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Old 01-15-2013, 06:44 AM
 
Location: Over-the-Rhine, Ohio
548 posts, read 607,181 times
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Cincinnati needs more commercials like THIS, broadcast nationally. We've got everything we need here, we just need outsiders to see it.


BrandHUB_Cincinnati - YouTube
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Old 01-15-2013, 06:47 AM
 
5,639 posts, read 8,748,046 times
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Construction quality of homes in this country has declined steadily since the 1950's. Buy a home built prior to the early 1950's and it is likely to be a very well built house. The house I live in presently in rural MO near KC was built in 1925 and it is actually a fairly well built house for these parts. Newer construction is cheaply made and falls apart quickly. Particle board is not match for 3/4 inch plywood or the older clapboard used for the walls of houses. The home I purchased in Covington was also built around 1925 and that thing is built like a tank. Rock solid and better quality than the home here in MO. A decade ago I owned a small colonial built in 1835 in a small town near Beefalo, NY. Aside from a weak floor, it was a decent house and in better shape structurally than many newer homes.
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Old 01-15-2013, 08:14 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati (Norwood)
3,377 posts, read 3,693,454 times
Reputation: 1746
Quote:
Originally Posted by ProkNo5 View Post
Cincinnati needs more commercials like THIS, broadcast nationally. We've got everything we need here, we just need outsiders to see it.


BrandHUB_Cincinnati - YouTube
Thanks for sharing this video, which says much about Cincinnati's business community and CBD environs. (required viewing for anyone who wants a glimpse of a dynamic, unique city with many well-paying jobs within its downtown core)
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Old 01-15-2013, 08:34 AM
 
Location: Beavercreek, OH
2,194 posts, read 3,011,892 times
Reputation: 2334
Quote:
Originally Posted by WILWRadio View Post
Construction quality of homes in this country has declined steadily since the 1950's. Buy a home built prior to the early 1950's and it is likely to be a very well built house. The house I live in presently in rural MO near KC was built in 1925 and it is actually a fairly well built house for these parts. Newer construction is cheaply made and falls apart quickly. Particle board is not match for 3/4 inch plywood or the older clapboard used for the walls of houses. The home I purchased in Covington was also built around 1925 and that thing is built like a tank. Rock solid and better quality than the home here in MO. A decade ago I owned a small colonial built in 1835 in a small town near Beefalo, NY. Aside from a weak floor, it was a decent house and in better shape structurally than many newer homes.
Hi WILWRadio--

I wonder if I should disagree with this assessment because I'm honestly not sure. But it has me thinking because everybody says we don't build things like we used to, and in order to back up that argument we can point out the prefab/cookie cutter houses that have damaged siding after as little as 10 years, things falling apart, holes in the walls, etc. I've certainly seen my share of shoddy construction when driving through subdivisions that aren't that old.

But I'm sure they built terrible houses prior to the 1950's, too - we just don't have any evidence of them because they've all been ripped down, no?

Won't the same happen to the poorly built houses today, and the more well-built ones will last (and then in 2050, we'll complain about how we don't build stuff like we used to, and point to a well-built house of today?)
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Old 01-15-2013, 08:44 AM
 
5,639 posts, read 8,748,046 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hensleya1 View Post
Hi WILWRadio--

I wonder if I should disagree with this assessment because I'm honestly not sure. But it has me thinking because everybody says we don't build things like we used to, and in order to back up that argument we can point out the prefab/cookie cutter houses that have damaged siding after as little as 10 years, things falling apart, holes in the walls, etc. I've certainly seen my share of shoddy construction when driving through subdivisions that aren't that old.

But I'm sure they built terrible houses prior to the 1950's, too - we just don't have any evidence of them because they've all been ripped down, no?

Won't the same happen to the poorly built houses today, and the more well-built ones will last (and then in 2050, we'll complain about how we don't build stuff like we used to, and point to a well-built house of today?)
My cousin Jeff custom builds homes in Connecticut. My younger sister and her husband custom built their own fortress in the late 1980's and that is a well built home. The tract housing I've been in lately is not very well built regardless of the region. Walls crack, foundations shift etc. after just a few years from completion of construction.

A custom built home today is probably still an excellent home but a tract home is not likely to be a very good house. I've yet to be in a truly bad home that was built prior to 1950. Builders started to cut corners in the 1950's and you could tell once you got into a house that it was not solidly built. BTW. My father was in residential sales and home construction.
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Old 01-15-2013, 08:46 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,827,124 times
Reputation: 924
Quote:
Originally Posted by hensleya1 View Post
Hi WILWRadio--

I wonder if I should disagree with this assessment because I'm honestly not sure. But it has me thinking because everybody says we don't build things like we used to, and in order to back up that argument we can point out the prefab/cookie cutter houses that have damaged siding after as little as 10 years, things falling apart, holes in the walls, etc.
Working as a frame and trim carpenter over the years I can say first hand that the vast majority of modern construction is all about speed. Materials have become cheap and workmanship pressed into a race to the finish line. I spent several years doing true custom framing. The company I was with worked for a very exclusive crowd of very rich clients. They worked with the architects to design true custom homes. It was not uncommon for us to spend up to six months framing their mansions. Outside of efforts such as this you will be hard pressed to find quality construction in today's newly made homes.

I think purchasing power of the dollar is the biggest reason for this. It's been devalued so much over the last hundred years that it has affected this market particularly hard.
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Old 01-15-2013, 09:11 AM
 
5,639 posts, read 8,748,046 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TomJones123 View Post
Working as a frame and trim carpenter over the years I can say first hand that the vast majority of modern construction is all about speed. Materials have become cheap and workmanship pressed into a race to the finish line. I spent several years doing true custom framing. The company I was with worked for a very exclusive crowd of very rich clients. They worked with the architects to design true custom homes. It was not uncommon for us to spend up to six months framing their mansions. Outside of efforts such as this you will be hard pressed to find quality construction in today's newly made homes.

I think purchasing power of the dollar is the biggest reason for this. It's been devalued so much over the last hundred years that it has affected this market particularly hard.
Exactly. I think it took two years to build the home that my younger sister and husband now have. It is built to withstand a direct hit from an F3 Tornado or hurricane with 130 mph winds.
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Old 01-15-2013, 09:20 AM
 
Location: "Daytonnati"
4,245 posts, read 5,747,512 times
Reputation: 2953
The first wave of postwar suburbia, say 1950-1960, is pusing 63 years old at the oldest, so we should be seeing some life cycle issues with basic structural systems, as in the sheathing and framing?

I'd figure by now the roofs have been replaced and maybe the windows/doors and the interiors, too, to some extent..
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Old 01-15-2013, 09:20 AM
 
Location: Beavercreek, OH
2,194 posts, read 3,011,892 times
Reputation: 2334
Quote:
Originally Posted by WILWRadio View Post
Exactly. I think it took two years to build the home that my younger sister and husband now have. It is built to withstand a direct hit from an F3 Tornado or hurricane with 130 mph winds.
Hi WILWRadio--

This is just out of sheer curiosity (and I'm contributing to my share of thread drift here), but what kind of cost is one looking at when seeking to have one of these "custom built" homes compared to buying a tract house in a subdivision?
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Old 01-15-2013, 09:27 AM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,358,349 times
Reputation: 1919
Quote:
Originally Posted by hensleya1 View Post
Hi WILWRadio--

This is just out of sheer curiosity (and I'm contributing to my share of thread drift here), but what kind of cost is one looking at when seeking to have one of these "custom built" homes compared to buying a tract house in a subdivision?
Very simple bookoo bucks.
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