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Old 12-03-2012, 05:05 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati(Silverton)
1,576 posts, read 2,303,702 times
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Desirable? I doubt it. The place lost it's punch since the nearby Ford motor plant closed in Batavia. Although they are redeveloping the site. It maybe desirable for those from South-East Ohio, but not for city people, unless they want land and want to build something out in the sticks.
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Old 12-03-2012, 05:26 PM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,367,556 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by unusualfire View Post
Desirable? I doubt it. The place lost it's punch since the nearby Ford motor plant closed in Batavia. Although they are redeveloping the site. It maybe desirable for those from South-East Ohio, but not for city people, unless they want land and want to build something out in the sticks.
It is surprising how many people do desire to live out in those sticks. People who want land to keep animals on for example. Some people like nothing better than to have a couple of horses and actually get out and ride them. Others like to graze a few head of cattle, maybe a hog or two, and take them to the local slaughterhouse for butchering and some fine eating. And if you have an acre or two to devote to a large vegetable garden you can eat non-contaminated food most of the year. Not everyone believes breathing the polluted air of the city is the best life for them.
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Old 12-03-2012, 05:39 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,829,904 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by unusualfire View Post
Desirable? I doubt it. The place lost it's punch since the nearby Ford motor plant closed in Batavia. Although they are redeveloping the site. It maybe desirable for those from South-East Ohio, but not for city people, unless they want land and want to build something out in the sticks.
Sounds like there is no economy there anymore. Sad to hear. Dig that on city people. I am not comfortable in the boonies. Get too bored and don't know what to do with myself.
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Old 12-03-2012, 05:47 PM
 
Location: Mason, OH
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TomJones123 View Post
Sounds like there is no economy there anymore. Sad to hear. Dig that on city people. I am not comfortable in the boonies. Get too bored and don't know what to do with myself.
The Ford Motor Plant closed how many years ago? Yes it was a loss of incomes. But so was the closing of DHL in Wilmington. These small cities survived before those companies were there and they will survive after they leave. They may not explode in new subdivisions, but the country economy they were originally built on is still there.
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Old 12-03-2012, 06:50 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
31,199 posts, read 57,331,348 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by unusualfire View Post
It maybe desirable for those from South-East Ohio, but not for city people, unless they want land and want to build something out in the sticks.
I know more than a few people from Cincinnati or Dayton who moved into towns like Batavia and Williamsburg, or Waynesville and Spring Valley, to embrace the small-town life. They didn't get bored. It depends what you want out of life. To each his/her own.
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Old 12-04-2012, 06:24 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
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Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
They didn't get bored. It depends what you want out of life. To each his/her own.
I lived in New Bremen for several years and felt like it was a slow, boring death. I could never quite get used to things, though I developed an appreciation for a lot of things.
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Old 12-04-2012, 06:39 AM
 
Location: "Daytonnati"
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I thing the small towns around here are charming but for me just nice to look at/visit. Living in one...maybe not! However, if people like that life, there is no better place that W/SW Ohio, IMO.
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Old 12-04-2012, 04:10 PM
 
Location: Cambridge, MA
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I opened this thread because of what kjbrill mentioned. Since he asked, I can answer before steering things back on track.

Williamsburg of Cincinnati was carved out of the former Meyers dairy farm at the end of the 1960's. (The still-"desirable" Evergreen retirement/assisted-living community is in another section of the same plot.) In the beginning, Williamsburg was greeted with great fanfare. Gated neighborhoods were a novelty. In order to get past either gate to the complex, one had to check in with security staff who were on duty pretty much all the time (though scaling the low brick walls around the perimeter wouldn't pose much of a challenge.) Young couples, small families, and empty-nesters were all clamoring to occupy a unit there whether it be an apartment or townhouse. Local companies kept spaces there for use by newly relocated or dislocated employees. Goyguy family friends were able to stay in a Williamsburg townhouse after their own house was heavily damaged by fire. We also "pitched our tent" there after having been sent abroad for P & G and before the lease of our home's tenant ran out. Among our neighbors were a P & G family from Japan just getting settled and seeking a place to call their own.
That was then, this is now. From a distance, the brick apartment houses and the townhouse clusters look as nice as ever. A large fountain still "plays" as you enter from Galbraith Rd. But the staffed guardhouses are gone, the main one replaced by an ATM. Management has changed over several times of late, with the only constant being that the company is based out of town. More significantly, it was decided a few owners ago that some Section 8 tenants would be allowed. This has brought with it the typically associated issues. MOST S8 renters are deserving of the subsidy and are fine as neighbors, but some "ruin it for the rest" with noise and criminal activity. Things such as petty larceny are now common occurrences. Every once in a while something more major like an armed robbery or home invasion takes place. Last year a "disturbed" tenant even set her apartment on fire while neighbors and family members were inside.
Correspondingly, my family now doesn't know anybody who lives there although a small number of acquaintances were still on the premises until a few years back. (Two died, one transitioned to assisted living, and another bailed after being "terrified" by S8 people.)
The latest turnover in management may change matters for the better. But my sense is that "the horse is out of the barn" and it'll stay status quo.

As for the Williamsburg of the thread title, it would definitely fall more on the "suburban" side of "semi-rural" than Blanchester, where folks are still very insular and there aren't all that many new people in town.
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Old 12-10-2012, 06:05 PM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,367,556 times
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Yes, I am sure the Williamsburg Apartment Complex is not the level it was in the 1960s, what is, we are talking 50 years later. Trying to remember the original owner, he had a large old house on the original property.

The Williamsburg in Clermont Co. will survive. The closing of the Ford Plant may slow down the rate of development, but it will still develop. Those who want to reverse the decline of our cities are making some inroads, but they are still far from stopping the suburban expansion all over the country. Take Texas for example, the suburban expansion there is absolutely unbelievable.
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