U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Ohio > Cincinnati
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-08-2013, 07:34 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,844,393 times
Reputation: 924

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by restorationconsultant View Post
Cincinnati DESERVES a real preservation organization that understands that a small cottage is just as important as a grand mansion and both deserve to be saved.
Couldn't agree more. Who is funding the efforts?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-08-2013, 09:33 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
477 posts, read 531,643 times
Reputation: 275
Something else I found that's relevant, particularly note that people still can design buildings that look permanent, unlike the garbage that is continuously spewed out by Cincy or Indy design firms for infill: The newest thing in architecture: Something old - CBS News
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-08-2013, 10:12 PM
 
Location: Indianapolis and Cincinnati
682 posts, read 1,391,980 times
Reputation: 610
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomJones123 View Post
Couldn't agree more. Who is funding the efforts?
Funding will be from corporate people and local corporate concerns,preservationists, and grass roots funding with a revolving fund program based on acquiring property (several donated propertries in the pipeline) that will be stabilized and resold with protective covenants (much like Knox Hill's save not raze program , or Indiana Landmarks FLIP program). There are a lot of people who are frustrated by the "elitist nature' of CPA who think we need to start saving something other than mansions. Money is not an issue. Getting a qualified staff and legal team to fight the big fights are. BUT its doable.

In other words, community based preservation. Saving things that would be demoed by the city, that actually represent our historical built environment. Most importantly educating the city that stabilization of existing assets makes more sensse that blindly demoing them. We need certain code changes that make demo more difficult (costly) too, and we need to find a way to incentivize reinvestment ( like raising the 10 yr historic tax abatement from 250 to 500K in order to do larger properties). We need an ordinance change to use CDBG funding to stabilize properties not in designated historic districts and above all, we NEED a new urban conservator who isn't 'rubber stamping' properties as non historic eligible when they really are.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-08-2013, 10:28 PM
 
Location: Over-the-Rhine, Ohio
548 posts, read 612,583 times
Reputation: 643
THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU!!! This is EXACTLY what this city needs. Any way we can help?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-08-2013, 10:44 PM
 
Location: Indianapolis and Cincinnati
682 posts, read 1,391,980 times
Reputation: 610
Quote:
Originally Posted by neilworms2 View Post
Something else I found that's relevant, particularly note that people still can design buildings that look permanent, unlike the garbage that is continuously spewed out by Cincy or Indy design firms for infill: The newest thing in architecture: Something old - CBS News

You know so much of my business is reintoducing architectural style back into 'new urbanist' lofts. People buy this stuff, in thier mid 20s, live in it a few years and their style 'evolves' beyond IKEA and they realize that mantles, stained glass and walls make sense. That "elegance" has a purpose and is a statement about how one learns to appreciate real style.

I have predicted that a large part of my business in Cincy will be 'combing small lofts back into one larger grander space, reintroducing historical style back in to apces. 3CDC is building "crap" at 300 a sq ft that most people will soon realize need a 'style infusion". A good example is to look at the new infill being built in Cjicago and Washington DC. the best stuff is all historic evocative architecture with real woodwork real mantles and historic style.

Cincinnati, again, is 10 years behind the times.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-09-2013, 12:39 AM
 
800 posts, read 700,997 times
Reputation: 552
People are buying condos in OTR because of the location, not because of the build quality of the units, which is quite low in the units priced below $200,000. In the case of U Square, the developer is getting away with throwing up crap and renting it out for $800/head without a parking space because of location.

The cities with higher quality new buildings have it because developable land is much more limited and there is less need for on-site parking. This means two things:

1. With higher land prices custom design and finishes become a smaller percentage of the total project cost
2. Small parking lots/garages or zero parking whatsoever greatly reduces the project cost and increases rentable space.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-09-2013, 07:33 AM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
477 posts, read 531,643 times
Reputation: 275
Jake, do you happen to know what Columbus' parking requirements are?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-09-2013, 08:43 AM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,416,907 times
Reputation: 1920
I don't know which is worse, newer student housing looking like a HUD low income development or the past when slumlords just milked rundown properties for student rentals.

I remember one incident when my son was at UC. He commuted but of course had many friends around campus. One weekend they gathered at one of these slumlord places. There were more students living there than any reasonable inspection should have ever permitted. They were gathered on a 2nd floor deck, with the grill making burgers and drinking their beer. Many of them were Engineering students but had not yet acquired the knowledge to declare this is unsafe. This is not untypical of college students. Their years of wisdom come later.

Suddenly the structure separates from the building. Two things were fortunate. First, the deck moved like a parallelogram on top of the collapsing lower supports. Second, there was a lawn space in the direction of movement, not some solid structure. So they all ended up tumbling onto the grass, no serious injuries, thankful for that.

Upon hearing of the incident, I of course screamed at my son when his brain was going to go into gear. Perhaps not diplomatic, but I believe a normal father's reaction.

I made a fatal mistake then. I said these places can kill you. You and your buddies are welcome here. For the next two years, every school section on Sunday morning we had a large number of college kids overnighting in our basement. Yes I call it a basement, but at least it was carpeted. Yes, we were a major breakfast producing establishment, thanks to the efforts of my wife.

If this is something you can do for your family, you do it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-09-2013, 09:45 AM
 
Location: Indianapolis and Cincinnati
682 posts, read 1,391,980 times
Reputation: 610
Quote:
Originally Posted by ProkNo5 View Post
THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU!!! This is EXACTLY what this city needs. Any way we can help?
We are putting together a steering committee as a first step of putting together a non profit. We are looking for people who have an interest in preservation who are community connected.

This phase is largely about establishing what the real needs are and which needs are not being met by CPA and focusing on those areas.

Some of the steering committee will likely be asked to be on the board. Of course estalishing teh funding aspects are important and we are encouraging local corporate participation. We are thinking about an adopt a house project, where corporations might 'sponsor' a house and perhaps do some volunteer work, like cleaning up the lot , helping to remove vinyl siding , that sort of thing. Much like adopt a median where corporations or community groups take on aspects of maintenance.

So we are at the early stages and welcoming input because we feel that preservation is a community activity as it directly impacts neighborhoods.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-09-2013, 10:07 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,844,393 times
Reputation: 924
Quote:
Originally Posted by restorationconsultant View Post
Funding will be from corporate people and local corporate concerns,preservationists, and grass roots funding with a revolving fund program based on acquiring property (several donated propertries in the pipeline) that will be stabilized and resold with protective covenants (much like Knox Hill's save not raze program , or Indiana Landmarks FLIP program). There are a lot of people who are frustrated by the "elitist nature' of CPA who think we need to start saving something other than mansions. Money is not an issue. Getting a qualified staff and legal team to fight the big fights are. BUT its doable.

In other words, community based preservation. Saving things that would be demoed by the city, that actually represent our historical built environment. Most importantly educating the city that stabilization of existing assets makes more sensse that blindly demoing them. We need certain code changes that make demo more difficult (costly) too, and we need to find a way to incentivize reinvestment ( like raising the 10 yr historic tax abatement from 250 to 500K in order to do larger properties). We need an ordinance change to use CDBG funding to stabilize properties not in designated historic districts and above all, we NEED a new urban conservator who isn't 'rubber stamping' properties as non historic eligible when they really are.
Thanks for the details. Please post links when you have them, I would like to be learn more and track the results. This is very exciting!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Ohio > Cincinnati
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top