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Old 12-07-2012, 01:36 PM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,363,536 times
Reputation: 1919

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Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
My daughter married a Blue Ash boy, so she has learned to make it. I think she only uses ground beef or venison in hers. They are coming for Christmas so maybe I'll make some for my son in law.
There are dozens and dozens of recipes. I have heard of it made from venison but never had any. I also know some people who just get ordinary ground beef at the market, throw it into a pot with regular Quaker Oats, some water and cook it, proclaiming goetta. If they like it fine. If they proclaim this is crap I can understand that too.

To me it is like Mock Turtle Soup. When I was young I liked both Stegner's and Worthmore, made right here in Cincinnati. Stegner's is gone but Worthmore is still here. Read the ingredients on those cans and then try to eat it. Another one of my favorites was Campbell's Pepper Pot Soup, now out of production. I liked both the mock turtle and the pepper pot with the same oyster crackers I sprinkle on Cincinnati chili. Some of us just have weird tastes.
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Old 12-08-2012, 05:58 PM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,363,536 times
Reputation: 1919
Just heard from the daughter who is in Hawaii at Pearl Harbor Naval Base with her military husband. They had their goetta meat on the stove cooking, of course they are several hours behind us. She had posted on her Facebook account she was making goetta. They have been deluged with calls from their new found friends over there inquiring when they will get a taste of this Cincinnati delicacy.

As I have remarked our basic batch recipe yields about 8 2-lb aluminum loaf pans of product. A liberal individual serving is about 3 2-oz slices or 6 servings per pan, 48 servings for the batch, and noone is going hungry.

We had sent her two bag of Dorsels Pin Oats, so she is good to go to make a 2nd batch for her family.

I told her invite everyone who wants to try it over for dinner, and just ask 50 cents per person contribution, that should yield you about $24 towards the meat for your own batch, more than enough.

I am just thrilled that these army wives who originate from all over the US have the common sense to try anything which comes down the pike. Kathy has already experienced pasta, pasteries, and other to die-for recipes from the other wives heritage.
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Old 12-09-2012, 07:23 AM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,363,536 times
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My daughter, after 8 hours of total preparation, posted a picture of her finished goetta on her Facebook account. I will admit it looks somewhat like a pan full of dogfood. But I also know how it tastes, pure Cincinnati heaven.
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Old 12-27-2012, 07:02 AM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,363,536 times
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Another daughter and son-in-law came up Christmas from Lexington. They had planned on staying over and yesterday made another batch of goetta. Son-lin-law was born and raised in Lexington and says they have nothing resembling it. He loves it and wanted to learn the process for making it.

They planned on going home last night but decided against it due to the snow. So we are frying some of the goetta they made for breakfast now.
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Old 12-27-2012, 07:22 AM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
34,549 posts, read 42,724,437 times
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I made my first batch and it was a hit. I used Quaker Steel Cut Oatmeal and half ground beef and half sausage, and an onion in the crock pot. It made 1 big loaf, and 3 small loaves and we used some of it, and DD took the rest down to FL. The secret is that it needs to fry quite a long time to get that nice dark crisp crust on it. She mashes it down, so it becomes totally crispy. I don't know if everyone does that or not.
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Old 12-27-2012, 10:57 AM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,363,536 times
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An easy receipe is just fine if it meats (pun intended) your taste, you can't be too finicky over what is basically peasant food. We will likely continue our old time intensive labor family recipe simply because it is tradition.

On Christmas afternoon a niece and her husband who recently moved back to Cincinnati dropped in to visit. They have a young daughter and this was our first opportunity to see, a real doll. They have not been married too long (two years plus) and were married in Indianapolis so this was the first opportinity for her husband Josh to meet some of the members of the extended family. The first thing my son did was to thrust a Sam Adams Winter Lager into one hand and two buckeyes into the other. My niece said Uncle Ken I heard you made goetta, can I have just a little cup to take home to taste?

My son said Elaine, better than that we have a partial loaf left over from brunch, let me fry you up some right now.

As a side note, I have always fried goetta using a cast iron skillet. But I have been having difficulty with it sticking lately. I know most of the problem is I have destroyed the seasoning on my cast iron ware by washing and scrubbing it with soap, a definite nono.

My son had brought along a non-stick electric frypan. He set it on low heat, I think about 225 and just let it fry, turning occasionally. It was perfection, the goetta formed a nice brown crust. I can guarantee my wife will come home soon with a new electric frypan. She will not trust me when I say I cann reseason the cast iron ware. She will just say yes like the umpteen things you could correct over our 50 years of marriage, most of which fizzled.

Once the goetta was fried, Elaine stuck some of it into her husband Josh's mouth. What is this he asked? She replied just eat it then we will tell you what it is. After a few bites, Josh said Pretty good, but what is it? That is when we all said Josh welcome to the Brill family! You can stay around.

They, and my brother and SIL ended up hanging around for dinner. In addition to a Christmas ham commented about in other threads, the wife had a few other items.

We had prepared these on Christmas Eve day.

One was what she called a winter Waldorf Salad. I believe the applies were Granny Smiths, since they still retain a firm texture this time of year. Let's just say she made a huge bowl and it was a huge hit.

Another was a homemade potato au gratin which she made in two pyrex baking dishes. I know when she was cooking the potatoes on the stove they were already in a cheese sauce, but I don't know what kind of cheese. I do know they already had heavy cream in the picture, as I helped dish it into the baking dishes. After putting it into the baking dishes, I know we put at least 1/2" of shredded cheese on top. I love cheese so no problem with that. We baked it covered with aluminum foil and then pulled them out for chilling and reheating on Christmas.

The third dish was a vegetable lasagna, in this case primarily spinich with some chopped broccoli added. Someone else commented in one of these threads about a lasagna on Christmas. I don't remember just what all cheeses my wife put in this one other than the ricotta, and the parmesan on top. I am sure we had a bag of provolone. I just remember heating the sauce up in a large skillet with what I believe was half-half as the liquid. I do know the noodles were the new syle lasagna baking noodles where you do not precook them. I was a little skeptical of that. But it was the hit of the party , people exclaiming they didn't know a vegetable lasagna could be so good. Once again we baked them to a point on Christmas Eve with aluminum foil covers and then took them out and refrigerated. On Christmas back into the oven on low heat to just reheat. I believe it was the slow reheat which enchanced the flavor, sort of why chili and stew taste better on the second day.
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Old 12-27-2012, 06:11 PM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,363,536 times
Reputation: 1919
We were going to cook up another batch of goetta today. But the person who was going to come and help do it to learn the process couldn't get out of their driveway up near Oxford. So we had to postpone.

Our daughter took the opportunity to cook her fresh turkey. She went to the local butcher last week and said she wanted to order a fresh turkey with the Bernards label. The person waiting on her asked how many people she planned to serve - she replied 1. After a very strange look another person who is our neighbor and works in the shop came over and said Hi. Karen said I want to buy a turkey just for myself. I cook it, complete with dressing and all, slice it down and make lunches to take to work. I add the type of veggies I like and control the salt, etc. which goes into the total. The daughter is very health conscious and at age 48 is about a size 4, maybe smaller. So she puts in the effort to make her own frozen turkey lunches for work. Marie Callender never dreamt of such a good frozen dinner.
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Old 02-17-2013, 02:20 PM
 
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kjbrill, maybe I missed it in another of your posts, but what spices do you use in your goetta? (That is, if you care to reveal the secret.) I moved to Oregon from Northern Kentucky 5 years ago and I'm really craving good goetta.
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Old 02-17-2013, 04:59 PM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,363,536 times
Reputation: 1919
Quote:
Originally Posted by WLuckyJim View Post
kjbrill, maybe I missed it in another of your posts, but what spices do you use in your goetta? (That is, if you care to reveal the secret.) I moved to Oregon from Northern Kentucky 5 years ago and I'm really craving good goetta.
We don't use a lot of spices. The meat is cooked in beef stock with bay leaves. We also put carrots, onions, and celery stalks in the pot while cooking the meat. My wife will add some thyme, but that is about it. We like what the vegetables contribute to the broth and the taste of the oats cooked in it, and once they are ground into the meat you hardly know they are there. Our main spice is the coarse ground black pepper which we use liberally when mixing the ground meat and oats together. I know other people use a variety of spices in their goetta and I have no problem with that, we just don't. You kind of like what you grew up with. We use at least 6 ounces of ground black pepper per batch which is about 7 loaf trays of goetta. And I always add more to mine when I fry it.

BTW, for years I fried the goetta in a cast iron skillet. This past Christmas my son was given the job of frying the goetta for the Christmas brunch. He brought his non-stick electric skillet along. Fried that goetta to perfection, brown crust and all on low heat. The next week my wife bought an electric skillet which we used to fry the rest of our goetta. It is now her favorite appliance.

I still like my cast iron for such as the dutch oven I make pot roast and chili in. Take that dutch oven to cook about any kind of beef roast in the oven. I use it to cook sirloin tip or rolled rump as a whole roast or chuck as a pot roast. The only thing I vary is the cooking time, as I always cook at 325 degrees. For chili it is on the stove top, and whether southwest style where I brown the cubed round steak first or Cincinnati style where I just dump the ground beef into the water, it does a great job.
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Old 02-17-2013, 06:10 PM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,363,536 times
Reputation: 1919
I thought I should make a few comments concerning goetta. Those of us who like the homemade can sometimes be a little defensive of our process. That is not so say a simpler procedure is not OK. We treat our goetta as a family heirloom, handed down for generations. Others have their own variations which they are entitled to.

This year, we have made 4 batches. They all turned out very well. For what we call a batch is 5 lbs of pork shoulder and 5 lbs of beef short ribs in a large pot with carrots, onions, and celery stalks with some Bay Leaves. To enhance the flavor fill the pot with beef stock instead of water. Cook the meat until everything is falling off the bone. Put the meat into a collander to cool and strain the broth into a separate container, 16 cups required. Take that bag of Dorsels Steel-Cut Pin-Oats. If you can't find them have someone in Cincinnati purchase and send them to you.

To cook the oats you start with the bag of oats in a large pot with a heat disperser under it, like a couple of cake wire cooling racks. You start out with the bag of oats and 4 cups
of broth over low heat. The oats absorb liquid very slowly. As the mixture thickens you add more broth until all 16 cups have been used. You use a slotted large metal spoon to do the stirring so the oats do not scorch. When that spoon will stand up in the middle of the pot without falling over the oats are done. No cheating now. If the oats are too watery the goetta will not fry correctly.

As I have said, this years batches have been very good. In fact my grandkids have commented Grandpa this goetta is good. So what is the difference? Very simple, this year we bought all of the meat from a local butcher. Yes, we paid more per pound. When you are talking your signature family heirloom dish who gives a damn?
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