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Old 01-12-2013, 07:21 PM
 
Location: A voice of truth, shouted down by fools.
1,086 posts, read 2,231,035 times
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^ I've been to Oleg's Tavern. Even though prices were reasonable, I won't go back. The food was bland and yuck, and the owner is quite intimidating.
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Old 01-12-2013, 10:46 PM
 
Location: Cambridge, MA
4,730 posts, read 10,987,068 times
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The bar inside was sparkling clean when I treated a friend to a yummy schnitzel dinner there, back in '09. It was brightly but not blindingly lit, from trendy recessed bulbs in the ceiling and mercifully not by those dang lil' hanging cutesy lamps that get in your way. On that occasion as well as subsequent ones the space was otherwise devoid of clientele while merriment in abundance could be heard outside.
The beer garden is strictly no-frills, plastic tables and chairs on blacktop and an un-fancy bar. Any "grunginess" probably occurred on a busy night. It doesn't take long for carelessly discarded plastic cups and paper napkins to lend a trashed effect to the ground. The staffers are too busy making runs to the kitchen or opening kegs to keep up with sweeping.
VERY cool to know that there will be a re-opening of some kind next month. Just in time to get ready for March Madness crowds!
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Old 01-12-2013, 11:04 PM
 
Location: OH
688 posts, read 868,222 times
Reputation: 364
Quote:
Originally Posted by goyguy View Post
The bar inside was sparkling clean when I treated a friend to a yummy schnitzel dinner there, back in '09. It was brightly but not blindingly lit, from trendy recessed bulbs in the ceiling and mercifully not by those dang lil' hanging cutesy lamps that get in your way. On that occasion as well as subsequent ones the space was otherwise devoid of clientele while merriment in abundance could be heard outside.
The beer garden is strictly no-frills, plastic tables and chairs on blacktop and an un-fancy bar. Any "grunginess" probably occurred on a busy night. It doesn't take long for carelessly discarded plastic cups and paper napkins to lend a trashed effect to the ground. The staffers are too busy making runs to the kitchen or opening kegs to keep up with sweeping.
VERY cool to know that there will be a re-opening of some kind next month. Just in time to get ready for March Madness crowds!
What establishment are you discussing? Christy's has wooden picnic tables and stone tables with stone benches in the biergarten. There's nothing made of plastic other than the beer cups, pitchers, food trays, and napkin holders that I've ever seen and the ground is gravel not blacktop.
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Old 01-12-2013, 11:28 PM
 
Location: Cambridge, MA
4,730 posts, read 10,987,068 times
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No-frills in '11 was probably no-frills in '12, but I happily stand corrected if such is the case. Fine points aside, disposables are casually flung aside freely by many people out partying, and somebody happening to pass on a busy night might leap to the conclusion that the spot is shabby all the time. Seems silly to state the obvious, but the subject of Christy's being "rundown" was raised and all I was offering was my take. Whether gravel "crunches," or beer-soaked tar sticks, underfoot on the property is irrelevant.
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Old 01-13-2013, 09:43 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,846,349 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goyguy View Post
No-frills in '11 was probably no-frills in '12, but I happily stand corrected if such is the case. Fine points aside, disposables are casually flung aside freely by many people out partying, and somebody happening to pass on a busy night might leap to the conclusion that the spot is shabby all the time. Seems silly to state the obvious, but the subject of Christy's being "rundown" was raised and all I was offering was my take. Whether gravel "crunches," or beer-soaked tar sticks, underfoot on the property is irrelevant.
Christy's is not run down. I agree with your take.
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Old 01-13-2013, 11:30 AM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,422,740 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by t45209 View Post
I disagree with this. Yes, a lot of German food can be hearty and rich, but frankly, there is much more variety than most Americans can appreciate. German restaurants in the US serve what you expect: sausages, sauerbraten, and schnitzel, and very often not well executed. Go to Germany and you find a surprising diversity of foods. In the Viktualienmarkt in Munich (their answer to Findlay Market) you will find some of the most amazing seafood stands and impeccable vegetables. In the North Sea regions, they eat tons of seafood, and not just pickled herring. Chicken is a staple on German menus, and yet it can be darn hard to find potato pancakes in a Bavarian restaurant. We Americans think that's all they eat.

In the south of Germany you'll find a lot of Italian influence in cooking, and in Berlin you're lucky to find "German" food at all...it's a European cuisine all its own.

You do allude to one of the problems with good German cooking...the recipes are hard and can involve many steps to get it really right. Sauerbraten, for example, can take days to prepare, if done authentically. And very often, a dish like blaukraut (red cabbage) if not done right is watery and has an unpleasant color. Very few US German restaurants really put the effort in that's necessary.
And I disagree with you. There may be some variety in German cuisine, but not to the degree you indicate. In my several trips to Hamburg, a northern seaport, there was good seafood available, but at a very expensive price and certainly not a staple of the average person's diet. When I wandered down the streets of the city, fast food places galore all put forward Kartoffel - potatoes in one form of the other. Since I like potatoes, especially if dolled up, I was fine. But to call it a diverse cuisine no, at least 80% of the street-side restaurants offered Kartoffel.

They did have some nice pizza. But let's face it, pizza is a cheaply made food. If you have the ability to through together a decent crust and some sauce you can make a pizza. I did like the pizza, but probably more so since everyplace had some good draft beer to throw it down with.

But let's start out the day with breakfast. I don't think I ever had a decent breakfast in Germany. A hard crusted roll, a hunk if hard cheese, and a hunk of hard salami - that was breakfast. And you had to choke it down since they apparently thought the juice or coffee was ladened with gold.

Like anyplace else in the world, if you have enough money to spend you can be very well fed in Germany. But don't fool yourself into thinking this is the everyday meal of the average German.

My daughter and son-in-law were stationed in Germany for awhile. The military base was kind of in Timbuktu as they end to be. My daughter did like the fact she could walk from the base into the small town and visit all of the independent shops in once sweep. And yes fresh baked bread, fresh produce, fresh meat were something she enjoyed. But I never heard her exclaim even once Dad this is so much better than what we have in the US.
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Old 01-13-2013, 02:52 PM
 
Location: OH
688 posts, read 868,222 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goyguy View Post
No-frills in '11 was probably no-frills in '12, but I happily stand corrected if such is the case. Fine points aside, disposables are casually flung aside freely by many people out partying, and somebody happening to pass on a busy night might leap to the conclusion that the spot is shabby all the time. Seems silly to state the obvious, but the subject of Christy's being "rundown" was raised and all I was offering was my take. Whether gravel "crunches," or beer-soaked tar sticks, underfoot on the property is irrelevant.
I'm not arguing it's an upscale establishment. I'm genuinely perplexed by your description and it has me wondering if you didn't visit a different "Chrity's" than the one we're all discussing. I worked there some ten years ago and the decor didn't fit the description you provided. Again, the interior is old world hexagonal tile in the front room bar and hardwood floors or carpet in the three dining rooms. The Rathskeller is a basement with stone walls, drop tile ceilings, conrete floors in the bar area and carpet floors in the pool table / gaming room. The biergarten is concrete under cover and gravel where it is uncovered with a wooden bar with a copper top inlay. Wooden picnic tables and stone benches and tables comprise the outdoor furniture as shown in the link below.

Christy's and Lenhardts

I was there before a Bearcats football game in October and the decor was the same as described above. It's a campus establishment so it feels the effects of transitory college kids who give little thought for their effect on their surrounding and besides that it's over a century old. No one would mistake it for a new build out in Mason or West Chester but my point is your first description is not describing Christy's in Clifton at least since the year 2000.
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Old 01-13-2013, 04:39 PM
 
1,130 posts, read 2,033,139 times
Reputation: 700
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
And I disagree with you. There may be some variety in German cuisine, but not to the degree you indicate. In my several trips to Hamburg, a northern seaport, there was good seafood available, but at a very expensive price and certainly not a staple of the average person's diet. When I wandered down the streets of the city, fast food places galore all put forward Kartoffel - potatoes in one form of the other. Since I like potatoes, especially if dolled up, I was fine. But to call it a diverse cuisine no, at least 80% of the street-side restaurants offered Kartoffel.

They did have some nice pizza. But let's face it, pizza is a cheaply made food. If you have the ability to through together a decent crust and some sauce you can make a pizza. I did like the pizza, but probably more so since everyplace had some good draft beer to throw it down with.

But let's start out the day with breakfast. I don't think I ever had a decent breakfast in Germany. A hard crusted roll, a hunk if hard cheese, and a hunk of hard salami - that was breakfast. And you had to choke it down since they apparently thought the juice or coffee was ladened with gold.

Like anyplace else in the world, if you have enough money to spend you can be very well fed in Germany. But don't fool yourself into thinking this is the everyday meal of the average German.

My daughter and son-in-law were stationed in Germany for awhile. The military base was kind of in Timbuktu as they end to be. My daughter did like the fact she could walk from the base into the small town and visit all of the independent shops in once sweep. And yes fresh baked bread, fresh produce, fresh meat were something she enjoyed. But I never heard her exclaim even once Dad this is so much better than what we have in the US.
I have to say your experience was decidedly different from mine, and we didn't have to go out our way to find it, nor did we have to spend a lot of money to get it. And I sure ate a lot better at breakfast than you did. True, the brotchen is a staple for German breakfast, but I've had plenty of occasions with fresh fruits, eggs, sausages, selections of cheeses, and so on. I was in one hotel in Partenkirche that had a breakfast buffet so big and with so many selections that it was impossible to try everything. I also remember a place that served the most delicious fruit juice with breakfast. I don't know what was in it, but it was something they blended themselves.

And when I said Italian, pizza wasn't even on my mind. I went to a great seafood restaurant on a lake outside of Fussen once, and the menu was full of tasty options that had an Italian flair.

Also, my point about food in Germany being better than here was specific to German restaurants in the US. I wouldn't begin to argue that overall food is better in Germany. Heck, I like a good steak every now and again, and you couldn't find medium rare porterhouse to save your life in that country. I've known Germans to come here and that's all they want to eat.

If you want to talk bad breakfast, I spent two weeks in the UK and I got so tired of baked beans, tomatoes, nasty little sausages, eggs, and white toast, that I turned to Kellogg's Corn Flakes for break. And guess what, even the Corn Flakes over there are bad. And what's up with Wheatabix? ugh.
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Old 02-07-2013, 07:16 PM
 
1,130 posts, read 2,033,139 times
Reputation: 700
Seems that the battle over the Goetz House is just getting started:

Proposed student housing development would raise Lenhardt's building

Seems Channel 9 uses the same editors as the Enquirer and can't tell the difference between raise and raze.
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Old 02-07-2013, 08:28 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
31,390 posts, read 57,623,106 times
Reputation: 52248
Quote:
Originally Posted by t45209 View Post
Seems that the battle over the Goetz House is just getting started:
Damn developers. No doubt the plan is for some cookie-cutter building seen in every other city in the U.S.

Quote:
Seems Channel 9 uses the same editors as the Enquirer and can't tell the difference between raise and raze.
Now it reads "demolish"; at least they were asleep at the switch for only a short time. The Enquirer rarely corrects its mistakes.
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