would be surprised how modern our utility system is, it is on par with Florida (has to replace many after hurricanes, etc) and Texas.
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Old 05-25-2012, 01:41 PM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
603 posts, read 802,202 times
Reputation: 564
Quote:
Originally Posted by WILWRadio View Post
You'll like this link then. Be prepared for electricity rates to skyrocket in OH and KY.

Electric rates going up in 2015 - chicagotribune.com
Yeah..... Not going to happen.

It's getting cheaper for utilities to throw up a few more natural gas generators since natural gas prices are in the toilet and likely to stay that way for a while. Coal plants are already shutting down. They can blame environmental regulations all day, and they will, but it's really because of all the natural gas that's flooded the market.

You can't have a natural gas boom like this without causing energy prices to drop.

It's eventually going to send coal prices down further as demand for coal drops, and it'll then be economical to upgrade those closed coal plants for cleaner emissions to take advantage of the cheaper coal.
If you really want cleaner coal plants, this is a good time to do it.
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Old 05-25-2012, 08:28 PM
 
5,713 posts, read 9,060,757 times
Reputation: 2455
Quote:
Originally Posted by stephen431 View Post
Yeah..... Not going to happen.

It's getting cheaper for utilities to throw up a few more natural gas generators since natural gas prices are in the toilet and likely to stay that way for a while. Coal plants are already shutting down. They can blame environmental regulations all day, and they will, but it's really because of all the natural gas that's flooded the market.

You can't have a natural gas boom like this without causing energy prices to drop.

It's eventually going to send coal prices down further as demand for coal drops, and it'll then be economical to upgrade those closed coal plants for cleaner emissions to take advantage of the cheaper coal.
If you really want cleaner coal plants, this is a good time to do it.
From what I understand they are not replacing the coal fired plants that are going offline with any new power plants. Not even Natural Gas fired plants.
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Old 05-25-2012, 09:19 PM
 
Location: IN
20,786 posts, read 35,828,356 times
Reputation: 13210
Electricity or demand growth in many areas of the US is flat or declining. The big utilities have figured out that ratepayers aren't going to like the idea of paying higher rates just so they can build more generation capacity. Energy efficiency and conservation have already cut into their profits so consumers have already taken most of the easy steps. Ohio for years has not been a good upstream neighbor in terms of pollution as the Northeast had to deal with the Midwest pollution plume for many years until many of the oldest coal plants received "modern" pollution control upgrades.
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