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Unread 08-09-2012, 06:16 AM
 
Location: Long Island, NY
9 posts, read 4,494 times
Reputation: 15
Wink Help! I'm moving and confused after reading posts about mid- west cities

Hi everyone-
The info here is so helpful. I was up all night reading.
Anyway, I think I'm more confused than I was when I started.
I am looking to relocate from Long Island. I am limiting myself to the general mid- west area mostly because I do not want to go south ( hate the heat) and don't want to go too far west ( away from family).
I have felt like I don't " fit in" in NY since I have gotten older and changed my priorities and straightened my values ( I'm 38).
In a nutshell, it's too crowded, expensive, noisy, rude, elitist, and politically liberal.
I would ideally like to move to a city that is basically the opposite of NY. I am single and don't want to live in the suburbs- at least to start.
So, I guess this is the issue-
I am an attorney, however, I have always worked in government. I am also interested in politics and have very strong conservative views and values ( although I am obviously quite used to being completely surrounded by people who not only disagree with me but believe that I am somehow the only person with my beliefs who is not also a racist, homophobe, etc...sorry for digressing but you can tell why I'm currently in the wrong place).
The thing is that it seems that, all of the cities in the mid- west that we're initially recommended to me look to be quite liberal, both in the government, and demographically, with the suburbs providing all of the deep red.
( btw: the cities were Cincinnati, the twin cities, Indianapolis, and Milwaukee) I think maybe I should also consider Des Moines and possibly St. Louis.
I guess the best way to ask the question is- Do any, and if so which of these cities do you think offer at least a reasonable population of conservatives ( for social and professional opportunities).
Also, which cities would you say might be less attractive to people like my sister (no judgment- she is a hippie/ punk/occupy walk street type 20 something radical professional activist).
Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated.
I hope I was marginally coherent. I really was up all night reading all these discussions about the fact that all of the cities are actually liberal- I'm still traumatized.
I really don't think I can make it to Idaho or Utah....
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Unread 08-09-2012, 06:39 AM
 
3,674 posts, read 4,404,803 times
Reputation: 1314
Avoid St. Louis and Kansas City. Serious racial issues in both and both are very liberal politically and socially.

The Twin Cities is also very liberal however, the region is an economic powerhouse and has a well educated work force. You will likely find it easier to mesh culturally with the people in the Twin Cities than Kansas City which has more of a west coast culture (ala LA) developing. St. Louis possesses a more eastern metro area culture. Indy is a growing metro area and decidedly Midwestern in feel.

BTW. I'm originally from the Hartford area and I am familiar with these areas having lived in most of them. I'm also conservative with some libertarian influences. Personally I felt most welcome in the Twin Cities and even Indianapolis when I lived in both places. Least welcome by far in the Kansas City region. I have not lived in St. Louis though the few times I've spent the night there or dropped by for a bite to eat or to shop for something I have not felt unwelcome like I have in Kansas City.

Cincinnati is pretty conservative. I have always been made to feel welcome there. At present I am considering this area along with Pittsburgh for my next home. Some of the transplants and local people can offer more insight into the area than I. Pittsburgh is live and let live. Unlike Kansas City which seems quite polarized and possesses a herd mentality that makes people congregate along social and political lines, like New England, in the Pittsburgh area people will bypass someone's political affiliations and mingle with the other side. :-)
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Unread 08-09-2012, 07:01 AM
 
Location: "Daytonnati"
3,747 posts, read 1,992,663 times
Reputation: 2414
Indianapolis area would be your choice for midwest + conservative...particulary the suburban areas. Indiana is the most conservative state in the Midwest.

Nearby Cincy is Dayton, which, though a smaller metro area, is also quite conservative once you leave the city limits. Particularly the south and east suburban areas. The Dayton region is perhaps the most conservative place I've lived in.
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Unread 08-09-2012, 07:07 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,006 posts, read 1,953,695 times
Reputation: 870
Cincinnati is very conservative. I don't really know how to answer anything else for you w/o specefic questions. BTW - the mid west is hot and humid in the summer. Not like Florida but hot enough.
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Unread 08-09-2012, 07:58 AM
 
Location: Middletown
20 posts, read 10,924 times
Reputation: 29
I grew up in Syracuse, NY and have been living between Cincy and Dayton now for a year. I find it pretty conservative and like it that way.
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Unread 08-09-2012, 08:14 AM
Status: "Much Warmerr" (set 24 days ago)
 
Location: Mason, OH
7,335 posts, read 4,845,718 times
Reputation: 1477
For whatever reasons the cities themselves seem to becoming more and more liberal politically. Cincinnati is a good example with a majority of Democrats on the council. But once you get outside of the city, the greater metro area is about as Republican as you can get. Where I live in Warren Co many Republicans run unopposed, as it is just a waste of time, energy, and money for many Democrats.

So your desire to live in an urban environment which is conservative is frustrating.

Indianpolis may be your best bet, as it is a consolidated city/county government, which combined with the conservative nature of Indiana as a whole may offer the environment you are seeking.
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Unread 08-09-2012, 08:56 AM
 
3,674 posts, read 4,404,803 times
Reputation: 1314
A couple of things that Kesstrain needs to consider. If he is looking for a fine dining experience then Cincy has Indy beat. Indy is starting to develop more variety in its restaurant scene but it is still dominated by chains. Cincy OTOH has always had a great Mom and Pop dining experience with several nationally recognized restaurants. That would be the only real negative that I can see with Indy at this time.
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Unread 08-09-2012, 09:34 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,006 posts, read 1,953,695 times
Reputation: 870
Quote:
Originally Posted by WILWRadio View Post
If he is looking for a fine dining experience then Cincy has Indy beat. Indy is starting to develop more variety in its restaurant scene but it is still dominated by chains. Cincy OTOH has always had a great Mom and Pop dining experience with several nationally recognized restaurants.
Indy is more of a typical mid western city. IMO, mid west cities, such as Columbus and Indy are more automobile oriented and have a suburban vibe. Especially compared to east coast cities such as Baltimore and Philly.

Even though Cincinnati has it's share of suburban sprawl, it's a much more compact city with noticeably more foot traffic in the inner city neighborhoods. Most Cincinnati neighborhoods that are healthy have a walkable business district that have their fair share of small businesses. Cincinnati is very different from Indy and Columbus in this regard. Plus we are divided by hills and valleys, where most cities are a lot flatter in the mid-west.

This is in no way meant as a slight on Indy or C-bus. Just making note of obvious differences.
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Unread 08-09-2012, 10:05 AM
 
2,440 posts, read 1,683,637 times
Reputation: 1233
The conservative tag always slapped on Cincinnati is a bit of a misnomer, because the city itself is anything but. It's the heavily populated suburbs, and particularly the northern and eastern suburbs, that are notoriously conservative. The city itself is, thankfully, not. You'll find that Cincinnati City Council is almost entirely liberal, is very pro-rail transit, progress-oriented, environmentally aware and far, far more diverse than its peers. The city is home to one mega-large university and another smaller private one, gay neighborhoods, bohemian enclaves, strong arts and a growing liberal lean. Newcomers in their 20s and 30s predominantly work, play and increasingly live in the city. Obama carried Cincinnati and Cincinnati's Hamilton County in 2008 and we'll surely see a repeat of that this fall.

Cincinnati is anything but quintessential "Midwest." It's a city that really can't be pegged as being quintessentially anywhere; it has distinct influences of the three regions it sort of sits in the middle of - the Midwest, the Northeast and the South. Cincinnati has more in common with Pittsburgh and St. Louis than it does with any of its much closer in-state neighbors. Strangely, many Cincinnatians don't even view themselves as being from Ohio (or Kentucky for that matter) as they do with being from Cincinnati. Even the chamber bills the region as "Cincinnati, USA" rather than "Cincinnati, Ohio."

Last edited by abr7rmj; 08-09-2012 at 10:15 AM..
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Unread 08-09-2012, 10:18 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,006 posts, read 1,953,695 times
Reputation: 870
Quote:
Originally Posted by abr7rmj View Post
Even the chamber bills the region as "Cincinnati, USA" rather than "Cincinnati, Ohio."

Having lived in Dayton and northwest Ohio for a number of years and spending many a day trip in Columbus, I don't think Cincinnati is anything like other areas of Ohio. It is unique in it's own right.
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