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Old 01-11-2013, 08:25 AM
 
Location: "Daytonnati"
4,245 posts, read 5,756,939 times
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This thread took an interesting turn as I was expecting the history of Reading Road as a pioneer/19th century route out of Cincy to SW Ohio....not how a part of it turned into a ghetto.

Historic Reading Road as a route out of Cincy could be a good topic? But maybe too historical?
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Old 01-11-2013, 08:56 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dayton Sux View Post
This thread took an interesting turn as I was expecting the history of Reading Road as a pioneer/19th century route out of Cincy to SW Ohio....not how a part of it turned into a ghetto.

Historic Reading Road as a route out of Cincy could be a good topic? But maybe too historical?
I dunno, I would enjoy it. I am all to familiar with Avondale. I have a friend who is a bass player that lives on Rockdale. One can readily see that it used to be a very upscale neighborhood that has fallen into blight and poverty. Therefore, talking about and repeating the obvious is boring to an extent.

Personally, I get tired of the same old arguments and discussions. I am not sure that some posters here actually want ideas and debate, but a platform to shout out their grievances.
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Old 01-11-2013, 09:05 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
31,223 posts, read 57,377,537 times
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Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
At the same time, when I see what were solid neighborhoods I had family members living in and visited frequently as a youth, such as Price Hill, Westwood, College Hill, Mt Airy literally going to pot due to sleaze-bag slum-lords taking advantage of Section 8 housing it makes the hair on the back of my neck crawl. My conclusion is the City is revitalizing downtown and at the same time spreading blight over a much larger area. Where is the gain in that? And the fact is most are still within the City, so they are still a problem to the City. The drops in property values and taxes, effects on the schools, just about everything in daily life is being affected, including neighborhood safety, etc.
This has long been my question about revitalization, gentrification, and all those other "ations" as well.

Another contributing factor in the decline of the city's neighborhoods was the construction of Fort Washington Way and, later, Riverfront Stadium. The folks living in the Bottoms had to go somewhere. So they went to Avondale, and to Madisonville, and Westwood and Evanston and Price Hill. Did the city not see its neighborhoods declining?

I don't think low-income folks are being pushed out of their homes at the same rate as they were in the 50s, 60s and 70s, but it's still happening, and not just to people in substandard housing. In Oakley, a street full of two-bedroom bungalows were replaced with three times as many three-story condos, and then there's the tragedy of eminent domain in Norwood. Heck, look at Mariemont: Get rid of all those little old ladies and their Social Security checks living in those one-bedroom apartments on Madisonville Road, in a town they'd lived in their entire lives, and plug in a bunch of $500K condos!
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Old 01-11-2013, 09:21 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,832,929 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
At the same time, when I see what were solid neighborhoods I had family members living in and visited frequently as a youth, such as Price Hill, Westwood, College Hill, Mt Airy literally going to pot due to sleaze-bag slum-lords taking advantage of Section 8 housing it makes the hair on the back of my neck crawl. My conclusion is the City is revitalizing downtown and at the same time spreading blight over a much larger area.
I would say that you may have come to a partially incorrect conclusion. The biggest factor in these neighborhoods gaining a lot of section 8 is from the foreclosure crisis. Once these homes are foreclosed on they are usually sold very cheap. It gives slum lords incentive to snap them up, make minor modifications to meet section 8 requirements, and move folks in. There are good section 8 people out there that have gained a bad reputation from the few who cause the problems. I am not sure what the city of Cincinnati is supposed to do about that.

A couple years ago I shopped homes in East and West Price Hill. I was amazed at how many homes that were for sale were foreclosures. I was also shocked to see how cheap the majority of them were selling for. I was very disappointed when I drove to Cincinnati from Dayton to shop homes there and saw first hand what the neighborhoods were like.

I can tell you this much, there is not much displacement going on in OTR any more. The vast majority of the redevelopment there is on vacant properties. There is also still a lot of section 8 in OTR, and a lot of these building will stay that way.
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Old 01-11-2013, 10:31 AM
 
2,886 posts, read 3,956,094 times
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Originally Posted by TomJones123 View Post
I would say that you may have come to a partially incorrect conclusion. The biggest factor in these neighborhoods gaining a lot of section 8 is from the foreclosure crisis. Once these homes are foreclosed on they are usually sold very cheap. It gives slum lords incentive to snap them up, make minor modifications to meet section 8 requirements, and move folks in. There are good section 8 people out there that have gained a bad reputation from the few who cause the problems. I am not sure what the city of Cincinnati is supposed to do about that.

A couple years ago I shopped homes in East and West Price Hill. I was amazed at how many homes that were for sale were foreclosures. I was also shocked to see how cheap the majority of them were selling for. I was very disappointed when I drove to Cincinnati from Dayton to shop homes there and saw first hand what the neighborhoods were like.

I can tell you this much, there is not much displacement going on in OTR any more. The vast majority of the redevelopment there is on vacant properties. There is also still a lot of section 8 in OTR, and a lot of these building will stay that way.
I would say that you may have come to a partially incorrect conclusion. The Section 8 issues in the neighborhoods mentioned predate the foreclosure crisis by at least a decade. I realize you are a relative newcomer to the area, which might account for your being misinformed.

That said, foreclosures have likely hastened the process. And that said, I also agree 100 percent that not all Section 8 tenants are problem tenants. Having large apartment complexes go to Section 8, though, is distinctly a strain on the affected neighborhoods.
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Old 01-11-2013, 11:01 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,832,929 times
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Originally Posted by Sarah Perry View Post
I would say that you may have come to a partially incorrect conclusion. The Section 8 issues in the neighborhoods mentioned predate the foreclosure crisis by at least a decade. I realize you are a relative newcomer to the area, which might account for your being misinformed.
Lol...of course, what would I know?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sarah Perry View Post
That said, foreclosures have likely hastened the process.
Another way of saying what I am getting at. I never denied that section 8 had gained footing in any of the neighborhoods in question. I am simply refuting that redevelopment in OTR is causing mass displacement and bringing down other neighborhoods in the city. Mass migration out of OTR happened a long time ago, and I am sure it impacted neighborhoods that didn't have poor people, because the had to go someplace.

Development in OTR is attracting new residents, not displacing them. In recent years, and I saw it first hand as a newcomer shipping homes, the foreclosure crisis had a major impact on East and West Price Hill. And many homes that were once market priced and housed middle class families were snapped up on the cheap and converted to rental properties, section 8 or otherwise.
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Old 01-11-2013, 11:05 AM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,377,243 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sarah Perry View Post
I would say that you may have come to a partially incorrect conclusion. The Section 8 issues in the neighborhoods mentioned predate the foreclosure crisis by at least a decade. I realize you are a relative newcomer to the area, which might account for your being misinformed.

That said, foreclosures have likely hastened the process. And that said, I also agree 100 percent that not all Section 8 tenants are problem tenants. Having large apartment complexes go to Section 8, though, is distinctly a strain on the affected neighborhoods.
And I don't want to intimate Section 8 is the cause of all the problems. But the fact is the blight is spreading and spreading fast. Very sad to see happening.
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Old 01-11-2013, 11:15 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
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Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
And I don't want to intimate Section 8 is the cause of all the problems. But the fact is the blight is spreading and spreading fast. Very sad to see happening.
And on this we agree. But it's not the city of Cincinnati's fault it's happening.
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Old 01-16-2013, 09:05 AM
 
Location: "Daytonnati"
4,245 posts, read 5,756,939 times
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Historical Reading Road...

...as in the history of the road.

Been doing some reading in this excellent history book of the Centerville/Washington Twp area (suburb of Dayton), and one of the opening chapters is on early roads.

What has this to do with Reading Road???

Becuase Reading Road originally went all the way to Dayton!

Apparently a road survey came to light in the 1970s, dating from the 1790s, that proves this was one of the very first roads north from Cincinnati. It went via a place called Cunninghams Station (a fortified pioneer village..they had these in Kentucky and also in the very early days in SW Ohio due to Indian threats), to Dayton and cut through Washtington Township (which is why it appeared in that local history)

This road was orginally called the Mad River Road, since it went to the mouth of the Mad River, which is in todays downtown Dayton. Apparently the leg in Hamilton County was eventually renamed the Reading Road after Reading town (which had another name at first).

Most of this route has been lost, except that Mad River Road does still exist in Mongtomery County, for a short stretch under that name and for another as Far Hills Avenue, and for another as Byers Road (as you can tell the route is somewhat discontinuous).

The alignment south roughly followed I-75, into the Sharonville area and then Reading, and then on into Cincinnati.

I presume that this right-of-way eventually reverted into farmland in parts, and the Reading Road north of Cincy might have become a turnplike and then was renamed after Reading town.
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Old 01-16-2013, 09:12 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,832,929 times
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Originally Posted by Dayton Sux View Post
Historical Reading Road...

...as in the history of the road.
Thanks for that very cool post!!
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