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Old 12-13-2012, 01:58 PM
 
25 posts, read 18,027 times
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I've been on Walnut Hills Redevelopment Foundation's page and was impressed with some of their ideas and the push to preserve the buildings. I think a redeveloped Walnut Hills would have as much impact on the city as a redeveloped Over the Rhine because it would connect uptown and downtown with the east side neighborhoods, like you said. However it seems that they are having difficulties coming up with funding. There is no 3CDC in Walnut Hills.
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Old 12-13-2012, 02:03 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
477 posts, read 531,643 times
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Quote:
I've been educating myself on how this so called urban renewal of the 50/60s had a major hand in destroying many inner city neighborhoods all across the country. Many of the neighborhoods that were wiped out were black...coincidence? Just imagine if we still had Kenyon Barr in Cincinnati instead of what's left of it (West End) and what it is now (Queensgate/ I-75.)
If you can find it, its kind of an academic tome, but there is a book that describes as a case study in great detail what happened to the west end. Not only that but it discusses how Mayor Mallory's father basically saved the Dayton Street area (Brighton) which was going to also be urban renewed to death as well. Its only one case study, so try to track it down in the library if you can:

Contested Ground: Collective Action and the Urban Neighborhood: John Emmius Davis: 9780801499050: Amazon.com: Books
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Old 12-13-2012, 02:07 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
477 posts, read 531,643 times
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A serious effort is afoot to revitalize Walnut Hills, a trend that would be underway by itself if Metromoves had passed in 2002 and a light rail line was in operation presently on Gilbert Avenue. But if the current momentum can be maintained for another 10 years, it's conceivable that OTR, Corryville, and Walnut Hills will all be gentrified neighborhoods and safe to walk at night. This will mean the nice area I described in the first paragraph will be contiguous all the way to downtown and Clifton Gaslight.
Its great that this is the trend, and I think Cincy is picking up on mass gentrification that's happened in other cities without structural economic issues earlier.

There is only one issue, Corryville in the process of gentrifying is loosing its historic building stock at an alarming rate. Its kind of a shame that in the 1990s the powers that be decided to demolish it all. Its solid urban fabric, but at the loss of much character that the area once had. Walnut Hills is sad too, but at the very least they appear to be trying to keep as much as possible. Don't forget Mt. Adams too, I think a revitalized WH would be a big boon to Mt. Adams as well, making the neighborhood at least somewhat less isolated. (The Kroger in WH is almost walkable too, now if only there was a stronger transit connection).
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Old 12-13-2012, 02:49 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,844,393 times
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Originally Posted by jmecklenborg View Post
Yes, we all know some of it is in pretty bad shape, and that although the very nice historic areas are very nice they are not connected to one another.
To at least a marked degree, Cincinnati's hilly terrain make it difficult to have contiguous neighborhoods. To some extent anyway.
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Old 12-13-2012, 02:58 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,844,393 times
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No way. That's the very one I have been reading.

Contested Ground: Collective Action and the Urban Neighborhood - John Emmeus Davis - Google Books

Thanks for the link, my friend.
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Old 12-13-2012, 03:13 PM
 
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Back in September I drove around for a few hours with a writer from National Geographic Traveler Magazine who was doing a "hidden gems" type of article that'll probably appear next spring. He was absolutely blown away by the Dayton St. area, especially after scanning the codes on the realtor signs with his phone and seeing that the mansions are selling for under $50,000. That is an area where you definitely need to buy with cash, I doubt any bank will lend in that area.

But I do predict that it too will turn around quickly in the next ten years because it's the closest area to downtown with single-family homes, which are traditionally the easiest to get loans for and obviously to manage. In fact I've been pressing people to extend the streetcar line in that direction for this reason.
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Old 12-13-2012, 04:15 PM
 
Location: Chicago(Northside)
3,719 posts, read 5,892,650 times
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Originally Posted by NicoleRic View Post
I apologize for feeding the troll, but I can't resist. The Louisville fanboy was making me laugh. Louisville might be bohemian for small town Kentuckians but hardly compared to larger cities. I was reading an article the other day written by Louisville natives who recently took a trip to both Louisville and Cincinnati. The writer commented how much more vibrant downtown Cincy and OTR were compared to Louisville and the NULU district. The writer even stated that there was hardly anyone walking the streets in Louisville and asked Cincy to "send the redevelopment juice downstream."

A/N Blog . Cincinnati is Recovering From the Swine Flu
Dont worry we all do it, its fun messing around with them
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Old 12-13-2012, 04:15 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,844,393 times
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Originally Posted by neilworms2 View Post
There is only one issue, Corryville in the process of gentrifying is loosing its historic building stock at an alarming rate.
IMO, the problem with Corryville is the same that has already happened in CUF. UC is growing and landlords are snapping up distressed properties to use for student housing. I predict it will become another UC student dominated neighborhood, and maybe more so than Clifton Heights. Clifton Heights still has a lot of families, professionals, working class folks, doctors, etc. And of course the closer to campus the more students there are.

Oh, and knocking down blocks of historic buildings and replacing them with crappy, cheap apartments aimed at students is at the root of the problem.
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Old 12-13-2012, 04:50 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
477 posts, read 531,643 times
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IMO, the problem with Corryville is the same that has already happened in CUF. UC is growing and landlords are snapping up distressed properties to use for student housing. I predict it will become another UC student dominated neighborhood, and maybe more so than Clifton Heights. Clifton Heights still has a lot of families, professionals, working class folks, doctors, etc. And of course the closer to campus the more students there are.
From what I've seen the last time I was there to check out my old stomping grounds - it already has. Its only a matter of time before its complete.
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Old 12-13-2012, 05:04 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,844,393 times
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Originally Posted by neilworms2 View Post
From what I've seen the last time I was there to check out my old stomping grounds - it already has. Its only a matter of time before its complete.
Ya, you are right, it's well underway.
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