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Old 02-02-2013, 11:10 AM
 
109 posts, read 134,836 times
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I would absolutely support fines for unshoveled walkways. I always shovel my walkway, and the walkway of my elderly neighbors across the street, ASAP when it snows. I also clear our cars off so that we don't spew snow all over the driver behind us. My grandmother lives by herself in Chicago, and anywhere she's ever lived she's had neighbors that would shovel her walk and her entire driveway, every time it snowed, without her having to ask. When I was a kid, my father and I would shovel for our elderly neighbors. It's part of living in a society. I don't know why that doesn't happen around here. It's baffling.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sarah Perry View Post
Sidewalks were shoveled in Lexington where I lived for many years, too. The local government would actually cite you (usually businesses, but occasionally homeowners, too) if you didn't clear the sidewalk within a reasonable time after a snowfall. I was astounded that NO ONE clears them here. Really feel sorry for bus riders and people who obviously need to be out walking, sometimes resorting to the danger of walking in the street. Especially when after a few days it packs down into ice.
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Old 02-02-2013, 11:24 AM
 
5,658 posts, read 8,774,664 times
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I've seen mixed results in the areas where I've lived. Here in MO nobody seems to shovel their walks. In CT everyone did and the same with Maine. In western NY including Buffalo some did and some did not. Can't remember whether they did or not in Indy since we barely had any snow the winter I was there. In MN I was not in an area that had sidewalks. I hope people in Covington will take care of their walks.
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Old 02-02-2013, 12:16 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
31,262 posts, read 57,461,137 times
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Quote:
Why does no one shovel their walkways in this city?
Because: Most people in Cincinnati are irrationally afraid of snow.

Then there's the telephone-game rumors that if they shovel their walks and someone falls, they'll be liable, but if they don't shovel their walks and someone falls, they won't be liable because snow is an act of God.

Which of course is ridiculous. I'd never heard that one before I moved to Cincinnati.

What's even more astounding is when the downtown merchants don't shovel their walks. Walking around downtown after a storm can be downright dangerous. Of course, most merchants do clear their walks; it's the ones that don't that make it so maddening.

I shovel my walk if it's a couple of inches or more, and if there's no hope that the sun will melt away the snow. The city ordinance here says I must clear the walk within 24 hours after the snow stops falling.

The steps, though, get swept off or the mailman grouses (he doesn't bother using the walk).
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Old 02-02-2013, 12:44 PM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,392,180 times
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WILWRadio... I feel the main interest you had in Snow Emergency noone has answered. That is, if you life on a street with signs declaring Snow Emergency Route, when are you required to move a vehicle from the street and how long do you have to do it?

We have seen the definition of Level 1, 2, and 3 Snow Emergencies declared by governmental jurisdictions. But these are warnings to motorists. If you live on a posted Snow Emergency Route, when are you required to move your vehicle? If it is Level 1 that is just about any time it snows.
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Old 02-02-2013, 01:06 PM
 
5,658 posts, read 8,774,664 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
WILWRadio... I feel the main interest you had in Snow Emergency noone has answered. That is, if you life on a street with signs declaring Snow Emergency Route, when are you required to move a vehicle from the street and how long do you have to do it?

We have seen the definition of Level 1, 2, and 3 Snow Emergencies declared by governmental jurisdictions. But these are warnings to motorists. If you live on a posted Snow Emergency Route, when are you required to move your vehicle? If it is Level 1 that is just about any time it snows.
Thanks. That is what I needed to know.
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Old 02-02-2013, 02:12 PM
 
2,886 posts, read 3,960,979 times
Reputation: 1499
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
Because: Most people in Cincinnati are irrationally afraid of snow.

Then there's the telephone-game rumors that if they shovel their walks and someone falls, they'll be liable, but if they don't shovel their walks and someone falls, they won't be liable because snow is an act of God.

Which of course is ridiculous. I'd never heard that one before I moved to Cincinnati.

What's even more astounding is when the downtown merchants don't shovel their walks. Walking around downtown after a storm can be downright dangerous. Of course, most merchants do clear their walks; it's the ones that don't that make it so maddening.

I shovel my walk if it's a couple of inches or more, and if there's no hope that the sun will melt away the snow. The city ordinance here says I must clear the walk within 24 hours after the snow stops falling.

The steps, though, get swept off or the mailman grouses (he doesn't bother using the walk).
People in Lexington are even more pathologically afraid of a few flakes of snow than people are here, but the city enforced a variety of these quality-of-life type ordinances consistently enough that I think it reinforced civically responsible behavior to an extent that simply doesn't happen in Cincinnati.

But hey, I accept how things are even though I sometimes wish there were better enforcement. The only time I've complained to a property owner was a couple years ago when a full week after a substantial snowfall I had to navigate the stretch of packed-down ice on in front of the Wyoming Board of Education offices. They did reply to my email with a bogus sounding excuse that they "thought it had been taken care of." Seriously? You couldn't look out the window once in an entire week and notice nobody had shoveled?
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Old 02-02-2013, 02:49 PM
 
Location: In a happy place
3,707 posts, read 6,585,407 times
Reputation: 7332
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
Because: Most people in Cincinnati are irrationally afraid of snow.

Then there's the telephone-game rumors that if they shovel their walks and someone falls, they'll be liable, but if they don't shovel their walks and someone falls, they won't be liable because snow is an act of God.

Which of course is ridiculous. I'd never heard that one before I moved to Cincinnati.

What's even more astounding is when the downtown merchants don't shovel their walks. Walking around downtown after a storm can be downright dangerous. Of course, most merchants do clear their walks; it's the ones that don't that make it so maddening.

I shovel my walk if it's a couple of inches or more, and if there's no hope that the sun will melt away the snow. The city ordinance here says I must clear the walk within 24 hours after the snow stops falling.

The steps, though, get swept off or the mailman grouses (he doesn't bother using the walk).
I have had a lawyer and an insurance agent both tell me that. I still clear my walks and drive though. I like to get out and get some fresh air and exercise (within reason).
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Old 02-02-2013, 04:27 PM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,392,180 times
Reputation: 1920
Quote:
Originally Posted by rrtechno View Post
I have had a lawyer and an insurance agent both tell me that. I still clear my walks and drive though. I like to get out and get some fresh air and exercise (within reason).
I have have people tell me that years past also. If you clear your sidewalk of snow, the temperature elevates so what little is left melts, and then it refreezes into ice and some one falls and breaks their hip they can sue you. So you are better off doing nothing. Never made sense to me but I know strange things occur in law. If anyone has a reasonably factual source on this please post it so people will start cleaning their sidewalks.
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Old 02-02-2013, 04:47 PM
 
109 posts, read 134,836 times
Reputation: 153
Sue me then. I don't want to live in a society where I have to be scared to shovel my walk.
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Old 02-04-2013, 09:07 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
577 posts, read 1,006,490 times
Reputation: 250
I have heard of people not clearing their sidewalk because of the liability and I have also heard of a Good Samaritan clause. I always shovel my sidewalk just as a courtesy.

The City of Cincinnati has an ordinance on clearing sidewalks. I have heard that it is not enforced.

Ohio Revised Code 723.011 authorizes the City of Cincinnati to require by ordinance that property
owners timely remove snow and ice from abutting or adjoining sidewalks. ORC 723.011 provides:

The legislative authority of a municipal corporation, in addition to the powers conferred by
sections 729.01 to 729.10, inclusive, of the Revised Code, may require, by ordinance, by the
imposition of suitable penalties or otherwise, that the owners and occupants of abutting lots
and lands shall keep the sidewalks, curbs, and gutters in repair and free from snow or any
nuisance.
Section 723-57 of the Cincinnati Municipal Code requires property owners to timely remove snow
and Section 723-59 of the Cincinnati Municipal Code requires property owners to timely remove ice,
pursuant to ORC 723.011. The penalty for violating these sections is a fine of up to $25.00.
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