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Old 08-13-2012, 08:51 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 2,592,157 times
Reputation: 913

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Wonder if downtown Cincy will see more kids as it improves. Philly is years ahead of Cincy is redeveloping it's downtown, Center City.

Best Places to Raise Kids: Raising Kids in the City | Philadelphia Magazine Articles
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Old 08-13-2012, 09:08 AM
 
Location: Covington, KY
1,200 posts, read 885,806 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TomJones123 View Post
Wonder if downtown Cincy will see more kids as it improves. Philly is years ahead of Cincy is redeveloping it's downtown, Center City.

Best Places to Raise Kids: Raising Kids in the City | Philadelphia Magazine Articles

WHERE you raise them doesn't matter. It's HOW you raise them. Much of life is much the same (or similar) for all. Simply put what's not in everyday experience needs to be taught. Suburban kids need to be taught about street people (etc.). City kids need to be taught that the milk on the table comes from cows (etc.). And, farm kids need to be taught about things like libraries and museums (etc.) as a part of everyday life.
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Old 08-13-2012, 09:14 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 2,592,157 times
Reputation: 913
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarpathianPeasant View Post
WHERE you raise them doesn't matter. It's HOW you raise them.
Well, good point.
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Old 08-13-2012, 09:35 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
3,193 posts, read 3,318,232 times
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This is a nice article that captures the thinking process a lot of city-minded families go through with regards to schools. It is a little scary jumping into the public school system of a city. Things are different and a bit confusing. But to expand on what CarpathianPeasant points out, I think that if you are worrying about where your kids go to school and comparing and contrasting every possible option, that this alone is more important than the school building and shows you of parent that will raise excellent children, regardless of the ultimate choice of educational institution.
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Old 08-13-2012, 09:50 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 2,592,157 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by progmac View Post
It is a little scary jumping into the public school system of a city.
I experienced this in Cincinnati. Being familiar with all of the well founded horror stories that some have experienced in CPS. It took a lot of work and patience to get my son into SCPA. Also a lot of calls to administrators when things weren't going well. In the end we were successful, but you have to be aggressive with so much competition. At times I seriously considered private schools. As we navigated CPS we learned of a lot of excellent neighborhood schools smattered throughout the city that took kids from other neighborhoods. So there are viable options for parents who care to do the work and dig up the best CPS has to offer.

It would have been easier to move to the suburbs that had highly rated districts. But then we would sacrifice so very much of what we enjoy as a family. My son was at Washington Park last night. 5 minutes there and hours of fun. He really dug the side walk fountains. I can't see driving 45 minutes for what can be experienced where I live.
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Old 08-13-2012, 09:58 AM
 
Location: Far from where I'd like to be
25,453 posts, read 31,957,858 times
Reputation: 37312
Love the inference that all suburban families spend their weekends tending to the lawn or hours stuck in traffic jams each day. Idiotic statements like these compel me to dismiss the entire article, no matter how valid the rest of it may be.

The author brings up Penn Alexander School, where "home prices have skyrocketed" -- which of course means the working class and the underclass have been or will be pushed out. How is this progress? Improve the schools across the board, and people with kids (and with money -- seemingly the important factor) won't leave the city.
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Old 08-13-2012, 10:00 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 2,592,157 times
Reputation: 913
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
Love the inference that all suburban families spend their weekends tending to the lawn or hours stuck in traffic jams each day.
Relax. They also did an article aimed at suburban readers.

Best Places to Raise Kids: The 15 Most Family-Friendly Philly Suburbs | Philadelphia Magazine Articles

If we could for once endeavor not to turn this into some suburb/urban match up I think it would be a good thing. If either of the two supposed camps has to draw negative comparisons to give compelling evidence for superiority over the other then something is sorely amiss. Notwithstanding the obvious slight in the article, it gives good insight - IMO anyway.
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Old 08-13-2012, 11:33 AM
Status: "Winter's Here" (set 3 days ago)
 
Location: Mason, OH
8,710 posts, read 6,892,133 times
Reputation: 1723
Tom...

I agree the suburb against the urban thing gets rather old, and some of the arguments from both camps are contrived. I am not about to say you are crazy for where you live, and I would like the same consideration in return.

But some comments concerning commute times, etc. are just not true. Hours stuck in traffic jams is just not the norm for Cincinnati. I have a daughter who lives with me and works in Hebron Ky near the airport. That is a distance of 40 miles. She takes I-71 from Mason downtown and then I-75/I-71 out to I-275 and to Hebron. She leaves Mason habitually about 7:15 AM to be in Hebron at 8:00 AM so it is not like she is avoiding Rush hour. Sure there are exceptions, usually weather related, but no different than when the Metro bus doesn't show up on schedule. Do I agree this commute is costing her a lot for gas, yes it is. But it is her decision how she wants to spend her money.

Comments like suburbanites spending all their time on weekends tending to their manicured and overwatered lawns. It takes me about 2-1/2 hours to mow my 1 acre lot with a small riding mower. True, I can look around and count a half-dozen lawn/garden/nursery/landscaping places within easy driving distance. But these are businesses also. They are providing jobs for quite a number of people in this area. I do not try and manicure every blade of grass, as my philosophy is a hard frost will kill the weeds, the only survivors in a drought, and we will start over next year and find out what Mother Nature brings us in the way of rain.

This week begins the W&S Open at the Lindner Family Tennis Center in Mason. This is one of only 9 tournaments which make up the ATP World Tour Masters 1000 series. It is the 2nd highest ranked tennis tournament in the country next to the US Open in NYC. And BTW it is within easy walking distance of my house. Did I win one on that? BTW we still owe a debt of gratitude to Carl Lindener III for all of the contributions he made to Cincinnati.

I used to put in a 110' x 50' vegetable garden on my lot, larger than many city lots. I guess the fact I like to garden makes me an overconsuming suburbanite.

I am not tying to start an argument with these comments. I am simply stating there are many reasons for both urban and suburban supporters to like where they live. We simply are not going to agree on all of the details.
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Old 08-13-2012, 11:40 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 2,592,157 times
Reputation: 913
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
I am not tying to start an argument with these comments. I am simply stating there are many reasons for both urban and suburban supporters to like where they live. We simply are not going to agree on all of the details.
It's interesting that a few comments in the article that I didn't even notice has caused you and Ohiogirl81 to be offended at the expense at the rest of the article.

First, for traffic, the article is from Philadelphia where there are many more people and much more traffic. North east cities are notorious for their commute times. I have reverse commuted (by train) from NYC to Westchester County, and places in Connecticut such as Greenwich, Stamford, and Hartford - it was normal for these places to take an hour and a half to two hours (one way) to reach. I can only imagine what people who work in the city and commute from those places experience daily.

It's a three page article that offers a lot of insight into changing trends in our major cities, written in Philadelphia where this trend has seemingly matured. I think Cincinnati is experiencing similar changes as well.

So, please step back from whatever is ruffling your feathers and check out the article in spite of the irritants. BTW - I deal with similar stereotypes in articles that are slanted towards suburban readers.
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Old 08-13-2012, 01:39 PM
 
Location: Far from where I'd like to be
25,453 posts, read 31,957,858 times
Reputation: 37312
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomJones123 View Post
Notwithstanding the obvious slight in the article, it gives good insight - IMO anyway.
Point taken.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TomJones123 View Post
It's a three page article that offers a lot of insight into changing trends in our major cities, written in Philadelphia where this trend has seemingly matured. I think Cincinnati is experiencing similar changes as well.
OK, so the suburban thing was just a knee-jerk reaction. Apologies. What really got to me was the glowing descriptions of the author's daughter's school (if it's either of the two I'm thinking of, both are practically impossible to get into, especially the school that has its attached elementary school) and how wonderful life is in the city for this teenager.

Swell. I'm really happy for her.

What about the other kids, the ones who have been shoved out of formerly affordable and now-trendy neighborhoods, the ones who can't or don't or their parents won't help them get into the high-performing magnet schools, or the ones who don't qualify for scholarships to private schools? What about the kids who'd gladly sit on the bus for three hours to get to their preferred school, but can't get in? Or the kids who don't want to sit on the bus for three hours, but would rather go to a neighborhood school?

That's why I made the comment about improving the school system overall. There's a lot of work to be done by CPS, and until the school district makes significant progress in all of its neighborhood schools, not just the magnet schools with great test scores or the schools in more affluent neighborhoods, to the point where Oyler Elementary is just as good as Kilgour Elementary, the city schools vs. suburban schools will always be an issue for residents.

Or are we more interested in attracting bright, educated adults (with money) to the city, and more interested in educating their bright, college-bound offspring?
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