U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Ohio > Cincinnati
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-01-2013, 05:31 PM
 
443 posts, read 1,018,094 times
Reputation: 188

Advertisements

I have lived in Cincy for over 10 years and I look around and lot of people I know have left for as they say greener pastures. I do go to visit and see them doing better than they are here. Some have moved to southwest but from what I have been reading Cincy population growth has really decreased steadily in the last decade?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-01-2013, 07:41 PM
 
50 posts, read 65,434 times
Reputation: 46
The changes I have seen in this city since moving here in 2007 have been staggering - in a good way. I definitely wouldn't say this city is stuck in a rut. It still think it isn't living up to its full potential, but it's getting there. Downtown/OTR it's getting there in leaps and bounds; other neighborhoods, maybe more slowly. And maybe other neighborhoods have taken some steps backwards. But as a whole I'd say the city's outlook is promising and on the upward swing.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-01-2013, 08:49 PM
 
1,295 posts, read 1,519,013 times
Reputation: 687
Even the local fuddy-duddy media is finding it difficult to deny that the city is chugging forward. As we all know, they are the last to pick up on any goings-on in the area. The Enquirer today wrote about the dunnhumby HQ's groundbreaking as being a sign of downtown's "Renaissance", because a prominent plot of land, about which there have been failed ambitions for years, is finally being developed. I don't know if that's the best sign (surely it is one of them), but for the Enquirer to print about downtown's Renaissance tells us not only that it is real, but that it's pretty far along.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-21-2013, 11:16 PM
 
Location: South Austin near Wm Cannon and South First
164 posts, read 241,249 times
Reputation: 185
Indianapolis has pretty much took off and left Cincy behind. It wasn't all that long ago that Cincy was a much bigger city than indy. But not so anymore. it doesn't seem like Cincy has much room to grow. Thet are in a situation similar to Detroit and St Louis. Surrounded by the Ohio River on one side and suburbs on other sides, there's hardly any room at all for Cincy to grow unless a bunch of high rise condos are built all over the town, like they are doing in Dallas and Austin. Indianapolis has lots and lots of room to grow and could easily go over a million in the next 20 or 30 years. I doubt if Cincinnatti will ever reach a million. Would love to see Indianapolis go after the Reds and bring them to Indy.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-21-2013, 11:50 PM
 
1,295 posts, read 1,519,013 times
Reputation: 687
LOL.

If Cincy created a unigov like Indy has, their populations would be really close. Marion and Hamilton counties are very close in population. Regardless, that's a silly metric to use for saying Indy has left Cincy in the dust.

Cincy still has a bigger MSA by far, and if Philadelphia didn't cockblock Cincy and Dayton from merging CSAs, that would be another metric by which one could say "Cincinnati has left Indy in the dust!!!"

Enjoy your state government to inflate employment and median incomes. We have a city playing that same game, including the huge land area expansion to inflate population. Enjoy having suburban "city" residents with the power to develop an already-bland downtown in Applebee's image.

I'd rather have a smaller city with charm and character. Indy will never leave Cincy in the dust. If the numbers were to say that, it would be like Houston "leaving New Orleans in the dust". So what? I know which of those cities I'd rather step foot in: New Orleans. Despite the depressed state of NOLA (much worse than Cincy's) and the booming economy/population of Houston (much better than Indy's).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-22-2013, 12:06 AM
 
864 posts, read 1,196,523 times
Reputation: 310
Quote:
Originally Posted by i35vagabond View Post
Indianapolis has pretty much took off and left Cincy behind. It wasn't all that long ago that Cincy was a much bigger city than indy. But not so anymore. it doesn't seem like Cincy has much room to grow. Thet are in a situation similar to Detroit and St Louis. Surrounded by the Ohio River on one side and suburbs on other sides, there's hardly any room at all for Cincy to grow unless a bunch of high rise condos are built all over the town, like they are doing in Dallas and Austin. Indianapolis has lots and lots of room to grow and could easily go over a million in the next 20 or 30 years. I doubt if Cincinnatti will ever reach a million. Would love to see Indianapolis go after the Reds and bring them to Indy.
What a joke.

Of course Indy is a bigger city. It has almost 5 times the land area as Cincinnati. Cincinnati has a larger metro population which continues to grow, and Cincinnati itself is making huge improvements. We have been receiving national attention for the renaissance we are experiencing. We are in much better shape than Detroit.

Also, how has Indy "left Cincy behind"? I can't think of one single advantage Indy has over Cincy, with the exception of a larger population. Cincinnati's economy is in better shape and is, by far, a more attractive city than Indy.

Lastly, the Reds won't be leaving Cincinnati any time soon, so dream on.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-22-2013, 08:14 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
31,164 posts, read 57,274,608 times
Reputation: 52030
Quote:
Originally Posted by i35vagabond View Post
Would love to see Indianapolis go after the Reds and bring them to Indy.
Um, no. That's not happening.

However ... Indy is a great place and has come a long way since the first time I visited in the early 80s. So congrats on that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-22-2013, 10:26 AM
 
3,008 posts, read 4,163,793 times
Reputation: 1524
Quote:
Originally Posted by CinciFan View Post
What a joke.

Of course Indy is a bigger city. It has almost 5 times the land area as Cincinnati. Cincinnati has a larger metro population which continues to grow, and Cincinnati itself is making huge improvements. We have been receiving national attention for the renaissance we are experiencing. We are in much better shape than Detroit.

Also, how has Indy "left Cincy behind"? I can't think of one single advantage Indy has over Cincy, with the exception of a larger population. Cincinnati's economy is in better shape and is, by far, a more attractive city than Indy.

Lastly, the Reds won't be leaving Cincinnati any time soon, so dream on.
Well no, Cincy economy not in better shape. Indy GDP actually 5 billion more than Cincy despite the 400k population difference between areas.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-22-2013, 10:32 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,827,124 times
Reputation: 924
Quote:
Originally Posted by msamhunter View Post
Well no, Cincy economy not in better shape.
Yes we are.

February 2013 standings for On Numbers Economic Index - The Business Journals

Cincy is 18 and Indy is 38. And please don't come back with dated stats. Cincy is on the rise.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-22-2013, 11:10 AM
 
Location: Indianapolis and Cincinnati
682 posts, read 1,387,611 times
Reputation: 609
Lived in both so here are the facts, Indy has a typically packed downtown. Not only due to the fact is has one of the most thriving convention businesses in the US. It is also adding downtown population at a rate that would be the envy of OTR. It has a real downtown grocery "The marketplace at Lockerbie" and is adding a second store a part of an 85 Million dollar new development
RTV6 - New Marsh To Anchor Downtown Development - News Story

There have been 10-15 major new downtown condos and apartment complexes and they are not low to moderate income in the last few years with at least a dozen more in the works or under construction.

There are two new major retail/residential developments starting on Mass Avenue. Indy has a Conrad hotel , White River state Park, the canal district, a plethora of museums downtown, A downtown zoo, Major league football and basketball, it hosted a superbowl and the sports combine is this weekend. It has a downtown mall that thrives, and there are hundreds of unique eateries and restaurants downtown offerring food from just about every country imaginable.

In terms of DOWNTOWN development Indy is what Cincinnati wants to be but is a good 10 years behind. Its getting there but has a long way to go.

Now Cincinnati has things Indy would die for. Findlay Market for example, the Music Hall.

Indinapolis's biggest mistake? It tore down much of its downtown neighborhoods in the 1960's and 70's as part of Urban Renewal. leaving itself with only about 15 downtown neighborhoods that today are some of the most expensive real estate in the state. It has done such a good job of preservation over the last few decades that it was chosen as the site of this year national trust convention this year.
Preservation Leadership Forum - National Preservation Conference 2013 | Indianapolis IN

What is Cincinnati doing? The same thing Indy did in the 1960's, tearing down restorable hosues in the name of "Blight Abatement'. 600 THIS YEAR alone. not to mention losses that may happen in Fairmount due to the MSD project. The recent losses in Corryville for student housing and the possilbe loss of the Goetz manion for more student housing.


No one would EVER consider tearing down something like the Gamble house or Goetz mansion in Indy today becaus they realize what a stupid thing 'urban renewal/blight abatement was and it almost killed the city.

So why did I come to Cincinnati from Indy? Because I believe in historic preservation and I believe this city has ONE thing going for it and it is the finest collection of historic architecture in the nation. Unfortunately it has city government addicted to federal and state demo money to keep its bloated 'good ole boy city employees in a job". I have learned there are two ways people leave Cincinnati city government, they retire OR they are hauled away in handcuffs. The level of corruption and nepotism in this city government is unlike anything I have ever seen and I work all across the US.

The good thing about Cincinnati is that it is beginning to attract out of state people who realize what this city could be and hopefully can derail this 'Detroit based' failed urban planning model of blight=bulldozer. and we can get rid of useless regulation that make development next to impossible , unless you are 3CDC.

If we can eventually elect some people who care more about neighborhoods that kickbacks, we have chance.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Ohio > Cincinnati
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top