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Old 12-08-2012, 05:36 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati (Norwood)
3,389 posts, read 3,726,855 times
Reputation: 1764

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natural510 View Post
Columbus is probably the only Ohio city which would welcome something along those lines. The rest are too stodgy and old-school, even Cleveland with its blue-collar Democrat demographic...
Is this the same Ohio city that still struggles with its woefully inadequate public transportation system (COTA), a talked about, but non existent BART, and not one inch of LRT going anywhere? (just asking... )
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Old 12-08-2012, 07:10 AM
 
2,886 posts, read 3,970,784 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rhizohm View Post
Thank you for all the thoughtful and helpful replies.

TomJones123 and others who have recommended specific neighborhoods in Cincy, thank you. We will definitely look into these. My fiance agrees that these neighborhoods seem to be where we should look. It has been a while since she lived in Cincy, and it seems that both she and the city have changed a lot, in ways that may be helpful. From what I gather and guess, it seems Cincy has become a little more progressive, while I know she has become little less flamboyantly liberal, lol. And she really loves her family, some of whom are very conservative, but a few of whom actually really share our views on a lot.

When visiting Cincy, I was happy to see that the brand of conservatism is more along the German/Irish Catholic demographic. Of course, there are also many Catholics who are quite liberal, and Catholics generally promote education, the arts and progressive social works. I grew up in a small Catholic town in Wisconsin, so this demographic is familiar to me. Not to mention Cincy is a Jesuit hotbed, and the Jesuits were actually some of the first Western scholars to open up dialogue with China and translate some of our medical texts.

By the way, while I have definitely emphasized our liberal traits (because these seem to be the factors that have the greatest risk of not meshing well in Cincinnati), I don't actually identify as radical and definitely not the "in your face" kind of liberal. My partner is a little more leftist than me, but if you saw or interacted with me in person, you'd probably think me more of an "urbane moderate." I don't dress weird, definitely no punk/alternative clothes, no bumper stickers, I don't mimic political views just because they are liberal, etc, lol. I have definitely encountered a few people out here on the West Coast that were "too radical" for me, such as people who believe that disciplining your kids is fascism, people who hate religion, extreme political correctness, etc.

Also, of course, we don't have the need to be validated by everyone sharing our views on everything. I will admit that it has been nice to be in Washington state where we take certain progressive views for granted. However, as long as there is a decent contingent of people we can relate to, speak openly with and agree with, we will personally be fine.

But, for example, I really love that Seattle has banned plastic bags and styrofoam take-out boxes and implemented a composting program for food and yard waste. And it is fiscally-viable because the city profits off making and selling the resultant compost! I would love to live in a city where there's enough of a contingent of progressive individuals that we might actually be able to make something like that happen...
It sounds like you're going to be fine. Based on this amplified description, I would modify my attempt to discourage you away from Cincinnati down to a mild warning that it will probably not ever meet your ideals in some respects. But you sound flexible that way.
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Old 12-08-2012, 07:15 AM
 
2,886 posts, read 3,970,784 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natural510 View Post
Columbus is probably the only Ohio city which would welcome something along those lines. The rest are too stodgy and old-school, even Cleveland with its blue-collar Democrat demographic. Yellow Springs is the "Berkeley" of the state, but it's a small village and not an option if you crave urban living.
Hope I'm not veering too far off topic, but I was in Yellow Springs last spring and was relieved to see the town apparently doing much as always. Not sure exactly what the arrangement is, but Antioch has reopened in a newish building and even though it doesn't look like a conventional campus, I guess at least it can continue to function as an economic engine for the town. OP, if you settle here Yellow Springs will at least make a fun little day trip for you.
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Old 12-08-2012, 08:07 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati (Norwood)
3,389 posts, read 3,726,855 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rhizohm View Post
...When visiting Cincy, I was happy to see that the brand of conservatism is more along the German/Irish Catholic demographic. Of course, there are also many Catholics who are quite liberal, and Catholics generally promote education, the arts and progressive social works. I grew up in a small Catholic town in Wisconsin, so this demographic is familiar to me. Not to mention Cincy is a Jesuit hotbed, and the Jesuits were actually some of the first Western scholars to open up dialogue with China and translate some of our medical texts...
Granted, Roman Catholicism in Cincinnati is still prevalent and strong, and neither its nor the city's German heritage should be minimized. But, as in other large Midwestern cities that were so influenced by this faith and heritage (St. Louis and Milwaukee, etc.), so have other people and cultures entered the picture. Blacks, Appalachians, Jews; all have left their indelible history on Cincinnati. (as, presently, are an increasing number of Hispanics, Indians, and Asians)

For example (as you've already observed), Cincinnati is no Germanic version of yesteryear's Dublin, Ireland. In this city, "The Church" has been fearfully downsized since its heyday in 1950-55. Only in HS football does it still dominate the local landscape. Just as elsewhere in our nation, other voices can now speak with effect and w/o intimidation--and, this includes not only progressive Catholics and Protestants, but also Muslims, Hindus, and Buddhists. It's no secret that traditional Christianity is waning and being transformed into something very different in the First World--and, obviously, this includes Cincinnati--where, today, a "seeker-friendly" mega church in Oakley ("Crossroads") and its pastor (Brian Tome) are wielding a tremendous influence upon other local religious institutions. Needless to say, what happens at Crossroads may not be relevant to a Buddhist/Taoist couple migrating here from the PNW--but, like yourselves in Cincinnati, all of our voices together will radically change this city's future.
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Old 12-08-2012, 08:18 AM
 
77 posts, read 169,529 times
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rhizohm I encourage you check out a couple of
links to these progressive leaning organizations in my neighborhood that might be helpful in your decision making.

Cincinnati Zen Center - Ohio Buddhist Meditation Practice Sangha

http://enrightecovillage.org/
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Old 12-08-2012, 08:59 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati (Norwood)
3,389 posts, read 3,726,855 times
Reputation: 1764
Quote:
Originally Posted by motorman View Post
Is this the same Ohio city that still struggles with its woefully inadequate public transportation system (COTA), a talked about, but non existent BART, and not one inch of LRT going anywhere? (just asking... )
My bad--"BRT." (oh, never mind... )
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Old 12-08-2012, 10:10 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,846,349 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by price hill will View Post
rhizohm I encourage you check out a couple of
links to these progressive leaning organizations in my neighborhood that might be helpful in your decision making.

Cincinnati Zen Center - Ohio Buddhist Meditation Practice Sangha

http://enrightecovillage.org/
Cool! Thanks for the links. I am not in Price Hill that often, and hardly ever hang out there. Good to learn more about the west side.
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Old 12-08-2012, 11:42 AM
 
Location: Phoenix
1,277 posts, read 4,076,644 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natural510 View Post
Columbus is probably the only Ohio city which would welcome something along those lines. The rest are too stodgy and old-school, even Cleveland with its blue-collar Democrat demographic. Yellow Springs is the "Berkeley" of the state, but it's a small village and not an option if you crave urban living.
This really is true.

Columbus' central city fits the op's desires best. Neighborhoods like Clintonville and Grandview would be perfect for them.

But I do think Cincinnati has urban neighborhoods that will be liveable for the OP. I just don't think the mindset of the metro and general populace is going to be as good as a fit as progressive minded metro columbus.

On the smaller town idea: I think it's nice to visit places like Springfield. But living there? Too small. Coming from Portland I don't think the OP would find that active enough.

I'd prefer to find that mindset, in Cincinnati, in specific neighborhoods. Or I recommend going to Columbus where they OP will find what they are looking for, for sure.
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Old 12-08-2012, 12:04 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,846,349 times
Reputation: 924
Quote:
Originally Posted by rhizohm View Post
Now my fiance & business partner and I are thinking of moving to Cincinnati at the encouragement of her family, who is connected to the medical and business community there.
I don't understand why so many of you are recommending other cities, when the OP made it extremely obvious why they were moving to Cincinnati in their initial post. Some of you who live here should be talking up Cincinnati instead of showing how little you know about the city itself, because obviously you never set foot in the city and stay out in the ultra conservative burbs.

My two cents: If you don't really know, then you have nothing to offer that is relevant to the OP's desires. And Columbus boosters need to head back over to their own forums before this entire thread turns into another Cincy vs. Columbus thread. And why would someone moving to Cincy to be close to family move to another city that is two hours away? Uhh...yeah.

Myself and others who actually spend the vast majority of their time in Cincinnati proper are in the know and have pointed the OP in the right direction to get started on their future in Cincinnati. If you can't contribute to that, then you are just trying to drag this tread off topic. Exiting soapbox now.
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Old 12-08-2012, 12:43 PM
 
2,886 posts, read 3,970,784 times
Reputation: 1499
I think it is a mistake to assume that the value of experiences and opinions of people posting on this thread is so heavily influenced by what neighborhood the individuals live in. Some of us have occasion to travel all around the area and meet a broad range of people. At least, I know I do--it's because of the work I do, and because my retired husband has really enjoyed exploring and learning as much as he can about Cincinnati's varied neighborhoods and people. Of course, no one can know everything and everyone is influenced by the personal lens they experience the community through. I clearly realize, for example, that the OP is not in my age group or even my generation. None of this though, means that my perceptions are necessarily uninformed, wrong, or of any less value than anyone else's.
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