U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Ohio > Cincinnati
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 06-25-2012, 07:51 AM
 
203 posts, read 268,241 times
Reputation: 108

Advertisements

I came across this website that a research group produced. Im a geographer so I found it very interesting, and thought I would share with this Forum since there have been discussions on this topic in the past.

The group basically used data from the last three censuses to map how areas have changed in diversity over the last 20 years, and put it in a google mash up website for all to view. From the home page you can select Cincinnati, OH in the middle drop-down, and see the the metro area's map, and click through the 3 census data sets. The transition matrix on the right will show you the exact numbers for the region.

To simplify the results (census block counts), it looks like this:

.......................................1990....200 0....2010
White (low diversity).......... . 398......354..... 311
Black (low diversity).............. 34........33.......31
White (moderate diversity)..... 27....... 60....... 90
Black (moderate diversity)...... 18....... 30....... 43


I was most interested to see how the suburbs and exurbs change compared to over-the-rhine, and other downtown blocks. As expected the 'burbs are somewhat diversifying while several downtown blocks are whitening. But what else is interesting that almost all of the areas that where white majority w/ moderate diversity in 1990 have become black majority w/ moderate majority. Seemingly evidence of reverse white-flight, while black areas show evidence of diversifying (which could mean whites moving in, OR Latinos or Asians, one would need to look at the raw census data to determine that)

Anyway, have a look and let us know if this shows what you would expect, or if there is anything interesting that stands out.
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-25-2012, 08:11 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
3,335 posts, read 5,725,886 times
Reputation: 2058
great resource, thanks for sharing. i zoomed out a bit and looked at some of the statewide data and it seems pretty encouraging to me. in 1990, most everything was majority white except for city neighborhoods that were majority black. but if you go to 2000 and then 2010, you can see these concentrations dissipating. i think this speaks well for how we are moving towards a more integrated culture, even if it does take two decades for a noticeable change.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-25-2012, 02:55 PM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
603 posts, read 778,209 times
Reputation: 564
Quote:
Originally Posted by jasomm View Post
Anyway, have a look and let us know if this shows what you would expect, or if there is anything interesting that stands out.
There is one census block that appears fudged. The block around Paddock and Seymour. It went from White- Low Diversity in 1990, to White- Moderate Diversity in 2000, to Black- Low Diversity in 2010.

The census block appears to have no residential, it's just commercial property.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-25-2012, 09:43 PM
 
Location: Cambridge, MA
4,730 posts, read 10,929,204 times
Reputation: 6449
That immediate area is indeed strictly commercial now that the former Longview State Hospital is the long-gone state hospital. (Most of the property is now occupied by businesses, with the remaining "Warfield Center" along Summit Rd on the stretch that parallels the expressway.) The new Graeter's ice cream factory on Paddock is well situated for shipping product to eager connoisseurs around the world, what with the Fed Ex depot being right up the street. A large "college" of dubious academic repute occupies the SE corner of Paddock and Seymour. Where the human population thereabouts is concerned, I have my doubts that it's been anything but "Black/low-diversity" since the '70s east of I-75 for the most part. The notable exception is the "hidden gem" neighborhood bounded by Paddock and Towne St.
It was interesting - though far from surprising, since I've lived in it for 24 years - to see that the demographic shifts in the community where I live were notable enough to change the shading on the map. The end of the block-long street that I live on has remained "White/moderate diversity" while the other end transitioned from "Black/moderate diversity" to "high diversity." Gentrification's at work. Meanwhile, my native Wyoming seems to have more sections marked "moderate diversity" as time goes on. Again, no surprise since the paleface percentage has gone from about 87% to about 76%.
As soon as I opened that link I had a nerdgasm.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-27-2012, 07:15 AM
 
203 posts, read 268,241 times
Reputation: 108
I think the research group would be well advised to address blocks low populations (or population densities). Either by blanking-out blocks, or using distance-weighted interpolation to fill it in (they probably want to avoid a lot of blank blocks for visual reasons).

I've found lots of anomalies too, but I think you can trust the data from mostly residential blocks.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-27-2012, 09:56 AM
 
Location: Green Township
329 posts, read 564,032 times
Reputation: 139
Very interesting, the site. I was looking at my state and literally laughed because if you are on 1990 in Florida... All white people... 2010, Hispanic People all over the place, haha!
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-27-2012, 11:45 AM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
603 posts, read 778,209 times
Reputation: 564
Quote:
Originally Posted by jasomm View Post
I think the research group would be well advised to address blocks low populations (or population densities). Either by blanking-out blocks, or using distance-weighted interpolation to fill it in (they probably want to avoid a lot of blank blocks for visual reasons).

I've found lots of anomalies too, but I think you can trust the data from mostly residential blocks.
I didn't mean to derail the discussion. I just noticed it was the only block in the Cincinnati metro that went from White - Low Diversity to Black - Low Diversity from 1990 to 2010. I thought that would be an example of some recent "white flight", but it just turned out that census block didn't really have any homes in it. However, there were blocks around it that became less diverse over that same period of time.

I was happy to see my Paradise Valley neighborhood in North Phoenix was one of the 2-3 that changed from low diversity to moderate diversity from 1990 to 2000, and that has expanded to moderate diversity in about 7-8 census blocks in 2010. I know my particular cul-de-sac is probably high diversity.
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Ohio > Cincinnati
View detailed profiles of:
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top