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Old 12-06-2012, 08:54 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,836,474 times
Reputation: 924

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OTR, Prospect Hill, CUF, Clifton Gaslight, Northside....uh ya. You will find what you want here. The guy that cuts my hair is Buddhist. Cincinnati has what you want. Most people that post here don't live in the neighborhoods I mentioned, and are either in the very conservative suburbs where you will not fit in, or not even in Cincinnati.

My brother-in law lives in Portland and came here for a visit a few months ago. He loved it here. And of course I showed him all the above mentioned neighborhoods and took him to local spots in all of them. Cincinnati fits the bill.
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Old 12-06-2012, 09:38 AM
 
Location: "Daytonnati"
4,245 posts, read 5,762,339 times
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Actually Louisvillle, about 1.5 hrs downriver from CIncy, is being called the "Portland of the South" (tho I tnink Austin would beg to differ), and would be a good fit for you, from what you describe of yourselves.

HOWEVER, since you have good potential connections into the medical & buisness world via yr spouses family Id say CIncy would be better...if only for that reason.

Comments about 'where to live" are pertinent. As others have said: Northside. This would be the best fit.

Over The Rhine (OTR)(which is not small town but an area of 4-5 story brick tenements close to downtown)...perhaps. Findlay Market is the attraction there.

Also the Clifton & UC areas (more like Northside), and maybe Oakley and Columbia/Tusculum and perhaps Mount Lookout.


@@@

I cant compare Cincy with Portland or Seattle since I have not been to these cities. You mentioned bikes. Cincy doesn't seem very bikeable due to the hills, but they do have one of those bike co-ops (located in Northside).
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Old 12-06-2012, 09:48 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,836,474 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dayton Sux View Post
Cincy doesn't seem very bikeable due to the hills, but they do have one of those bike co-ops (located in Northside).
It's bikeable providing you are in really good shape, or have a bike with a bail out gear and aren't afraid to use it.

Then there are certain streets like Straight and Ravine. If you can pedal up either of those you are one bad dude. City buses do have bike racks on the front of them, so one can always take the bus up the hill. I haven't been brave enough to attempt any of the hills going up to the west side. They are long and steep.
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Old 12-06-2012, 10:04 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
3,335 posts, read 5,738,252 times
Reputation: 2058
Quote:
Originally Posted by rhizohm View Post
Hello Everyone!
Hello, welcome, thanks for the thread!
Quote:
Originally Posted by rhizohm View Post
Thanks for taking a moment to read this thread.

I am a native of Wisconsin who has been living in Seattle Washington for the last 6 years. I moved out here for a variety of reasons, most prominently to go to school for Acupuncture and East Asian Medicine, but also because I enjoy the progressive culture that the Pacific Northwest cities offer. Now my fiance & business partner and I are thinking of moving to Cincinnati at the encouragement of her family, who is connected to the medical and business community there. Financially it is a great fit-- we are fortunate to have an open-minded MD in the family who is excited about promoting our East Asian medical practice-- while Seattle and Portland are notorious for having relatively "saturated" markets for our field. Also, real estate is obviously more affordable and frankly of higher quality in Cincinnati, which is nice. However, we are concerned about whether we will fit in and be able to enjoy the way of life, culturally speaking, that we do out here in the PNW.
Where are you from in Wisconsin? Think of Cincinnati as an older Milwaukee but with more traditional east coast and southern influences.

First, I do think you'll find a number of people receptive to your East Asian medical practice. But be warned that medically, Cincinnati is very conservative. What I mean is that new ideas are not embraced unless there is such a tremendous amount of scientific and scholarly evidence and research that keeping with the old way would be simply imprudent and irresponsible. So the key is going to be figuring out a way to tie in your medical practice with existing norms...don't rock the boat, so to speak. If you can achieve this, I think you'll be pleasantly surprised to overwhelmed with the number of customers you find.

Regarding cheaper land and real estate - yes, it's cheaper, but not necessarily as cheap as people expect. Taxes are relatively high here. When you calculate some mortgage payment online, add another 50% to that payment to account for taxes and insurance. I'm not sure what you mean about quality, but I believe that Craftmanship on everything here is superior to anything in the west, at any time period, including the present. That is a big statement, but I think it is true. Does this affect quality of life? Probably not.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rhizohm View Post
To give you an idea of our cultural disposition, Portland is kind of our ideal city. It is bikeable, transit-oriented, has composting and other green programs, supports local business and art, and hosts one of the most socially progressive populations in the country, while still maintaining a not-too-big, almost small-town feel.
We have our pockets like this, but Portland is in a totally different league. A place like Portland, you take all the uber progressives from around the country and put them in one city. The envelope is constantly pushed and amazing things can happen. In Cincinnati, you have people living their lives and doing their thing but also supporting certain movements. Pushing the progressive envelope and figuring out new, better (?) ways to live isn't embraced here the same way as other cities.
Quote:
Originally Posted by rhizohm View Post
Seattle is also great, and similar culturally, but is more expensive and much harder to get around due to topography. Seattle has more ethnic/racial and international diversity, which is a plus, but cost of living and navigability push us more toward Portland. Both cities also have a great culture of supporting local, organic foods.
Not much to say here. Cincinnati's development was historically in hospitable hills and valleys. We've carved up the hillsides a fair amount these days, however.
Quote:
Originally Posted by rhizohm View Post
We are both Buddhist/Daoist and feel great to have those communities out here in the PNW. We realize that moving to Cincinnati would be sacrificing that--none of the lineages we practice are represented there. However, part of Buddhist/Daoist living is finding a way to take the middle path, lead a moderate life and be able to actually spend time meditating and cultivating. The more reasonable cost of living and the financial prospects that Cincinnati offers certainly support having more freedom in that sense. Also, Cincinnati seems to need people teaching things like meditation and Qigong, which we can do! Most of our family and connections in Cincy are Catholic, which we love and respect, but we are concerned about finding acceptance and more importantly like-minded community.
I don't know the first thing about Buddhism or Daoism but I expect that religiously you will feel more than a little marginalized. I've noticed that the non-religious here tend to have what I would consider an unhealthy hostility towards religion. This is a shame and it divides us.

I strive to find the middle path myself. I have had wonderful success in Cincinnati building a moderate life that balances family, friends, and professional obligations. Part of this ties into the friendliness of locals and the cost of living, I think. This must be one of the easiest places in the country to make enough money to live.
Quote:
Originally Posted by rhizohm View Post
We don't hunt, we're not into professional sports, I drink microbrew beer (love those German and Belgian beers too!) and only fair-trade coffee or tea, we eat mostly organic, we like to dance to house music, world-beat, salsa, samba, etc or listen to progressive folk music live, and we are not planning to have children. We make green choices, have semi-open relationship boundaries, support local business and artisans and generally refuse to shop at big-box retail. My ideal existence would involve walking and biking as my primary modes of transportation.
Hunting? If I bring up hunting, people look at me like I just got off the train from Appalachia.

Sports? Yes, people here are into sports! Supporting our college (UC, Xavier) and pro (Bengals, Reds) is a way of life here. I can't sit down for a whole game but I try to catch the highlights so that I know what people are talking about.

Beer? I could go on and on about this topic. I'm literally not sure where to begin. Cincinnati has a long brewing history, not unlike Milwaukee. The homebrewing scene here is mature and robust. There are far fewer microbreweries here than in Portland. This is one of a few places with local beer available that costs $7 for a 12 pack (this is for adjunct-heavy american light lager type). There are three main craft breweries that bottle and offer solid products in the price range more typical of craft breweries.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rhizohm View Post
I am 28 and my partner is 30. I personally don't identify as "intellectual" and see the word a little pejoratively as a person who tries to lead a Heart-first existence, but when I lived in Wisconsin it was a frequent charge against me by people who found my resistance to eating processed food products and shopping at Walmart unreasonable and "elitist." My partner is known for being more liberal and outspoken than I am on many social issues.
You'll get the elitist thing here, too. With companies like Kroger and P&G being built here, we practically wrote the book on consumerism.
Quote:
Originally Posted by rhizohm View Post
Will we fit in in Cincinnati? Certainly we are encouraged by seeing more urban renewal in the OTR region, which probably has the potential to support our more walkable, bikeable and urbane existence in the near future. And I personally LOVE Cincinnati's climate-- best in the nation perhaps only second to Oakland, CA, in my opinion. The architecture is also phenomenal and we are excited to see the OTR Foundation promoting sustainable and green redevelopment in the region while preserving historic architecture.
The architecture here is second to none. It is tough because so many amazing buildings have been underused and abandoned. Combine that with urban crime and it is hard to balance needs of the future (having this amazing building stock) with needs of the present (the house next door is a crack-house that no one will redevelop). What to do with all these buildings is an ongoing topic of conversation around here.
Quote:
Originally Posted by rhizohm View Post
So can a progressive/green, early 30s, semi-polyamorous, Buddhist/Daoist couple not planning to have children really find community in Cincinnati?
If you are friendly, good to your friends, and willing to include people who don't share all of your views among your friends, you will have no problem finding community here.

Is it a perfect fit? Only you can decide that. For me, living in Cincinnati does sometimes feel like swimming upstream. But if you can learn to let down your guard and not constantly consult with the chips on your shoulder, this can be a wonderful and even ideal place to live.

I'm sure you'll spend a long time considering and reconsidering. Sometimes people move somewhere and bounce back because they had unrealistic expectations. All we can do is what feels right at the time. We're in some ways lucky to live in a day and age where anyone can live in any pocket of the country and pick up and move at any time.
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Old 12-06-2012, 12:43 PM
 
Location: OH
361 posts, read 547,685 times
Reputation: 469
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Originally Posted by cali3448893 View Post
Another troll fellas...What would really put people in misery is living in maryland, high taxes, high crime, progressiveness is a no no their and i wont say the last one because it would be very ignorant of me to say! Cincinnati rocks!!!
I didn't have time to type out a detailed post earlier, so I'm not surprised my comment was taken out of context and denounced as a troll post. BTW, I pretty much agree 100% with what Sarah Perry said.

To elaborate, the OP sounds like a pretty far left/radical person. My gf and I are pretty much just typical, run-of-the-mill liberals you find on the east coast. In Cincinnati however, our views felt pretty far left compared to many of the "liberals" in the area. Additionally, I've found many of the self-proclaimed liberals that are native to the Cincinnati area are from conservative families; so while they might be liberal compared to a lot of their family, they are moderate in actuality. Cincinnati also lies at the extreme northern edge of the Bible Belt, so evangelicalism has a large influence on the area. We are not religious and do not attend church, so a lot of the area felt a bit too religious for us. We have no problem at all with people attending church, believing in a higher power and things of that sort, but we had people offering to "save" and "heal" us, and inquiring about our beliefs when politely declined invitations to church.

Here in Maryland there are more of the live and let live type liberals, and we still found Cincinnati to be a bit of a culture shock. I'd imagine the cultural differences would be that much more pronounced coming from the PNW where you have more of the in your face, advocate for change type liberals.

As for my using the word "misery" in my post, it was mostly hyperbole. The OP could probably find Cincinnati tolerable, but don't expect to find a large circle of like-minded people. Having a good, solid social circle is essential for a lot of people's well-being. Being that our ideologies did not mesh with a lot of people in the area, it sometimes made it difficult to gain acquaintances and friends. While we weren't miserable, we certainly weren't happy living in the area either. I think a combination of our views and the fact we had no ties to the area contributed to our unhappiness. The OP did mention having family connections in the area, so that's a big plus.

As the OP mentioned, we received a few accusations of being "elitist" because of my girlfriend's dislike of Wal-Mart, and because I do not drink alcohol. We also encountered people who could not fathom why we would ride Metro when we had two late model cars.

Overall, Cincinnati isn't a bad area and there was a lot of work being done during our time there. However, looking at the OP's interests and desires, I would not be surprised if he/she moves to Cincinnati and ends up disliking it after the novelty of the aesthetic beauty wears off. But hey, you won't know until you try it. Living in Cincy was an experience I liked, it's something I can add to the list of things I've done and want to do, and it helped advance my career.
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Old 12-06-2012, 01:20 PM
 
2,886 posts, read 3,960,096 times
Reputation: 1499
This is such an interesting thread that I'd like to make an additional comment. OP, I've had some first-hand contact with the demographic segment you seem to be coming from.

Here's the potential problem that makes me feel Cincinnati doesn't seem like such a good fit for you. Yes, if you choose carefully you can find a small community of people for whom your interest in polyamory, for example, won't seem outrageous. This is a big metro area, and as such, all kinds of people are represented here. What may quickly begin to wear on you, though, is the prevailing attitude where you start to feel you often have to conceal aspects of who you are every time you're outside your immediate circle of friends. Even as a middle-class, "conventional" married woman in my 60s and of pretty mainstream views, I experience this feeling regularly. So that's why I bring it up.

Cincinnati has a low cost of living, beautiful terrain, and friendly people (as long as they approve of you) to recommend it. And as previously mentioned, being the worldwide hq of Proctor and Gamble also helps a lot. But if I were you, I'd still think long and hard about settling here for any real length of time. Can you come on a trial basis and have a backup plan?
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Old 12-06-2012, 02:50 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,836,474 times
Reputation: 924
I'll bet a dollar to a dime that those who say the OP should not live here live out in the very conservative suburbs. Just saying.

OP - read this link to see what I am talking about.

The Urbanophile Blog Archive Cincinnati vs. Cincinnati
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Old 12-06-2012, 06:26 PM
 
2,886 posts, read 3,960,096 times
Reputation: 1499
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomJones123 View Post
I'll bet a dollar to a dime that those who say the OP should not live here live out in the very conservative suburbs. Just saying.

OP - read this link to see what I am talking about.

The Urbanophile Blog Archive Cincinnati vs. Cincinnati
Since Wahl Wrighter doesn't live here anymore, you may be referring to me. I'm not going to name my neighborhood here, but suffice to say that it's an inner ring suburb, one of the areas developed immediately post WWII. The people I referenced having known who I believe are a similar demographic to the OP mostly live in or around Clifton or North Avondale.

It might be helpful to the OP to know how long you've lived in Cincinnati, as well as how many parts of the metro area you've lived in. Could you refresh our memory on that?
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Old 12-06-2012, 06:35 PM
 
2,886 posts, read 3,960,096 times
Reputation: 1499
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dayton Sux View Post
Actually Louisvillle, about 1.5 hrs downriver from CIncy, is being called the "Portland of the South" (tho I tnink Austin would beg to differ), and would be a good fit for you, from what you describe of yourselves.

HOWEVER, since you have good potential connections into the medical & buisness world via yr spouses family Id say CIncy would be better...if only for that reason.

Comments about 'where to live" are pertinent. As others have said: Northside. This would be the best fit.

Over The Rhine (OTR)(which is not small town but an area of 4-5 story brick tenements close to downtown)...perhaps. Findlay Market is the attraction there.

Also the Clifton & UC areas (more like Northside), and maybe Oakley and Columbia/Tusculum and perhaps Mount Lookout.


@@@

I cant compare Cincy with Portland or Seattle since I have not been to these cities. You mentioned bikes. Cincy doesn't seem very bikeable due to the hills, but they do have one of those bike co-ops (located in Northside).
I used to spend quite a bit of time in Louisville. Speaking in very general terms I also suspect it might be a better fit than Cincinnati. And despite what I consider a dearth of attributes that matter to me specifically, I can say with considerable assurance that Lexington--where I lived for more than 30 years--would be a better fit. OP, would you consider something with an unmet market for your medical specialty that's within easy driving distance of Cincinnati?
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Old 12-06-2012, 10:28 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,836,474 times
Reputation: 924
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sarah Perry View Post
I can say with considerable assurance that Lexington--where I lived for more than 30 years--would be a better fit.
Ohhh....so you are a Lexington fan?.....

....so get off the Cinci forums...cause u sure don't belong....
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