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Old 10-22-2012, 12:12 PM
 
2,886 posts, read 3,965,971 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
I think what Sarah's saying is that Cincinnati has to pay attention to all its neighborhoods, not just downtown, Over-the-Rhine, and a few other places. Correct me if I'm wrong, please, Sarah.

I'd agree, if the city is indeed cutting its support of the community councils, that it's a huge mistake.
Thanks. That's exactly what I was saying. And the city already cut off most of the funding to the community councils. Mine no longer has the money to even mail a quarterly newsletter.
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Old 10-22-2012, 12:14 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by progmac View Post
It depends what one means by "pay attention to." There simply isn't the money to promote development in all the neighborhoods. It would waste what relatively little money there is.
I agree. But IMO the city needs to pay attention to basic services and quality of life issues involving what's already there.
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Old 10-22-2012, 12:16 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,841,599 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by progmac View Post
It depends what one means by "pay attention to." There simply isn't the money to promote development in all the neighborhoods. It would waste what relatively little money there is.
I think some of the misunderstanding around Cincinnati comes with what is happening downtown, which as has been noted is a top down approach by the corporations headquartered there and support from the city. An organic approach carried out by investors and private citizens stands in stark contrast. An example of this in Cincinnati is Prospect Hill. Some of the neighborhoods will have to fend for themselves. It's simply not the city's job to be in the development and real estate market. Though they sure seem to try -- and fail where there is not major money flowing in from outside sources.

Now, the city of Cincinnati may seem to get the credit for what's happened in downtown and OTR, but they are hardly the catalyst. 3CDC is.
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Old 10-22-2012, 12:18 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,841,599 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sarah Perry View Post
But IMO the city needs to pay attention to basic services and quality of life issues involving what's already there.
We are on the same page here for sure. I am not a supporter of all the political BS that goes on around here, not in the least. But it's hardly unique to Cincinnati.
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Old 10-22-2012, 12:26 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
3,335 posts, read 5,746,317 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sarah Perry View Post
I agree. But IMO the city needs to pay attention to basic services and quality of life issues involving what's already there.
Roads and police?
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Old 10-22-2012, 01:19 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,841,599 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohioan58 View Post
I think I was putting undue emphasis on the age factors.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohioan58 View Post
My mother was a born and bred Daytonian and when we'd take a drive through some nearby town like Spring Valley she'd remark that it seemed extremely sterile, lacking people, and boring. So there's an example of an elderly small city person who doesn't want anything to do with rural life.
I've seen it go both ways. I've known people who got older and left NYC for Florida. And I've known older people who would never leave NYC. So, I guess it's the same no matter where you live. If you like it you will find reasons to stay.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohioan58 View Post
I do think it's true that it requires more energy to live in a big city. You walk more, and you strategize more about getting from point A to point B. It's a more demanding environment in some ways.

One definition of life itself is movement. You have to exert more personal energy living in a city. Suburbs are kind of dead in some metaphoric and quite real non-metaphoric ways.
It's interesting. One could make the point for a better quality of life in either place depending on having the resources to deal with issues that come up later in life. A person could be dead broke, living in the suburbs and have little to no family or resources to deal with life. The same could happen in a big city. One could make the case for a more active lifestyle leading to better longevity. Though the same argument could apply to driving your Suburban to the golf course, and other activities.

My point is the same. It's all a matter of what one likes. Although, I have learned a broader perspective in this thread. Younger folks are trending towards the cities. That has to do with a lot of reasons, but the least common denominator is they are choosing their lifestyle, and for many it's in stark contrast to their parent's way of life.
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Old 10-22-2012, 09:16 PM
 
800 posts, read 700,139 times
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>I agree. But IMO the city needs to pay attention to basic services and quality of life issues involving what's already there. Roads and police?

Yet another City-Data conversation where people rat on a city when they don't even know what cities can do under Ohio law. THE THREE MAIN TASKS A CITY PERFORMS IN OHIO IS POLICE, FIRE, AND ROADS. THESE ITEMS CONSUME 90% OF EVERY OHIO CITY'S BUDGET. So when these Republican talk show hosts and politicians say the city should get back to "basic services", they are fooling you. As a percentage often less than 10% of an Ohio city's budget pays for anything else.
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Old 10-23-2012, 11:42 AM
 
Location: Beavercreek, OH
2,194 posts, read 3,025,093 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jmecklenborg View Post
Yet another City-Data conversation where people rat on a city when they don't even know what cities can do under Ohio law. THE THREE MAIN TASKS A CITY PERFORMS IN OHIO IS POLICE, FIRE, AND ROADS. THESE ITEMS CONSUME 90% OF EVERY OHIO CITY'S BUDGET. So when these Republican talk show hosts and politicians say the city should get back to "basic services", they are fooling you. As a percentage often less than 10% of an Ohio city's budget pays for anything else.
Hi jmecklenborg--

Source?



Let me try one: the Hamilton County Auditor's Office.
http://www.hcauditor.org/pdf/re_ratetaxpaid_2012.pdf

Looks like schools consume about 70% of the money.

Granted, this is property taxes only and not income taxes as well. But stop kidding yourself when you claim that police, fire, and roads are 90% of the budget.

You're entitled to your own opinion, but not your own facts.
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Old 10-23-2012, 12:00 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,841,599 times
Reputation: 924
Can we for once have a thread w/o the same old city/county - right/left arguments? Last I checked it was City Data. Not complain about local governments data. Start a new thread for it, or take it to a political forum. This one has it's own topic.
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Old 10-23-2012, 12:01 PM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
4,786 posts, read 7,369,549 times
Reputation: 4320
Quote:
Originally Posted by hensleya1 View Post
Hi jmecklenborg--

Source?



Let me try one: the Hamilton County Auditor's Office.
http://www.hcauditor.org/pdf/re_ratetaxpaid_2012.pdf

Looks like schools consume about 70% of the money.

Granted, this is property taxes only and not income taxes as well. But stop kidding yourself when you claim that police, fire, and roads are 90% of the budget.

You're entitled to your own opinion, but not your own facts.
You're mistaken. Schools aren't a part of a city's budget, at least not in Ohio. Counties collect property taxes, and distribute them to the various entities they are collected for. That's why you pay one property tax bill. School districts are separate from municipalities. (whether city, village, or township)
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