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Old 12-14-2012, 04:29 PM
 
6,313 posts, read 13,234,390 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TomJones123 View Post
Ok, went out to Blue Ash Chili last Thursday. I gotta say, and the Mrs. agrees, that it's hands down the best chili around. And not to mention we both had six ways. Those jalapeño fried poppers added another dimension. It was awesome!
Agreed. I was there a few months ago. Even better than the place I adore in Chicago.
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Old 12-14-2012, 05:32 PM
 
Location: Mason, OH
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Originally Posted by Peter1948 View Post
Agreed. I was there a few months ago. Even better than the place I adore in Chicago.
I have had Cincinnati Chili outside of Washington D.C. in Herndon Virginia, yes brought there by a transplant. But I have never had anything close to Cincinnati Chili anywhere near Chicago. Are you kidding me?
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Old 12-14-2012, 05:45 PM
 
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Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
I have had Cincinnati Chili outside of Washington D.C. in Herndon Virginia, yes brought there by a transplant. But I have never had anything close to Cincinnati Chili anywhere near Chicago. Are you kidding me?
Nope. There is a spot It is not true Cincinnati style chili (more like 3 way or 5 way without noodles I guess). You have to ask for the noodles. But it is DAMN good. It's my secret space. Don't want the hipsters to found out where it is and take over the joint. Don't forget Chicago is massive compared to Cincy. I haven't even been to half of all the restaurants in the city alone that are highly rated and I am up there all the time for work.
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Old 12-14-2012, 06:15 PM
 
Location: Mason, OH
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Originally Posted by Peter1948 View Post
Nope. There is a spot It is not true Cincinnati style chili (more like 3 way or 5 way without noodles I guess). You have to ask for the noodles. But it is DAMN good. It's my secret space. Don't want the hipsters to found out where it is and take over the joint. Don't forget Chicago is massive compared to Cincy. I haven't even been to half of all the restaurants in the city alone that are highly rated and I am up there all the time for work.
I understand Chicago is much larger than Cincinnati. I also understand there are hundreds of variations of chili. But to say the version you have there is sans noodles is my first clue. Whatever it is, it is not Cincinnati Chili. BTW my definition of a noodle is a flat sided pasta. Spaghetti is round. Now Japanese noodles are round, but they are also made out of rice.

My favorite restaurant in downtown Chicago, in the Loop area, was George Diamonds Steakhouse. They had some other locations in Chicago, but we liked the Loop. It was very large and they cooked the steaks on rotisserie styled indoor charcoal grills. They did not take reservations, they did not have to. Their lounge/bar waiting area in the front was always jammed. It is one of the first places which comes to my mind recalling Chicago of some 50 years ago. My least favorite Chicago restaurant was Lawry's Prime Rib, always felt like you were being put through a cattle car. Yes, Chicago has a good number of restaurants, but percentage wise I do not feel that superior to Cincinnati.

And Cincinnati Chili is Cincinnati, pure and simple. The Greek families who immigrated here and were likely all interrelated covered Cincinnati with their imported chili, meat sauce, whatever you want to call it, but it is unique to Cincinnati. We will not permit Chicago to claim any portion of it.
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Old 12-16-2012, 02:30 AM
 
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Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
I understand Chicago is much larger than Cincinnati. I also understand there are hundreds of variations of chili. But to say the version you have there is sans noodles is my first clue. Whatever it is, it is not Cincinnati Chili. BTW my definition of a noodle is a flat sided pasta. Spaghetti is round. Now Japanese noodles are round, but they are also made out of rice.

My favorite restaurant in downtown Chicago, in the Loop area, was George Diamonds Steakhouse. They had some other locations in Chicago, but we liked the Loop. It was very large and they cooked the steaks on rotisserie styled indoor charcoal grills. They did not take reservations, they did not have to. Their lounge/bar waiting area in the front was always jammed. It is one of the first places which comes to my mind recalling Chicago of some 50 years ago. My least favorite Chicago restaurant was Lawry's Prime Rib, always felt like you were being put through a cattle car. Yes, Chicago has a good number of restaurants, but percentage wise I do not feel that superior to Cincinnati.

And Cincinnati Chili is Cincinnati, pure and simple. The Greek families who immigrated here and were likely all interrelated covered Cincinnati with their imported chili, meat sauce, whatever you want to call it, but it is unique to Cincinnati. We will not permit Chicago to claim any portion of it.

Hmmm. I've had it in Chicago. Trust me. Ohio people are strangely defensive about things; it is one of teh reasons I was glad I left. And they used to have Skyline Chili in Louisville when I lived there. I always thought it was odd, the noodles and chili thing. Cincy and Lville the only two place I have seen where this is routine, but I now like my chili with noodles (sometimes). I prefer to make my own though
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Old 12-16-2012, 07:52 AM
 
Location: Mason, OH
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Originally Posted by Peter1948 View Post
Hmmm. I've had it in Chicago. Trust me. Ohio people are strangely defensive about things; it is one of teh reasons I was glad I left. And they used to have Skyline Chili in Louisville when I lived there. I always thought it was odd, the noodles and chili thing. Cincy and Lville the only two place I have seen where this is routine, but I now like my chili with noodles (sometimes). I prefer to make my own though
There are a handful of Skyline restaurants in several surrounding cities, Dayton, Columbus, Cleveland, Indianapolis, Louisville, and parts of Florida undoubtedly to satisfy the Cincinnati snowbirds. They are nowhere near as popular as here, but that is understandable.

As far as Cincinnatians being defensive, yes for things we believe if not created here at least elevated to mass popularity here that is correct. It is what lends uniqueness to part of our lives. Cincinnati Chili is one of those food items. Cincinnati Goetta is another.

I do not try and tell people in Texas that Cincinnati Chili tops Southwestern Style Chili as they are so different. I love a good bowl of Tex-Mex chili and often make it using a spice mix imported from Texas called 5-Alarm which I must have contacts in Texas ship to me, as the local stores only carry up to 3-Alarm. I do not attempt to make Tex-Mex chili from ground meat, as that would be sacriligous. It must have chewy chunks of meat in it or you have missed the boat. For my part, I use round steak cut into 1/2" cubes and start from there.

Cincinnati Chili on the other hand uses ground beef and you don't even brown it. You put the raw ground beef into a pot with the spices and water and bring it to a boil. Then you turn it down to a low simmer and cook it forever. One of the attractions for the owners of Cincinnati Chili parlors is that they can keep that chili at serving temperature for days. The longer the chili has been slowly evaporating the liquid the more intense the flavor. As they say in the food industry, an extremely long shelf-life.
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Old 12-16-2012, 09:12 AM
 
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Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
There are a handful of Skyline restaurants in several surrounding cities, Dayton, Columbus, Cleveland, Indianapolis, Louisville, and parts of Florida undoubtedly to satisfy the Cincinnati snowbirds. They are nowhere near as popular as here, but that is understandable.

As far as Cincinnatians being defensive, yes for things we believe if not created here at least elevated to mass popularity here that is correct. It is what lends uniqueness to part of our lives. Cincinnati Chili is one of those food items. Cincinnati Goetta is another.

I do not try and tell people in Texas that Cincinnati Chili tops Southwestern Style Chili as they are so different. I love a good bowl of Tex-Mex chili and often make it using a spice mix imported from Texas called 5-Alarm which I must have contacts in Texas ship to me, as the local stores only carry up to 3-Alarm. I do not attempt to make Tex-Mex chili from ground meat, as that would be sacriligous. It must have chewy chunks of meat in it or you have missed the boat. For my part, I use round steak cut into 1/2" cubes and start from there.

Cincinnati Chili on the other hand uses ground beef and you don't even brown it. You put the raw ground beef into a pot with the spices and water and bring it to a boil. Then you turn it down to a low simmer and cook it forever. One of the attractions for the owners of Cincinnati Chili parlors is that they can keep that chili at serving temperature for days. The longer the chili has been slowly evaporating the liquid the more intense the flavor. As they say in the food industry, an extremely long shelf-life.
Is the serving temp of the chili above the point where bacteria will not grow? Keeping it warm is one thing that could lead to contamination since food borne bacteria thrive in a warm environment. But if it is kept at a rather hot temp which I would guess to be at least 160 degrees would likely not only inhibit bacterial growth but also kill it and keep people from getting sick.
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Old 12-16-2012, 09:20 AM
 
Location: Mason, OH
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Originally Posted by WILWRadio View Post
Is the serving temp of the chili above the point where bacteria will not grow? Keeping it warm is one thing that could lead to contamination since food borne bacteria thrive in a warm environment. But if it is kept at a rather hot temp which I would guess to be at least 160 degrees would likely not only inhibit bacterial growth but also kill it and keep people from getting sick.
For the number of decades Cincinnati Chili has been served in parlors all over this city, I have not heard of an outbreak of food sickness from it. I am not sure what temperature it is maintained at in the restaurants, but ours at home never lasts that long anyways.
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Old 12-16-2012, 10:01 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati (Norwood)
3,386 posts, read 3,719,591 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post

...As far as Cincinnatians being defensive, yes for things we believe if not created here at least elevated to mass popularity here that is correct. It is what lends uniqueness to part of our lives. Cincinnati Chili is one of those food items. Cincinnati Goetta is another.

Cincinnati Chili on the other hand uses ground beef and you don't even brown it. You put the raw ground beef into a pot with the spices and water and bring it to a boil. Then you turn it down to a low simmer and cook it forever. One of the attractions for the owners of Cincinnati Chili parlors is that they can keep that chili at serving temperature for days. The longer the chili has been slowly evaporating the liquid the more intense the flavor. As they say in the food industry, an extremely long shelf-life.
Naturally, local food industry superstars Skyline and Gold Star, having gained recognition for their Cincinnati Chili, boast that their recipes must remain their closely guarded secrets. However, for those of you who are willing to invest in top-quality spices (Penzeys Spices in Hyde Park Plaza is one excellent source) and some detailed reading, I recommend that you turn to "Cook's Illustrated" for a professional expose of how to make this beloved dish. Any foodie knows the extent to which Christopher Kimball's Cook's Illustrated staff goes to authentically recreate recipes--and their research into what makes Cincinnati Chili a unique and exceptional chili will answer most of your questions.

Years ago, after loving Skyline Chili to death but having little idea how to make it, my wife and I discovered a detailed recipe in one of Cook's Illustrated's many books--this one being "Steaks, Chops, Roasts, and Ribs." And, thereafter, we have never looked back--it's the real deal! No doubt, the exact same discussion of this chili is available both through other Cook's Illustrated publications and its website (of which you must be a member to access), but once again may I encourage you to give Cincinnati Chili a trial run the "Christopher Kimball Way."
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Old 12-16-2012, 10:23 AM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,412,053 times
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Unfortunately, if you are citing Christopher Kimball as the know it all of American Cuisine, I will run the other direction. He has somehow managed to get the PBS networks to carry his shows. And all of his published cookbooks. My wife has recently bought several, and I have yet to have a decent recipe from any of them. Do they actually test any of the recipes? Sorry, I am far less than a fan.
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