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Old 02-11-2013, 08:37 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
3,335 posts, read 5,750,269 times
Reputation: 2058

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KJBrill -- very good points. We take a lot for granted and forget much of the toughness of the past. The original intention of urban planning in the USA was to take care of health issues. When you have tons of people packed in super-dense; man that can get messy. And dark, and cramped. A breeding ground for disease not to mention misery.

Fortunately, we have solved those problems. Modern sanitary systems, modern building systems and so on all but eliminate the nastiness that once accompanied city life. Modern high density living in a developed country is a very different thing than it once was.
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Old 02-11-2013, 08:52 AM
 
Location: Beavercreek, OH
2,194 posts, read 3,028,208 times
Reputation: 2334
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
The arguments concerning oil will continue to go on until it just plain runs out. When I look back at the history of using oil and realize just how short a period that is and the rate of consumption I have to think we are using up a resource which took millions of years to produce in a flash. But human nature is a rather poor conservator, we want what we want when we want it. So cars and trucks will rule until the oil runs out. Then we will say H*ly Sh*t Now What?
Hi kjbrill--

I wonder what the people of Easter Island thought when they cut the last tree down to build their stone statues.

As an alternative from a fuel economy standpoint, I would argue that we need even more decentralization. It's just not practical to have everyone commute downtown to a CBD if they live in a far-flung suburb, and no affordable transit solution could ever make a meaningful dent in traffic coming from Mason to go downtown.

Thus, places like Union Centre are the way of the future - someone living and working in West Chester would be far more environmentally friendly than if he had to commute downtown everyday and stew in traffic.


Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill
Those who want to glamorize the past thankfully never had to live there.
^^This. I admit I'm guilty of it myself (looking back at high school and only remembering the good times for instance).
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Old 02-11-2013, 01:40 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
3,335 posts, read 5,750,269 times
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Originally Posted by hensleya1 View Post
As an alternative from a fuel economy standpoint, I would argue that we need even more decentralization. It's just not practical to have everyone commute downtown to a CBD if they live in a far-flung suburb, and no affordable transit solution could ever make a meaningful dent in traffic coming from Mason to go downtown.
As inconvenient as downtown may be to mason, it is the central location. People can live in florence, mason, harrison, wherever and converge on downtown. If the office is in Florence, for example, people from mason would take a hard look before taking on that commute. Imagine commuting from Anderson to Harrison every day. So when the company goes to the burbs, they limit the talent pool somewhat.
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Old 02-11-2013, 01:57 PM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,416,907 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by progmac View Post
As inconvenient as downtown may be to mason, it is the central location. People can live in florence, mason, harrison, wherever and converge on downtown. If the office is in Florence, for example, people from mason would take a hard look before taking on that commute. Imagine commuting from Anderson to Harrison every day. So when the company goes to the burbs, they limit the talent pool somewhat.
But guess what, they servive. When my former company moved from Norwood to Mason, people said no way! I lucked out from a long commute to less than a mile. Others were not so lucky. But you know what I only know of a few who said No Way. I would have too since they came from southern NKY. Norwood was a stretch. Mason was more than a stretch. But when we moved, we had more applicants than we had job openings People loved the idea of working close to home and maybe never getting on an expressway.
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Old 02-11-2013, 02:39 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,844,393 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
People loved the idea of working close to home and maybe never getting on an expressway.
40 year ago.

Times have changed.
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Old 02-11-2013, 03:01 PM
 
2,492 posts, read 3,666,326 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TomJones123 View Post
40 year ago.

Times have changed.
Yea, and apparently places like Union Centre are the wave of the future!

I thoroughly enjoyed that bit of humor today.
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Old 02-11-2013, 03:03 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
3,335 posts, read 5,750,269 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
But guess what, they servive. When my former company moved from Norwood to Mason, people said no way! I lucked out from a long commute to less than a mile. Others were not so lucky. But you know what I only know of a few who said No Way. I would have too since they came from southern NKY. Norwood was a stretch. Mason was more than a stretch. But when we moved, we had more applicants than we had job openings People loved the idea of working close to home and maybe never getting on an expressway.
Certainly plenty of successful companies locate in the burbs. Even Microsoft. Sometimes you need the land, you need to create a campus. It isn't like GE is going to be testing engines downtown.

My youngish friends who move to the new south and work at suburban companies generally do the reverse commute. Live in the middle and commute out to the burbs. They are happy enough but wish the company was closer to the city or that they could take mass transit.
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Old 02-11-2013, 03:15 PM
 
2,492 posts, read 3,666,326 times
Reputation: 1385
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
But guess what, they servive. When my former company moved from Norwood to Mason, people said no way! I lucked out from a long commute to less than a mile. Others were not so lucky. But you know what I only know of a few who said No Way. I would have too since they came from southern NKY. Norwood was a stretch. Mason was more than a stretch. But when we moved, we had more applicants than we had job openings People loved the idea of working close to home and maybe never getting on an expressway.
People still love the idea of working close to home and never getting on an expressway. And many young people love the idea of never getting in a car at all. Which is exactly why cities are investing in rail transit. Nobody, save for one or two hardcore highway lovers on here, wants to spend two hours a day in stop-and-go interstate traffic staring at bumper stickers and break lights.
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Old 02-11-2013, 03:18 PM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
12,797 posts, read 12,824,597 times
Reputation: 5469
Quote:
Originally Posted by progmac View Post
KJBrill -- very good points. We take a lot for granted and forget much of the toughness of the past. The original intention of urban planning in the USA was to take care of health issues. When you have tons of people packed in super-dense; man that can get messy. And dark, and cramped. A breeding ground for disease not to mention misery.

Fortunately, we have solved those problems. Modern sanitary systems, modern building systems and so on all but eliminate the nastiness that once accompanied city life. Modern high density living in a developed country is a very different thing than it once was.
Agreed. Cities were the cesspools of the past, but today exist as the most vibrant hearts of most metros.
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Old 02-11-2013, 03:26 PM
 
2,492 posts, read 3,666,326 times
Reputation: 1385
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
Agreed. Cities were the cesspools of the past, but today exist as the most vibrant hearts of most metros.
Clearly you haven't been paying attention jbcmh81. In this thread, we've been enlightened to the fact that it's the extreme outer suburbs and places like Union Centre (or Polaris, in Columbus terms) that are the "future" and where people will want to live and work. The thousands of young people flocking back into cities today, apparently, are living in the past.
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