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Old 01-21-2013, 10:20 AM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,377,243 times
Reputation: 1920

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Quote:
Originally Posted by TomJones123 View Post
I disagree with restorationconsultant on a lot of points, and feel he is being particularly hard on Cincinnati. I am a former New Yorker who isn't looking for New York in Cincinnati. He makes a very valid point in saying Cincinnati is no Chicago, and for that I am thankful. If you can learn to appreciate Cincinnati for it's own merits you will find there is surprisingly a lot here. But you have to be willing to learn where it is, and don't be pretentious towards people here. Personally, I have found this to be a very friendly city where I can say hi to people walking down the street.

Mount Adams, Downtown/OTR, and definately check out Prospect Hill. Grocery stores aren't an issue. They are a short drive in any direction. There are a lot of very cool shopping options in Cincinnati, that frankly, stack up better than a full service grocery store. Though, there are no shortage of grocery stores.
A full service grocery store should not be the swaying factor unless you are committed to living without a car. In my estimation, OTR, Mt Adams both have limitations relative to a full service grocery store, I can't think of any there. But that is not the reason you elect to live there. If you want everything at your feet, Cincinnati is probably not for you. But remember, Cincy is not Chicago. I was talking to my son last night who came out to visit, and he remarked Dad I have realized there is practically no place in Cincinnati you cannot get to in less than a half hour. You are out here in what they call the boonies (Mason) and we got here in less than 30 minutes from where we live (Mt Airy). How many other cities can claim this kind of travel time?
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Old 01-21-2013, 10:24 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,832,929 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
A full service grocery store should not be the swaying factor unless you are committed to living without a car.
Exactly, which I would advise against in Cincinnati. From Mount Adams there is a Kroger and a Rempke Biggs right across the river. Not to mention the Kroger at Vine and McMillan. We shop mostly at Findlay Market and Clifton Natural Foods. Only need an occasional trip to Kroger for toiletries and such. So I don't know what all the "lack of grocery stores" stuff is coming from.

What Cincinnati has an abundance of is high quality goods. Check Findlay Market to see what I am talking about. The items I get from Findlay Market are FAR superior to similar items at Krogers.
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Old 01-21-2013, 11:19 AM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,377,243 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TomJones123 View Post
Exactly, which I would advise against in Cincinnati. From Mount Adams there is a Kroger and a Rempke Biggs right across the river. Not to mention the Kroger at Vine and McMillan. We shop mostly at Findlay Market and Clifton Natural Foods. Only need an occasional trip to Kroger for toiletries and such. So I don't know what all the "lack of grocery stores" stuff is coming from.

What Cincinnati has an abundance of is high quality goods. Check Findlay Market to see what I am talking about. The items I get from Findlay Market are FAR superior to similar items at Krogers.
Simply, you need more than just toilet paper, you need a variety of household products to disinfect, clean, and just make life tolerable unless you at just too lazy to perform it. Just a comment on quality. I have no doubt Findlay Market has great fresh foods available, but if you need some paper goods or detergent likely not here.

On a side note, my son and daughter-in-law were at our house yesterday. We cooked our 4th and likely last batch of Cincinnati Goetta for the season. This time we cut it down to 4-1/2 hours preparation as we wanted to see the football games, turned up the heat and stirred like Hell.
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Old 01-21-2013, 11:25 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,832,929 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TomJones123 View Post
Only need an occasional trip to Kroger for toiletries and such. So I don't know what all the "lack of grocery stores" stuff is coming from.
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
Simply, you need more than just toilet paper, you need a variety of household products to disinfect, clean, and just make life tolerable unless you at just too lazy to perform it.
I think I covered that with toiletries and SUCH. Of course I could school you on how me and the Mrs. do it. We make our own disinfectant, and laundry detergent, and buy home-made soap from Findlay Market. We also use cloth napkins, and disch cloths, and don't rely on paper towels - using them sparingly.

No need for a variety of cleaning products. Only a few.

We save a LOT of money doing things this way. You would be surprised what you can do with rubbing alcohol, washing soda, Fels Naptha, Borax, etc.
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Old 01-21-2013, 11:33 AM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,377,243 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TomJones123 View Post
I think I covered that with toiletries and SUCH. Of course I could school you on how me and the Mrs. do it. We make our own disinfectant, and laundry detergent, and buy home-made soap from Findlay Market. We also use cloth napkins, and disch cloths, and don't rely on paper towels - using them sparingly.

No need for a variety of cleaning products. Only a few.
Glad you leave such a Green life. And you want to make me believe the home-made soap you buy from Frindlay Market is so much more enrivonmentally friendly than what you can buy in the grocery? We also use cloth dish cloths and towels, but do I believe they are more environmentaly friendly? - No! I use them because I am a cheap skate.
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Old 01-21-2013, 11:35 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,832,929 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TomJones123 View Post
We save a LOT of money doing things this way. You would be surprised what you can do with rubbing alcohol, washing soda, Fels Naptha, Borax, etc.
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
Glad you leave such a Green life.
I never said a WORD about anything green, except the money I save. We should let this thread go back on topic.

And I gave sufficient examples of how there are full service grocery stores in the area, with everything a person could need.
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Old 01-21-2013, 11:54 AM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
477 posts, read 530,405 times
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Quote:
Grocery shopping is an issue. Seems like many hop across the river for convenience. Since you are coming from Chicago I would strongly advise taking a few days and spending some serious time exploring the city and meeting the people. It absolutely is not Chicago, not even close, so before you make a move be sure its your cup of tea. Cincinnati is not known for world-renowned shopping, dining, museums, nor is it a glamorous Cultural destination.
Very true. Living in Chicago after spending 5 years in Cincinnati I would have to agree. Another big shock will be genuine hillbillies, its a lot more southern than you would think. (The lack of them was a shock to me in Chicago).

I'm going to personally recommend Downtown for you, did some research on finding places for my brother a few years ago when he moved back to the area and wanted something close to his job. There are apartments from Towne Properties on Garfield place. Obviously not quite as urban as Streeterville (heck only Manhattan in this country is more urban than that!) but probably about as good as you can do in Cincinnati. See DownTowne Living | Home

Also recommended is Roebling Point in Covington, very nice neighborhood that gets overlooked a lot because its in Kentucky, there is even a bus that runs every 15 mins across the river and there is a small old style grocery called Bessler's Economy Market (nothing fancy but it is full service and very walkable) from that area. Lower your expectations on groceries, though the neighborhood is absolutely beautiful more so than only a small number of areas in Lincoln park for a fraction of the cost.

There is a grocery on Vine and 15th in OTR, its a bit seedy, and a bit low on some specialty items, but at the very least you can get basics there and go up to Findlay market to get better stuff. Findlay market is kind of like an old style version of the French Market under Olgilvie to give you an idea.

Also if in Mt. Adams don't forget the grocery in McMillian, they are trying to get people to go there, the area is a bit sketchy, but the grocery is a larger one than in OTR and very close to MT. Adams though not good walking distance. There is an aggressive campaign to keep it open and improve that store as part of a revitalization plan for that neighborhood.
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Old 01-21-2013, 11:55 AM
 
69 posts, read 115,957 times
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Thanks for the suggestion guys! The Reserve in downtown, Renaissance at Power Building, and the apartments at downtowne living seem to be kind of what I'm looking for. I might also check out the U of C area.

I don't want this to be another a city bashing thread. Believe me, I'm from Memphis and spent several years in detroit, both of which have their own problems. I have also lived in several large cities including atlanta, DC, boston, detroit, and chicago. Each cities had their plusses and minuses.

I'm under no illusion that Cincinnati has all of the amenities that Chicago has; however, I received a nice job offer in Cincinnati, which is why I'm considering it, and ultimately thats the most important thing!

I'm also looking at Salt Lake City, which is a little a quiet, but I see that the downtown has a very nice upscale supermarket in the heart of its downtown called Harmons.

can anyone comment how the banks are progressing or if tower place is going to be something worthwhile again?

Thanks again!

Last edited by det2011sb; 01-21-2013 at 12:06 PM..
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Old 01-21-2013, 11:57 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,832,929 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by neilworms2 View Post
Very true. Living in Chicago after spending 5 years in Cincinnati I would have to agree. Another big shock will be genuine hillbillies, its a lot more southern than you would think. (The lack of them was a shock to me in Chicago).
With Kentucky right across the river, there are hilljacks around. Really, you won't find too many of them downtown/uptown.
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Old 01-21-2013, 12:02 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,832,929 times
Reputation: 924
Quote:
Originally Posted by det2011sb View Post
I'm under no illusion that Cincinnati has all of the amenities that Chicago has; however, I received a nice job offer in Cincinnati, which is why I'm considering it, and ultimately thats the most important thing!
Cincinnati is deceiving in that it was a big city early in it's existence. You will be very surprised at the amenities you will find here. I know I was. I even considered moving back to NYC, or South Philly recently, only to find Cincinnati very hard to give up.

Quote:
Originally Posted by det2011sb View Post
can anyone comment how the banks are progressing or if tower place is going to be something worthwhile again?
Thanks again!
The Banks is mostly full and is a happening place street level. Hard to say about Tower Place, though something will be done with it. Overall, downtown Cincinnati is a vibrant place and it's only getting better. If you were to move here now, you would basically be getting on the ground floor of Cincinnati's renaissance. That's the way I see it anyway, and I am downtown almost daily and live in CUF.

Best of luck, and congrats on your offers!
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