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Old 10-14-2012, 01:24 AM
 
Location: OH
688 posts, read 864,481 times
Reputation: 364

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Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
Impact fees are usually a one time thing placed on a property either when the house is built or on the development as streets are constructed and lots platted. They are intended to offset such things as sewer and water plant expansions, infrastructure items. Developers complain they must add these fees onto the price of the property.
These sound like a great idea to me. I wish Miami Twp had employed such fees when the Miami Trails subdivision was being constructed. For those of you not familiar with this labyrinth, Miami Trails is a development started in 1989 which comprises over 300 homes in the Trails section. Development continued in the mid-1990s (and may even be continuing today for all I know) to eventually spawn over 1,000 homes in Miami Woods, Miami Estates, and Miami Sanctuary that all connect to each other. Sadly, the infrastructure around this development was woefully insufficient to sustain such population growth and traffic backups at Wards Corner and Branch Hill Guinea Pike were painfully congested at all times. Additional subdivisions around this area such as Belle Meade and The Oasis resulted in regular stand-stills at Loveland-Miamiville Rd and Price Rd as well as on Paxton Rd and Rt 48 among manifold other congestion spots.

I long argued amongst my friends that a fee should have been levied upon the sale of those homes which would fill dedicated coffers to improve street widening and installing traffic signals. At the time I was much too young and clueless how to initiate action with local government. It was not until 25 years after the first few homes were built in Miami Trails that Miami Twp finally widened many of these intersections to install turn lanes along with traffic lights to replace stop signs. Traffic can still become considerably congested and this once rural township is not the epitome of suburban sprawl.
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Old 10-14-2012, 09:10 PM
 
Location: In a happy place
3,707 posts, read 6,575,440 times
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I did a little more research and found that the area I was speaking of had the fees overturned by the Ohio Supreme Court as being unconstitutional.
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Old 10-14-2012, 09:17 PM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,377,243 times
Reputation: 1920
[quote=rrtechno;26511707]I did a little more research and found that the area I was speaking of had the fees overturned by the Ohio Supreme Court as being unconstitutional.[/quote

Doesn't surprise me. The courts seem to favor the home owner in about everything. Maybe we need to vote all of the judges out of office, since they obviously make too much money to be concerned about the common man.
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Old 10-17-2012, 12:17 AM
 
Location: OH
688 posts, read 864,481 times
Reputation: 364
[quote=kjbrill;26511776]
Quote:
Originally Posted by rrtechno View Post
I did a little more research and found that the area I was speaking of had the fees overturned by the Ohio Supreme Court as being unconstitutional.[/quote

Doesn't surprise me. The courts seem to favor the home owner in about everything. Maybe we need to vote all of the judges out of office, since they obviously make too much money to be concerned about the common man.
Eh, not sure I agree with that statement. There was a pretty big argument made regarding emminent domain in the Norwood / Rookwood Mall area that I believe made it all the way to the national level of media coverage. If I remember correctly a homeowner or two got the shaft with respect to property valuation and compensation (though I could be wrong as I only followed the story casually).

I've also read a couple high profile cases lately that make me question if the Feds respect our privacy rights. I can recall three or four cases where police or drug enforcement agents barged into homes in the middle of the night in full tactical gear and when frightened homeowners reacted they wound up dead with no recourse for the family. Add to it we now have local police departments using infrared thermal imaging and military drone technology in domestic skies and it hardly seems like homeowners are the beneficiary of judicial rule anymore.
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Old 10-17-2012, 07:11 AM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,377,243 times
Reputation: 1920
[quote=Zen_master;26544317]
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post

Eh, not sure I agree with that statement. There was a pretty big argument made regarding emminent domain in the Norwood / Rookwood Mall area that I believe made it all the way to the national level of media coverage. If I remember correctly a homeowner or two got the shaft with respect to property valuation and compensation (though I could be wrong as I only followed the story casually).
I think you are slightly off there. The few homeowners who held out were actually granted the right by the courts to refuse the eminent domain offer. The majority accepted their offers and sold. The few who held out felt they had the developer over a barrel and their offers would have to be increased. For a long time the rest of the property had been leveled and was just a sea of rubble waiting further development. Those few houses just stood there like beacons to greed.

Many years ago my former employer in Norwood wanted to increase their parking lot. They made offers to purchase several properties along Edwards Rd for the expansion. The majority of the owners agreed to sell and relocate. One property owner refused to sell, wanting considerable more money. Before they knew it the other houses were torn down and repaved as a parking lot and they had a nice big fence around their standalone house. What do you think its value was then?
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Old 10-17-2012, 08:22 AM
 
2,886 posts, read 3,956,094 times
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The problem with the Rookwood thing from the beginning was the city's designation of the neighborhood as " blighted." Anyone who saw it would immediately realize that was ridiculous. I saw the amounts the homeowners were offered for their properties, and they were extremely generous, assuming you only compared it to what they could have sold for had the development not been attempted.

I don't believe greed was what motivated the holdouts. No one in their right mind would endure the years of legal wrangling those people did just for a little more money. IMO they are American heros who literally helped re-establish the principle of individual property rights all over the country. Because the case really was that momentous.
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Old 10-17-2012, 12:46 PM
 
3,751 posts, read 10,219,757 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dadof2divas View Post
I called Warren county this week and they told me the house is worth $215K and taxes will be $4150 this upcoming year!!! OUCH. Lebanon is on our search as well since Little Miami has such steep taxes. I am looking forward though to paying $45 for my tags though instead of $180 that we have paid else where!
You won't find considerably cheaper taxes in Lebanon. While I feel our school district funding is fair, a big levy passed in 2011 which was on this year's taxes - my taxes increased several hundred dollars.

Additionally, in Lebanon city - there is an income tax you will have to pay (although if you're working there you may have to pay it anyway so that could be a wash for you). I live in warren county in turtle creek twp., but with Lebanon schools - so I'm pretty familiar with taxes up there.

Property taxes fund a lot in Ohio, so its unlikely you're going to find any place where they're terribly low.

Good luck on the house hunting!!
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Old 10-17-2012, 05:58 PM
 
189 posts, read 386,525 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Briolat21 View Post
You won't find considerably cheaper taxes in Lebanon. While I feel our school district funding is fair, a big levy passed in 2011 which was on this year's taxes - my taxes increased several hundred dollars.

Additionally, in Lebanon city - there is an income tax you will have to pay (although if you're working there you may have to pay it anyway so that could be a wash for you). I live in warren county in turtle creek twp., but with Lebanon schools - so I'm pretty familiar with taxes up there.

Property taxes fund a lot in Ohio, so its unlikely you're going to find any place where they're terribly low.

Good luck on the house hunting!!

Thanks for the input. I will be working in Lebanon City so hopefully the taxes wash. I have also noticed that Lebanon has changed certain areas of flood plains as well. Do you happen to know anything about this? Also the taxes taht are in place now are still lower then places like Little Miami and Mason schools!! Little Miami are just high and with working in Lebanon I would like to stay close to home to save on commute time. How is the shopping in Lebanon area? I know a Khols is in South Lebanon anything new proposed in the Lebanon area?
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Old 10-17-2012, 06:39 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
31,223 posts, read 57,377,537 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sarah Perry View Post
The problem with the Rookwood thing from the beginning was the city's designation of the neighborhood as " blighted." Anyone who saw it would immediately realize that was ridiculous.

[snip]

I don't believe greed was what motivated the holdouts. No one in their right mind would endure the years of legal wrangling those people did just for a little more money. IMO they are American heros who literally helped re-establish the principle of individual property rights all over the country. Because the case really was that momentous.
Agreed on both points. Norwood designated the homes as "blighted" because they had one bathroom, because some streets had no outlets, because it was cut off from the rest of Norwood by the freeway, etc. Insert outrageous reason here. What that neighborhood actually was was a well-established, stable group of attractive, well-kept, decent, working-class homes. Those holdouts are heroes. Every home owner should make him/herself well acquainted with that case.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dadof2divas View Post
Thanks for the input. I will be working in Lebanon City so hopefully the taxes wash. I have also noticed that Lebanon has changed certain areas of flood plains as well. Do you happen to know anything about this? Also the taxes taht are in place now are still lower then places like Little Miami and Mason schools!! Little Miami are just high and with working in Lebanon I would like to stay close to home to save on commute time. How is the shopping in Lebanon area? I know a Khols is in South Lebanon anything new proposed in the Lebanon area?
Lebanon is just a hop, skip and a jump from shopping in Dayton's south suburbs and Cincinnati's north suburbs. Any perceived lack of places to shop hasn't stopped anyone from moving there.

If you live in Lebanon and work in Lebanon, you'll be paying a 1 percent income tax, and whatever property taxes on your home. If you decide not to live in Lebanon, you still pay 1 percent to the city of Lebanon via your payroll taxes; what income taxes you'll owe your home jurisdiction will depend on that jurisdiction. Townships in Ohio cannot levy income taxes; however, some school districts do. Some villages and cities will reciprocate income taxes; some won't.
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Old 10-18-2012, 07:44 AM
 
3,751 posts, read 10,219,757 times
Reputation: 6560
Quote:
Originally Posted by dadof2divas View Post
Thanks for the input. I will be working in Lebanon City so hopefully the taxes wash. I have also noticed that Lebanon has changed certain areas of flood plains as well. Do you happen to know anything about this? Also the taxes taht are in place now are still lower then places like Little Miami and Mason schools!! Little Miami are just high and with working in Lebanon I would like to stay close to home to save on commute time. How is the shopping in Lebanon area? I know a Khols is in South Lebanon anything new proposed in the Lebanon area?

I did know that Mason had relatively high taxes. As a percentage, I'm not sure - but housing values are higher there (on average, I believe) - so wasn't sure if the higher taxes were due more to that.

Shopping in Lebanon is okay. I guess it depends on what you mean? There's a lovely Kroger Marketplace in town for all of your groceries (and even paper products/ pharmacy) if you shop often. There's also a Walmart and a Home Depot. In South Lebanon (about 5 miles down Rt 48) there's a Kohl's, Lowe's, and Target.

You are approx. 15 minutes from Deerfield Township and the crazy traffic (at rush hour!) that is the Field's Ertl/Mason Montgomery Exchange (JC Penny, Costco, Car Dealerships, Random Boutique-y stores). You are about 20 minutes (not in rush hour) from Kenwood Town Center. Also 20 minutes (approx) from the Middletown exchange on I-75 (Lowes, Walmart, Target, Kohl's, Towne Center Mall which is getting a redevelopment apparently). Perhaps 20-25 minutes from the Dayton Mall (S. Dayton/Miami's burg basically).

Restaurants are limited in Lebanon proper, but you won't starve. However we could definitely use more sit-down type joints.

Lebanon has a lot of little festivals (as does Waynesville, about 10-15 minutes away). The big one for Lebanon coming up, is the carriage/horse parade -- on the first Saturday of December. It draws a very large crowd.

Downtown Lebanon mostly has a lot of little stores for the tourists, not the town folk (antique and boutique-y decor type stores). Though a little more practical stuff is taking hold (there's a fitness place that's great, a couple of nice hair salons, a branch of a Dayton cupcake shop, a fancy new gun shop, and a new sandwich/lunch joint.).

Anyway - schools are reportedly good (we don't have kids). There's a huge fancy YMCA that most people with families seem to like (a lot of youth offerings), and a lot of things to do in the area if you want.. (bike trail, Ft. Ancient, some camp thing (Camp Kern) with a zipline, kayaking in the little miami, orchards/fall festivals, car show/blues show in the summer, historic Lebanon and the Glendower manor, etc...

I'm not a huge Lebanon booster (its actually a bit to rural for us, but live and learn), but I would imagine there are far worse places to live.... especially if you're actually working there.

good luck with your decisions - I pop on every couple of days if you have any other questions
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