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Old 01-24-2013, 01:04 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,832,929 times
Reputation: 924

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Quote:
Originally Posted by det2011sb View Post
If only Cincy could be seen as cool, or maybe it already is?
It already is. To be seen as cool w/o being cool won't last anyway.
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Old 01-24-2013, 01:56 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
477 posts, read 530,405 times
Reputation: 275
Quote:
Eff Chicago. I get the distinct impression that a lot of the city is crime ridden and can't be enjoyed. Chicago had what, 499 murders in 2012?
I got my car broken into 2 times when I lived in Cincy for 5 years. Its never happened once in the 5 since I've lived here. A good chunk of the city is very safe, but if you are on 73rd street in Woodlawn (Southside) 70 murders happened in one day. Chicago is a tale of two cities, one that is growing in both population and income and the other that is a shrinking violent cespool. One is quite far from the other for the most part. Long term though I think the later will die off and the former will overtake it, but we're talking like 30 years or so.

Quote:
Actually, I'm wondering if it may actually be a good idea for the Cincinnati to market itself as an alternative to global cities.
This is a good idea, Cincy should position itself as full of amenities but more livable, a step above Indianapolis but below Chicago and coastal cities. I wish the city would improve its transit as well as open up a bit more to new ideas (without sacrificing the charming cultural quirks completely) which would make it hit that sweet spot. That and preservation should be a priority.

For example, I saw walnut hills on updated google maps and it was really sad to see an ENTIRE BLOCK of dense buildings from the mid-late 1800s gone - this just doesn't happen in other cities any more with buildings of this vintage and architectural quality the WHRDC and the city needs to redirect its demo funds into preservation of key neighborhoods like this and with demos planned for the original greaters building there is nothing left of what could have been an amazing urban neighborhood if it was allowed to grow the right way. Its almost like the city doesn't recognize the strategic importance of a dense business district like this outside of OTR.

While there are redevelopment plans, I think its bonheaded to a degree. Newish suburbanish buildings of poor construction quality can never match the irreplacable buildings that were lost.
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Old 01-24-2013, 02:44 PM
 
Location: "Daytonnati"
4,245 posts, read 5,756,939 times
Reputation: 2958
The thread parent was asking a very general question. Discussion around the metro area...well I think we all agree its not booming but its not stagnant or declining either...slow and steady wins the race.

For the city itself, a few things:

1. Solid in-town neighborhoods that have and will continue to be desirable places:
a. Hyde Park
b. Mnt Lookout
c. Observatory
d. Grandin Road area
e. Alms Park area

2. Gentrified areas that will continue to be solid investments.
a. Mnt Adams
b. Clifton (possibly always nice, like Grandin or Hyde Park)

3. Areas being redeveloped or gentrified
a. Northside
b. OTR (Gateway Quarter, Prospect Hill, etc)
c. Oakely
d. East side, along the river.
d. Columbia

4. Areas that are essentially inner city ghettos, expect population loss and demoitions:
a. Whats left of the west end
b. Walnut Hills
c. Avondale
d. parts of OTR (still)

5. Older areas that are declining (future ghettos?)
a. Price Hill?
b. Mill Creek Valley areas (like Camp Washington, Elmwood place, Hartwell, etc)
c. Sedamsville?

...and you can go neighborhood by neighborhood and sort of make these categorizations.

Focus seems to be on #3 and generalizing from that..."oh look the city is coming back!!!" I see #3 and #1 & #2 as the strong suite. This is what seperates Cincy from, say, Cleveland and makes it more like Pbgh and Louisville.

Weak points are #4...the expansion of the ghetto, population loss, housing deterioration, vacancy and abandonment outside of the 'hot areas' like Gateway Quarter and the better neighborhoods. This might be what is accounting for the population loss in Cincy proper.
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Old 01-24-2013, 02:46 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati(Silverton)
1,577 posts, read 2,305,288 times
Reputation: 651
Chicago had 70 murders in one day? I don't believe that.
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Old 01-24-2013, 03:08 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,832,929 times
Reputation: 924
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dayton Sux View Post
Focus seems to be on #3 and generalizing from that..."oh look the city is coming back!!!"
Well, for me, I get excited over number three because cities typically do not do well without a solid, vibrant urban core. Even metro areas that are relatively healthy, such as Dayton, are in danger of being dragged down by a stagnant (or declining) anchor city. I see what is happening downtown/OTR/Pendleton as the beginning. Not that the city as a whole is coming back. But, in my opinion, this is where it starts. Cincinnati is doing some very important things at the moment, even though it may not be city wide at the moment.

Don't we have to start somewhere?
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Old 01-24-2013, 03:10 PM
 
800 posts, read 697,835 times
Reputation: 552
Population loss in the city has mostly to do with demographic trends, especially lower birthrate and singles tending to move into areas once populated by families with children. For example a fully gentrified OTR in 2020 might only have half the population it did in 1920.

And all things are not equal if the number of wealthy and poor people remains the same. Downtown becomes a very, very different place if it becomes the neighborhood business district for a population of 10-20,000 professionals living in former Class C office space. Part of the reason why European cities are so nice to visit is because the poor are at least 5 miles from the center of town. That is the direction all American cities are all currently headed if they aren't there already.
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Old 01-24-2013, 03:17 PM
 
Location: "Daytonnati"
4,245 posts, read 5,756,939 times
Reputation: 2958
^
I think that was 3CDCs original focus, on doing investments in the downtown area for residential conversions....and then moved out into the Gateway Quarter after the riots?
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Old 01-24-2013, 03:21 PM
 
Location: Over-the-Rhine, Ohio
548 posts, read 608,945 times
Reputation: 643
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dayton Sux View Post
The thread parent was asking a very general question. Discussion around the metro area...well I think we all agree its not booming but its not stagnant or declining either...slow and steady wins the race.

For the city itself, a few things:

1. Solid in-town neighborhoods that have and will continue to be desirable places:
a. Hyde Park
b. Mnt Lookout
c. Observatory
d. Grandin Road area
e. Alms Park area

2. Gentrified areas that will continue to be solid investments.
a. Mnt Adams
b. Clifton (possibly always nice, like Grandin or Hyde Park)

3. Areas being redeveloped or gentrified
a. Northside
b. OTR (Gateway Quarter, Prospect Hill, etc)
c. Oakely
d. East side, along the river.
d. Columbia

4. Areas that are essentially inner city ghettos, expect population loss and demoitions:
a. Whats left of the west end
b. Walnut Hills
c. Avondale
d. parts of OTR (still)

5. Older areas that are declining (future ghettos?)
a. Price Hill?
b. Mill Creek Valley areas (like Camp Washington, Elmwood place, Hartwell, etc)
c. Sedamsville?

...and you can go neighborhood by neighborhood and sort of make these categorizations.

Focus seems to be on #3 and generalizing from that..."oh look the city is coming back!!!" I see #3 and #1 & #2 as the strong suite. This is what seperates Cincy from, say, Cleveland and makes it more like Pbgh and Louisville.

Weak points are #4...the expansion of the ghetto, population loss, housing deterioration, vacancy and abandonment outside of the 'hot areas' like Gateway Quarter and the better neighborhoods. This might be what is accounting for the population loss in Cincy proper.

Just a note. ALL of OTR is gentrifying. The area North of Liberty is called the Brewery District. The Master Plan is in FULL effect and we should see some major changes in the next two years. Also, Walnut Hills is really trying hard to make a comeback. I think they'll be in the gentrifying list within five years.
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Old 01-24-2013, 03:26 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,832,929 times
Reputation: 924
Quote:
Originally Posted by ProkNo5 View Post
Just a note. ALL of OTR is gentrifying.
I see a lot of activity north of Liberty, just not on the same scale as what 3CDC is generating. There is investment and construction north of Liberty. I see the results every day.
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Old 01-24-2013, 04:02 PM
 
800 posts, read 697,835 times
Reputation: 552
>I think that was 3CDCs original focus, on doing investments in the downtown area for residential conversions....and then moved out into the Gateway Quarter after the riots?

I'm not sure what, specifically, 3CDC's original mission statement was, but it formed in 2003 or 2004, after the riot. The first thing it did was manage the reconstruction of Fountain Square and the Gateway Condos, the mediocre units tacked on the Kroger parking garage at Central Parkway & Vine. These units were very slow to sell even though they were completed around 2005, years before the collapse. I haven't been inside them but everyone who I've talked to says the units are junk.
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