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Old 01-24-2013, 09:35 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
3,335 posts, read 5,727,944 times
Reputation: 2058

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Quote:
Originally Posted by TomJones123 View Post
Not really. You checked into housing prices in NYC, Boston, San Fran, etc., lately?

Philly is expensive compared to Cincy, but cheap compared to the cities I mentioned.
it's a different world of housing prices. but the idea that people will leave in droves because of them to inland cities isn't based in reality.
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Old 01-24-2013, 09:38 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,828,826 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by natininja View Post
My prediction is that a tipping point is looming where people will begin to realize the cost of living in the big (expensive) coastal cities is not made up for in the amenities provided. People will realize they've been overlooking legitimate options which they'd long dismissed out-of-hand for no reason other than everyone they know having done the same. The Midwest has a lot of gems to be discovered, and Cincinnati in particular will charm the pants off those wandering eyes.

As for Pittsburgh, I think it has two big things elevating it: 1) strong university presence (What other "struggling" medium-sized city has a CMU equivalent?) 2) Richard Florida called it home for a number of years. Florida is the arbiter of all things pop-urban. I mentioned that one of Cincinnati's biggest struggles is (geography and) media related, and he single-handed takes a huge chunk out of the media narrative problem for Pittsburgh.
Quote:
Originally Posted by progmac View Post
it's a different world of housing prices. but the idea that people will leave in droves because of them to inland cities isn't based in reality.
Well, to be certain, he never said in droves. Only that there would be a tipping point where an unspecified number of people would realize they have overlooked mid-western cities. And in that context, Cincinnati would stand out as a gem to be discovered.

The cost of living is one of the main reasons I want to stay here.

Really, what's so far fetched about that? It's happening in Pittsburgh. Not to mention more and more light is being shed on Cincinnati's comeback.
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Old 01-24-2013, 09:41 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
3,335 posts, read 5,727,944 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TomJones123 View Post
Well, to be certain, he never said in droves. Only that there would be a tipping point where an unspecified number of people would realize they have overlooked mid-western cities. And in that context, Cincinnati would stand out as a gem to be discovered.

The cost of living is one of the main reasons I want to stay here.

Really, what's so far fetched about that? It's happening in Pittsburgh. Not to mention more and more light is being shed on Cincinnati's comeback.
Fair enough. There is an expression, 'you look for the horse you ride on.' Meaning that we tend to look for evidence of others doing what we are doing while dismissing conflicting information. Sort of like confirmation bias. I felt like that was afoot in the post about 'people' (generally) leaving the coasts to move to inland cities like Cincinnati. You and me live here for specific reasons that make sense to us and I think other people live where they live for specific reasons that make sense to them.

But we could be doing more to attract people who think like you do and who would move for the reasons you do. In those cases, we are competing not against San Francisco but against Nashville, Pittsburgh, and Indianapolis and it is helpful to compare ourselves against those cities.
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Old 01-24-2013, 09:56 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,828,826 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by progmac View Post
Fair enough. There is an expression, 'you look for the horse you ride on.' Meaning that we tend to look for evidence of others doing what we are doing while dismissing conflicting information. Sort of like confirmation bias. I felt like that was afoot in the post about 'people' (generally) leaving the coasts to move to inland cities like Cincinnati. You and me live here for specific reasons that make sense to us and I think other people live where they live for specific reasons that make sense to them.

But we could be doing more to attract people who think like you do and who would move for the reasons you do. In those cases, we are competing not against San Francisco but against Nashville, Pittsburgh, and Indianapolis and it is helpful to compare ourselves against those cities.
I appreciate the perspective, thanks!
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Old 01-24-2013, 10:27 AM
 
800 posts, read 696,704 times
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>also would help for federal funding of things like transportation. I'm kind of baffled that there isn't at least infrequent transport up and down 75 - I mean there is a good market for people wanting to get from Cincinnati to the Dayton airport due to CVG being obscenely expensive. Might even be a good private business opportunity.

The only ways to get between Cincinnati besides driving:

1. Greyhound (4-5 buses per day, schedule doesn't coincide with regular work hours)
2. Ride 42X to Tylersville, bike 28 miles to Dayton Mall, ride Dayton buses into town
3. Bicyle the whole way
4. Walk
5. Kayak from Cincinnati public landing to Great Miami at Lawrenceburg, then up to Dayton
6. Hitchhike

Now if not for the election of Gov. Kasich the 3C's rail service would beginning operation right about now, so we'd actually have a civilized service connecting the two, although the travel time would have been relatively slow due to an indirect path through Hamilton and Middletown.

If we're going to get serious as a region it's going to take the state getting serious. That means creating a state authority that creates high frequency rail and bus service between the major and secondary cities. I know the will doesn't exist for Hamilton, Warren, Butler, and Montgomery counties to combine into a BART or MARTA that would create high quality intercity transit. Ideally you'd want an express route following I-75 and a local route on existing tracks that travels through Hamilton and Middletown. The express train has to hit speeds in exceess of 100mph in order to impress voters enough into voting for it.
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Old 01-24-2013, 10:35 AM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
477 posts, read 529,894 times
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Quote:
My prediction is that a tipping point is looming where people will begin to realize the cost of living in the big (expensive) coastal cities is not made up for in the amenities provided. People will realize they've been overlooking legitimate options which they'd long dismissed out-of-hand for no reason other than everyone they know having done the same. The Midwest has a lot of gems to be discovered, and Cincinnati in particular will charm the pants off those wandering eyes.
Of course they'd probably go to Chicago first because it has almost all the amenities and is HALF the cost of the coast cities :P. Cincy has a long way to go before it can compete with that even if its even cheaper than that, its very lacking in amenities.

Not to say that the potential isn't there - and it is in a much better position than say Indianapolis if it gets its act fully together.
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Old 01-24-2013, 10:49 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,828,826 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by neilworms2 View Post
Of course they'd probably go to Chicago first because it has almost all the amenities and is HALF the cost of the coast cities :P. Cincy has a long way to go before it can compete with that even if its even cheaper than that, its very lacking in amenities.

Not to say that the potential isn't there - and it is in a much better position than say Indianapolis if it gets its act fully together.
Eff Chicago. I get the distinct impression that a lot of the city is crime ridden and can't be enjoyed. Chicago had what, 499 murders in 2012?

Chicago Homicide Rate Spikes, While New York's Plummets

Largely due to gang violence. We all know you live in Chicago, and I'm not really impressed. It's more of a case of you moved there and like it, then more power to ya.

Personally, I have a friend who grew up on the south side. I went there in 2004 to stay with his mother who lives in Englewood near 73rd and Greene. He gave me the insiders tour. Saw the west side, south side, downtown, northside, we made out way up to Schaumburg even. There is no way I would ever live there. And at the time I was there considering investing in real estate because my friend grew up with some guys who were making out in Chicago's gentrification just south of downtown.

But really, why would I want to move my family to a place that is as saturated with gang violence as Chicago? I had my fill of that in LA. You can keep Chicago, I'll keep Cincy.

But do tell me just how Chicago is holding Cincinnati back? I would love to hear.

Some day you have to realize that Chicago is it's own baby, and Cincinnati doesn't need to compare to be a great place to live.
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Old 01-24-2013, 11:07 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
3,335 posts, read 5,727,944 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by neilworms2 View Post
Of course they'd probably go to Chicago first because it has almost all the amenities and is HALF the cost of the coast cities :P. Cincy has a long way to go before it can compete with that even if its even cheaper than that, its very lacking in amenities.

Not to say that the potential isn't there - and it is in a much better position than say Indianapolis if it gets its act fully together.
I like Chicago a lot. I'm certainly not counting you among them, but my biggest problem with Chicago is the amount people who claim to hate the midwest while living in the middle of it. The city itself is great and in general the people are friendly.

But that is neither here nor there. Cincinnati shouldn't try to compete against Chicago. No one who wants a tier I global city is going to move to Cincinnati. We should compete against our peers. We shouldn't care about someone who chooses Chicago instead of Cincy but we should care very much about someone who chooses Nashville over Cincy.
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Old 01-24-2013, 11:12 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,828,826 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by progmac View Post
but we should care very much about someone who chooses Nashville over Cincy.
I do agree that Cincinnati has a marketing problem. Someone needs to do something about it at some point. We certainly have a lot to offer, and it's only getting better.
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Old 01-24-2013, 11:41 AM
 
69 posts, read 115,829 times
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Actually, I'm wondering if it may actually be a good idea for the Cincinnati to market itself as an alternative to global cities.

It was funny when I interviewed in Cincinnati, how when we were discussing my time in Chicago, everyone was gushing about how they loved the city: Navy Pier, restaurants, museums, etc.. It almost felt like there was some sort of inferiority complex.

what's also funny is how people from "the city" aka Manhattan like to treat Chicago as a "quaint town".

However, when I visited I was impressed by the University of Cincinnati, the presence of so many corporate headquarters, and the strong presence of GE, honda, mitsubishi, etc.

For what it's worth wikipedia (Global city - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia) has cincinnati as a gamma+ world city ahead of phoenix, KC, pittsburgh, indy, tampa, columbus, and austin.

I love Chicago but downtown chicago is expensive. For me it was a decision to accept a lesser quality job in the suburbs at least an hour outside chicago or a high quality job in another city. What sold me to Cincinnati was the opportunity to become a leader in my field, good money, and the opportunity to live in a gobally relevant city (although clearly not to the degree as nyc, chicago, la, etc).

Also, for me the top cities were great not because of their bars, clubs, or coffeehouses. I don't really go to any one those. It's the opportunity to socialize, network, and even date with the smartest, most talented people in the country.

I think Cincinnati has the potential to be a really great magnet with a strong local university and 3 strong state universities within a bad rush hour's driving distance. finally, I share the same perspective as natininja as I see a potential tipping point when people rediscover the inland cities. When I visited SLC, I saw that there were a lot of transplants from southern and northern california as they were escaping the heat, the congestion, and the extremely high house prices. Same thing with Boise, Idaho. I see people continuing to leave the mid-atlantic but maybe they'll consider Cincinnati over atlanta, dallas, and houston due to it's milder climate, less congestion, and strong economic base. I also possibly see people leaving cities like atlanta, dallas, houston, even florida as those cities may be growing more rapidly they the infrastructure can keep up. If only Cincy could be seen as cool, or maybe it already is?
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