U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Happy Easter!
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Ohio > Cincinnati
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-13-2013, 02:10 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,830,579 times
Reputation: 924

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by abr7rmj View Post
if you look at most similar stadiums (outdoor NFL stadiums used only 10-12 times a year), they're located in lightly used areas, not high-profile prime real estate. No one is suggesting PBS should have been built in the suburbs like the Redskins did with FedEx Field in Landover, Md., but what's wrong with Queensgate or Camp Washington ... somewhere like that?
The Philadelphia Eagles, Phillies, and 76ers are a good example of what you are saying. They are all on the far south end of South Philly. Plenty of room for tailgating, parking, etc.

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Lincoln+Financial+Field

Granted Philly is laid out totally differently than Cincinnati. So, I do agree that having a ballpark and domed football stadium would make sense for Cincy's river front more so than PBS does.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-16-2013, 11:54 AM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,369,950 times
Reputation: 1920
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomJones123 View Post
The Philadelphia Eagles, Phillies, and 76ers are a good example of what you are saying. They are all on the far south end of South Philly. Plenty of room for tailgating, parking, etc.

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Lincoln+Financial+Field

Granted Philly is laid out totally differently than Cincinnati. So, I do agree that having a ballpark and domed football stadium would make sense for Cincy's river front more so than PBS does.
The only good investment in a domed stadium is how it contributes to more events per year compared to the cost of construction and maintenance. At the time PBS was constructed, I did not feel there was any justification for a domed stadium, and I still feel that way. Just what additional events would be held there, more specifically what revenue producing events?

Who wants to attend a basketball game in a football stadium, virtually noone? Other than a couple of Tractor Pulls and Big Truck Extravaganzas, who else is going to show up? Oh yes, I remember, the Paul McCartney concert at PBS I was routinely criticised for. You get how many of these, maybe 4 a century? That will keep your economic coffers churning.

PBS may not be perfect, but its footprint on the riverfront is certainly tolerable to keep Cincinnati in the Big Leagues.

Why is UC going to invest millions in Nippert Stadium when PBS is sitting there just how many miles away? Very obviously, the reason all governmental operations, and I certainly lump state supported universities in that catagory, exist. Feather our nest, we do not want to share with anyone. That may require we work out a mutual schedule and have to compromise.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-16-2013, 02:58 PM
 
1,295 posts, read 1,520,297 times
Reputation: 687
In order to make games at PBS profitable for the Bearcats, they have to have an enormous attendance. Even then, Mike Brown makes out like a bandit, while campus athletics make less than at a moderately attended game at Nippert, where all admissions and concessions proceeds go straight to UC.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-16-2013, 03:07 PM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,369,950 times
Reputation: 1920
Quote:
Originally Posted by natininja View Post
In order to make games at PBS profitable for the Bearcats, they have to have an enormous attendance. Even then, Mike Brown makes out like a bandit, while campus athletics make less than at a moderately attended game at Nippert, where all admissions and concessions proceeds go straight to UC.
Oh, so that was the deal with PBS? The Bengals have the say as to who else uses the stadium and they control all of the concessions? Who struck that wonderful deal? The County not only builds you a new stadium into which you put nothing, but makes it your own private sandbox. Are any of those commissioners still around?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-16-2013, 04:56 PM
 
Location: Over-the-Rhine, Ohio
548 posts, read 608,329 times
Reputation: 643
I swear that d*** stadium is one of the worst municipal deals in US history. What do we have to do to get out of it? Declare bankruptcy? At this point, it might be worth it. Mike Brown is continually dipping his hands into every attempt at improving our riverfront.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-16-2013, 07:43 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati(Silverton)
1,576 posts, read 2,304,412 times
Reputation: 651
^First of all it is two stadiums build by the county. Second. No one ever says what the sweet deal the Reds have gotten. No one else can use that stadium. Third. If the Bengals are winning. The people who lives in Hamilton county voted for both stadiums, now they live with it.

There is no god given right that things must go our way every time.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-16-2013, 08:56 PM
 
1,295 posts, read 1,520,297 times
Reputation: 687
Sorry, I shouldn't have said that because I don't know what, if anything, MB gets for UC games. But here are reasons it's not good for UC to play there:

• At Paul Brown, UC doesn’t have control of all ticket sales, concessions, parking, suites and sponsorship opportunities;
• It takes away fundraising and recognition opportunities that UC would have on campus at Nippert Stadium;
• When UC hosted West Virginia University and the University of Louisville at Paul Brown Stadium in 2011, UC posted “six-figure losses” for both games, even though attendance was much higher than the capacity at Nippert Stadium;
• The 200,000 visitors to UC’s campus for football games wouldn’t get a chance to check out UC and the surrounding area.


Source: Babcock: Here?s why playing at Paul Brown Stadium hurts UC - Business Courier


Whether or not it's MB getting the cash, it's not UC.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-17-2013, 12:04 AM
 
6,351 posts, read 18,893,343 times
Reputation: 9895
Um; the title of this thread is: "Rant on Interstate Highway System". Rants about sports facilities should be in a seperate thread...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-17-2013, 08:10 AM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,369,950 times
Reputation: 1920
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crew Chief View Post
Um; the title of this thread is: "Rant on Interstate Highway System". Rants about sports facilities should be in a seperate thread...
Agreed since I started this thread. But ranting on the stadium deal is so much more fun. I know very few people who do not feel the public got hosed by that deal. Maybe business is still in favor so they can say we are a major league city when recruiting people. But they are not the ones paying the bill. Neither am I, but I can feel sorry for the Hamilton Co. residents who are. In addition, every area HS baseball or football playoff game should be held in one of these edifices, they are public property. And the schools should have to pay nothing for the privilege.

But back to the interstates. The only thing I keep seeing relative to them are predictions of horrendous upkeep costs far exceeding the gas tax revenue. Then I look at the gas tax revenue. The Federal tax on gasoline is 18.4 cents per gallon. In Ohio the total is 46.4 cents per gallon. So Ohio is collecting (46.4-18.4) or 28 cents per gallon on its own.

One suggestion I have is make the gasoline (diesel, etc.) tax not a fixed amount per gallon but on a sliding scale, set on a base price per gallon of fuel but then increasing whenever that price per gallon is raised. I also suggest the tax increase per gallon be at a higher percentage than the fuel increase.

For example, just assume the base gas price is $3.00 per gallon. Out of that, in Ohio 46.4 cents is going for taxes or 15.5%. Raise the price to $3.50 per gallon. The taxes increase 50% of the increase or 25 cents per gallon. So the taxes now amount to 71.4 cents per gallon or 20.4%. I declare under such a scheme these wildly fluctuating fuel prices would calm down. And don't forget, these taxes have to be paid by the seller (retailer) of the product. If the taxes changed every time they changed the unit cost, it would become a bookkeeping nightmare.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-18-2013, 06:36 AM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,369,950 times
Reputation: 1920
OK, got the name of the thread changed. You now can post on any subject which irritates you and still be on topic.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Ohio > Cincinnati
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top