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Old 11-24-2012, 03:04 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,830,579 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hensleya1 View Post
Just steer clear ..... Over-the-Rhine north of Liberty street
That would mean steering clear of Findlay Market. Not a good recommendation.
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Old 11-24-2012, 03:09 PM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,369,950 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TomJones123 View Post
That would mean steering clear of Findlay Market. Not a good recommendation.
I guess there is north and then there is north. Obviously Findlay Market is a destination. I guess you have to differentiate east from west. Too complicated to suit me. If they provide a map can it be designated this is good, this is not?
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Old 11-25-2012, 02:57 AM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,369,950 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by softballtennis View Post
Hi I'm a 18 year old high school student, University of Cincinnati is my top choice for college. I currently live in Illinois. I was wondering what activities are available to do in cincy? Also I heard the city is very conservative but that doesn't seem like it, because Hamilton County voted democratic this election. Also does cincy have high-end stores and flagship stores. How does the city compare to Chicago?
There is no comparison between Cincinnati and Chicago. Being born and raised in Cincinnati I believe that is good.

You should have no problem finding plenty to do around UC. As suggested, you should visit and decide whether the campus is for you. I am a UC alum, Engineering 1962. My son is a UC alum, Engineering 1986. Hopefully my grandson will also be a UC alum?

You have probably looked at a map to see where UC is located. You will notice it is separated from downtown Cincinnati by some good sized hills defined by the Ohio River. But it is close enough to downtown you can visit there frequently and conveniently. In addition to UC itself, major hospitals and medical facilities are also located in the same general area, locally called Pill Hill. So the students and the medical professionals such as nurses compete for some of the same housing.

If you make the final decision to come to UC, Welcome.

If you get too bored, but have a car, you and a bunch of friends can always drive up to Oxford Ohio, home of Miami University of Ohio, about 31 miles from UC. This is the pretend Ivy League business school of Ohio. But they do know how to party.

The other big party school in Ohio is Ohio University in Athens Ohio. This is about 160 miles from UC. I had personal knowledge of this, as was dating a girl who went there. It was a long drive, but well worth it. Some of the best and most challenging experiences of my collegiate career.

I am sure if you come to UC, you will meet several people who can direct you to other schools to have fun, especially if you provide the car. The University of Louisville is about 2 hours. The University of Kentucky in Lexington is less than 2 hours. Indiana University in Bloomington is about 2-1/2 hours. Ohio State in Columbus is about 1 hour. You can spend an entire career in school here never being in Cincinnati on the weekends if you play your cards right. Of course, you may also flunk out the first semester.

Good Luck!
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Old 11-25-2012, 07:25 AM
 
Location: Covington, KY
1,879 posts, read 2,123,566 times
Reputation: 595
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
There is no comparison between Cincinnati and Chicago. Being born and raised in Cincinnati I believe that is good.

You should have no problem finding plenty to do around UC. As suggested, you should visit and decide whether the campus is for you. I am a UC alum, Engineering 1962. My son is a UC alum, Engineering 1986. Hopefully my grandson will also be a UC alum?

You have probably looked at a map to see where UC is located. You will notice it is separated from downtown Cincinnati by some good sized hills defined by the Ohio River. But it is close enough to downtown you can visit there frequently and conveniently. In addition to UC itself, major hospitals and medical facilities are also located in the same general area, locally called Pill Hill. So the students and the medical professionals such as nurses compete for some of the same housing.

If you make the final decision to come to UC, Welcome.

If you get too bored, but have a car, you and a bunch of friends can always drive up to Oxford Ohio, home of Miami University of Ohio, about 31 miles from UC. This is the pretend Ivy League business school of Ohio. But they do know how to party.

The other big party school in Ohio is Ohio University in Athens Ohio. This is about 160 miles from UC. I had personal knowledge of this, as was dating a girl who went there. It was a long drive, but well worth it. Some of the best and most challenging experiences of my collegiate career.

I am sure if you come to UC, you will meet several people who can direct you to other schools to have fun, especially if you provide the car. The University of Louisville is about 2 hours. The University of Kentucky in Lexington is less than 2 hours. Indiana University in Bloomington is about 2-1/2 hours. Ohio State in Columbus is about 1 hour. You can spend an entire career in school here never being in Cincinnati on the weekends if you play your cards right. Of course, you may also flunk out the first semester.

Good Luck!
All of which is considerably less than all of the colleges and universities around, some considerably closer than Louisville, Lexington, Athens and Bloomington and equally well-respected if not more so.
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Old 11-25-2012, 11:45 AM
 
Location: Beavercreek, OH
2,194 posts, read 3,015,256 times
Reputation: 2334
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
You can spend an entire career in school here never being in Cincinnati on the weekends if you play your cards right. Of course, you may also flunk out the first semester.

Good Luck!
Hi kjbrill--

I almost did that for about a year while attending NKU - although I went to my share of parties in Clifton, I spent most of my weekends either at Miami or UK in Lexington, drinking my rear end off. Of course, my grades suffered quite a bit that year.
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Old 11-26-2012, 07:23 AM
 
5 posts, read 4,951 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flashes1 View Post
Is there is single city in the U.S. with a population over 200,000 that isn't liberal? I can't think of one. If you're looking for liberals, you'll be be very happy to find a great majority.
You should head down to the south. OKC is sitting well over 200K ppl and this city, minus a few minor pockets, is about red as can be. A lot of this area is the same way.
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Old 11-26-2012, 07:47 AM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,369,950 times
Reputation: 1920
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarpathianPeasant View Post
All of which is considerably less than all of the colleges and universities around, some considerably closer than Louisville, Lexington, Athens and Bloomington and equally well-respected if not more so.
I am talking about fun schools, not respected learning institutions.
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Old 11-26-2012, 09:10 AM
 
Location: NW Penna.
1,756 posts, read 3,044,928 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by softballtennis View Post
Hi I'm a 18 year old high school student, University of Cincinnati is my top choice for college. I currently live in Illinois. I was wondering what activities are available to do in cincy? Also I heard the city is very conservative but that doesn't seem like it, because Hamilton County voted democratic this election. Also does cincy have high-end stores and flagship stores. How does the city compare to Chicago?

Visitor's Guide: Cincinnati.Com has links to lists of what stores are in various shopping centers. I'm not sure how you define high-end, haha.

I've always thought that one should choose a college based on academics and value/cost. Type and cost of housing, too, but that's less of an issue now that colleges and Us are transitioning to nice apartment/suite style student housing on campus.

One of my nieces is at Cincinnati Christian U. They aren't party animals, but she and her friends have jobs and they like the town. None of them complain about lack of shopping. But you might need to hit a much larger city like Chicago for that kind of experience. The Ohio cities are nowhere near that big or diverse, is my experience.
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Old 11-26-2012, 09:40 AM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
477 posts, read 530,092 times
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Quote:
Hi I'm a 18 year old high school student, University of Cincinnati is my top choice for college. I currently live in Illinois. I was wondering what activities are available to do in cincy? Also I heard the city is very conservative but that doesn't seem like it, because Hamilton County voted democratic this election. Also does cincy have high-end stores and flagship stores. How does the city compare to Chicago?
As a former Cincinnatian living in Chicago here are some things to watch for:

1) People are more conservative - its not just politics (which your right is shifting), its also in attitude, everything from driving too slow on the road with things like having a min pause before going through a stop light after it turns green to having an attitude similar to how people from Beverly or Franklin Park view outsiders (only its citywide pretty much, though stronger on the west side). High School is unusually important as is your parish and the side of town you grew up on. For Chicago it seems to be only important in Cubs/Sox discussions or if you are in the two neighborhoods (and ones similar to it).

2) People are more reserved. If you act gregarious and outgoing in a Chicago fashion (which I got used to doing) a lot of people won't respond in kind, they seem oddly unwilling to be as open as you are and its almost like they feel kind of threatened by it. Social circles are far more closed, there is a stronger barrier to entry to any social group and while everyone ultimately is tied to another person, (six degrees of separation of everyone) I think its more difficult (not impossible) to make new friends. This is in part due to the lack of transient population that you'll find in Chicago.

3) Attitudes towards transit - people here don't see transit as a viable option unless you have no other option. Having a mentality like a middle class northsider who takes the bus everyday is pretty rare here. There is a growing movement supporting this but it has a long ways to go. There is even an abandoned subway line that was never built due to these attitudes in part (its more complex, I know Jake, I read your book but for simplicity sake...) Consequently the transit system is a tad on the skeletal side, there are a handful of good routes and this site is excellent for deciphering its insane complexity and making it useful for you: Cincinnati Transit Map

4) Attitudes towards city living - much much different. Here is a city that really looks like a real city (unlike almost anything in the Midwest bar Chicago and St. Louis) yet people have a very suburban attitude towards everything. You can see it in the infill that's constructed that looks downright suburban to the fact that the city is way behind on the gentrification curb. Proper city living is just catching on as a mass thing - 20 years behind Chicago, so there are still an unusual amount of abandoned buildings and run down places that would be hip in Chicago (neighborhoods that are even more beautiful versions of Lincoln Park or Wicker Park). All the money for the most part is in more suburban parts of the city (Hyde Park) or outside the city. Along these lines there isn't much good shopping in the city, you have to drive out to Kenwood for the best shops (which would take forever to get to via bus btw). OTR is the only place you can find a handful of the newer trendy places like Gastropubs and what not, though they are pretty late to the game. I think Mt. Adams (one of the only intensely urban yuppie neighborhoods) has a Thai Sushi resturant as well - these are rare not a dime a dozen.

5) Way less diverse - The only current ethnic group that recently immigrated that is really well represented is South Asian (Indian and Pakistani - generally from northern regions though). Consequently the Indian/Pakistani food is excellent in Cincinnati, some of the best I've had, it's like going to Devon avenue (minus the S. Indian spots and banglideshi spots) but that quality is scatted throughout the region. Other than that, good mexican is extremely hard to come by and there are more Chinese carryouts than Thai ones.

6) Culture - Cincinnati is no Chicago but holds up pretty well in terms of TRADITIONAL cultural events. There are fantastic art museums, an aquarium that IMO is better than the Shedd down in Newport across the river, a high quality contemporary art center, good opera/classical music (excellent venue Music Hall for that too). However the city stinks when it comes to film if that's your thing, there are are only 2 arthouses owned by the same guy who has a disdain for what Cincinnatians are capable of watching and tends to only show more mainstream arthouse films that are popular easily 6 months after they show in larger cities. The music scene is surprisingly good too, and from what I've been seeing is getting better but its no match for Chicago (obviously) but there is a nice trajectory where bands that used to pass up Cincy are now playing there, and with things like MPMF and legacy music culture - institutions like the CCM are helping the scene get better.

I hope that helps, I can't really think of anything else right now, but this should be a good primer for getting to know the region from a Chicago perspective.

Last edited by neilworms2; 11-26-2012 at 09:54 AM..
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Old 11-26-2012, 10:56 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,830,579 times
Reputation: 924
One way I see it is: Cincinnati is to Chicago, as Chicago is to New York.
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