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Old 01-14-2013, 02:49 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
477 posts, read 529,700 times
Reputation: 275

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Quite simply, Cincinnati is NOT NYC or San Francisco. So for what someone may pay $1 million dollars for in one of those two cities they will pass up here, simply because they do not want to live in Cincinnati.

Oh that tears me up horribly. Someone wants to tear down Cincinnati for living in NYC. Why should I GAD about that? Yes, Give a Damn about it!

We have one of the greatest cities in the country to grow up in, raise a family, and hopefully retire here.
I've said this before and your just proving it Kjbrill: Cincinnati is Boston striving to be Indianapolis it should be Boston, old historic place with rich history and culture to match, not Indianapolis, good place to raise a family that is a typical Midwestern city. Cincinnati is anything but typical.
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Old 01-14-2013, 02:55 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,827,124 times
Reputation: 924
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
Just a small inquiry fellows. After you are dead and gone, who is going to give a damn about the properties you are renovating? Do you have a lineage set up who will maintain the property you have so meticulously conserved?
And what you don't get about preservation on a large scale, like in OTR, is the neighborhoods stabilize and eventually start growing again into desirable neighborhoods that can command market rate prices. You act like we are all snapping up derelict properties in abandoned neighborhoods in hopes of making a change.

On a side note, I drove down Republic Street today and was pleasantly surprised to see at least half a dozen land banked buildings under construction. Lot of momentum going on between Elm and Vine Streets right now.
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Old 01-14-2013, 03:26 PM
 
Location: Indianapolis and Cincinnati
682 posts, read 1,387,817 times
Reputation: 609
KjBill here is most interesting point about Cincinnati trying to be Indianapolis.

Indianapolis is hosting the National Preservation Conference this year! In their Press Release announcing this here is what they said about Indianapolis:

"The National Trust for Historic Preservation selected Indianapolis to host the 2013 National Preservation Conference because It is a city where landmarks and historic districts contribute powerfully to livability and economic redevelopment, a success story that will be instructive to conference attendees from throughout the U.S. The National Trust also believes the national audience can learn from the example of Indiana Landmarks, a robust statewide preservation organization."

Bear in mind that Indy bulldozed much of its historic architecture in the 1960's as part of Urban renewal. The historic neighborhoods in Indianapolis are highly prized and some of the most expensive in the city. You can easily drop 250K on small 800 sq ft shotgun cottage in Lockerbie or near a million in Old Northside for a restored Victorian. They spend significantly more in city staffing on preservation. Its not easy to demo something in Indy. Try to demo something significant and the lawyers, community leaders and preservationists are lined up to stop it.

I should point out that one we left Indy for Cincinnati for its historic architecture and two because Indy has restored just about everything of historic value. I vividly remember a couple of deacdes ago when I started restoring in Indy people thought I was crazy for fixing up those old houses because NOBODY would ever buy them and NOBODY would ever want to live in those "run down" neighborhoods.

Cincinnati could actually learn somethiong from Indy.. they Know what they lost now and regret EVER tearing down their history. We still have chance.
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Old 01-14-2013, 03:37 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
477 posts, read 529,700 times
Reputation: 275
Indianapolis does a good job of being Indianapolis, Cincinnati needs to do a better job of being Cincinnati.
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Old 01-14-2013, 04:13 PM
 
Location: Beavercreek, OH
2,194 posts, read 3,011,892 times
Reputation: 2334
Quote:
Originally Posted by neilworms2 View Post
Indianapolis does a good job of being Indianapolis, Cincinnati needs to do a better job of being Cincinnati.
Hi all--

^^ This.

Cincinnati needs to be Cincinnati. Cincinnati needs to stop trying to be like Portland.
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Old 01-14-2013, 04:26 PM
 
2,492 posts, read 3,652,150 times
Reputation: 1385
Quote:
Originally Posted by hensleya1 View Post
Hi all--

^^ This.

Cincinnati needs to be Cincinnati. Cincinnati needs to stop trying to be like Portland.
So good ideas from other cities shouldn't be tried here? We should continue to operate in the 1970s in regards to transportation while the rest of the nation/world laps us? Maybe we should add a few more interstate lanes and build a few more interchanges? More and further out suburbs? More cars clogging the roads?

Incidentally, virtually everything in Cincinnati's built environment was first done somewhere else. So Cincinnati has, in fact, copied other cities. The wildly successful Banks project is based on what works in other cities. Our stadiums are versions of what is in other cities. Our downtown streets are named after streets in other older cities. Our most famous bridge has a duplicate in NYC. Heck, our most prized neighborhood (OTR) was built by immigrants copying their old country.

But, yea, let's not try to do what works in Portland and other cities just because some suburban Tea Partiers don't like the streetcar.

Last edited by abr7rmj; 01-14-2013 at 04:35 PM..
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Old 01-14-2013, 04:45 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,827,124 times
Reputation: 924
Quote:
Originally Posted by abr7rmj View Post
So good ideas from other cities shouldn't be tried here? We should continue to operate in the 1970s in regards to transportation while the rest of the nation/world laps us? Maybe we should add a few more interstate lanes and build a few more interchanges? More and further out suburbs? More cars clogging the roads?

Incidentally, virtually everything in Cincinnati's built environment was first done somewhere else. So Cincinnati has, in fact, copied other cities. The wildly successful Banks project is based on what works in other cities. Our stadiums are versions of what is in other cities. Our downtown streets are named after streets in other older cities. Our most famous bridge has a duplicate in NYC. Heck, our most prized neighborhood (OTR) was built by immigrants copying their old country.

But, yea, let's not try to do what works in Portland and other cities just because some suburban Tea Partiers don't like the streetcar.
Hi all --

^^ This.

Cincinnati needs to keep what on doing what it's doing and learn from other places that have been successful!
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Old 01-14-2013, 04:47 PM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,358,349 times
Reputation: 1919
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomJones123 View Post
So short sighted. Cities around the country have been rebuilt over the years on preservation and restoration, becoming very vibrant, attracting residents, businesses, etc. Growing, thriving cities. Cincinnati is catching on, and hopefully in the not so distant future will follow suit.
No not short sighted. Many successful businesses have been stopped in their tracks when there was no one in line to continue them. I contend this is the same for houses. If you are devoted to restoring older homes that is commendable. But just like a business, who do you have in line to succeed you?
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Old 01-14-2013, 04:52 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,827,124 times
Reputation: 924
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
No not short sighted. Many successful businesses have been stopped in their tracks when there was no one in line to continue them. I contend this is the same for houses. If you are devoted to restoring older homes that is commendable. But just like a business, who do you have in line to succeed you?
Yes, short sighted. If we are talking restoring homes in an up and coming urban neighborhood, such as OTR, then it's a sound investment. Oh, wait. One should only restore a home only if he has an heir apparent. Silly me.

You aren't making any sense. Are you also suggesting that someone shouldn't go build a new home out in the suburbs unless they have someone in line to succeed them? Or is this just your newest attempt to grab straws at why historic restoration efforts in Cincinnati are doomed to fail?
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Old 01-14-2013, 05:00 PM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,358,349 times
Reputation: 1919
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomJones123 View Post
Yes, short sighted. If we are talking restoring homes in an up and coming urban neighborhood, such as OTR, then it's a sound investment. Oh, wait. One should only restore a home only if he has an heir apparent. Silly me.

You aren't making any sense. Are you also suggesting that someone shouldn't go build a new home out in the suburbs unless they have someone in line to succeed them? Or is this just your newest attempt to grab straws at why historic restoration efforts in Cincinnati are doomed to fail?
A pretty pathetic attempt to devalue my opinions. Where did I say restoration attempts are doomed to fail? I simply stated those who devote a lot of time, energy, and money to such need to reflect on what will come of them once they are no longer around. It is a simple fact older restrored propety will rapidly deteriorate unless some dedicated person is there to maintain their upkeep. Why is that a simple fact, simply because they are old and old tends to deteriorate faster. I simply said if you are going to devote that much time, energy, and money to the project you would naturally like for it to continue after you are gone. Is this not the desire of human nature?
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