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Old 02-02-2013, 03:42 PM
 
2,492 posts, read 3,652,794 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
^^ I guess that is why P&G located their Global Health Care Headquarters in Mason, the impossibility of recruiting the talent to operate a global business. I know several people who work there and they simply love the fact they can live in a country club environment (there are 3 within a short distance of P&G) with a 10 minute commute, never getting on an expressway.

But perhaps when you are actually trying to create a product your attitude is a little different. Just leave me alone in my environment, let me do my job and hopefully be productive, but permit me to go home and enjoy my life and kids.

I do agree with your summary of dunnhumby since they are just a glorified consulting firm. They had better keep their visibility out in front of their customers so they don't forget them. True they have been successful with rapid growth. But that has occurred before with a collapse just as fast as the growth. Not that I am wishing that on them, but they are wise in not biting off too much.
Sorry KJ, you're arguing apples and oranges. Dunnhumby isn't P&G's research facilities and its workforce couldn't be more different. Dunnhumby's 20-somethings absolutely DEMAND hip urban environments. Not to mention, the companies that dunnhumby works with are almost entirely located in the same environments.

You're not going to attract a bright, talented college grad to move here from California, Colorado or Washington DC to live in the burbs - no matter how comfy they are to you. They just don't want that lifestyle anymore - at least not at that stage of their lives. They want downtown environments, diversity, rail transit, hip walkable neighborhoods, etc. ... Not Applebee's, Chili's and McMansion-lined cul-de-sacs with exactly two stick trees in the front yard.
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Old 02-02-2013, 04:20 PM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,360,925 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by abr7rmj View Post
Not Applebee's, Chili's and McMansion-lined cul-de-sacs with exactly two stick trees in the front yard.
I would rather have two stick trees and some grass than a rusted sign post pole when I walk out the door. But that is where we differ. And guess what, I had several stick trees which 30 years later are now 45 feet or higher. I fact I have had to pay to have them topped for fear they would blow over on the house. That is when you know the neighborhood you chose was the correct one and you belong there.

There is only one thing I am confident off, when the kiddies come and the wife says maybe I should stay home to make sure they are taken care of, it will be Mason, West Chester, Loveland, Milford, and Anderson where they move to. Everything is hip neighborhoods, professional contacts and intellectual stimulus up to then. But suddenly, when the kids come, focus changes. It amounts to I see my legacy through them, so how best can I insure I do not scre**w this up.
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Old 02-02-2013, 05:29 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
But suddenly, when the kids come, focus changes. It amounts to I see my legacy through them, so how best can I insure I do not scre**w this up.
That's where you just don't get that some people live in cities all their lives. Millions and millions in fact. You do what works for you and have fun with it, eh?
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Old 02-02-2013, 05:47 PM
 
Location: Mason, OH
9,259 posts, read 13,360,925 times
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Originally Posted by TomJones123 View Post
That's where you just don't get that some people live in cities all their lives. Millions and millions in fact. You do what works for you and have fun with it, eh?
Yes I do. And when I look around the Greater Cincinnati Metro Area, I have to believe I am in the majority. Those millions and millions may be elsewhere in the country, but they are not in Cincinnati or where I live.

The urban section of downtown Cincinnati measures in the tens of thousands optimistically. There have never been millions involved and I don't believe I will ever live long enough to see that. But there are millions involved in the greater metro area and I believe the majority are reasonably content with their lot in life. Cincinnati is not NYC and I hope it never becomes that.

Downtown Cincinnati can provide an urban lifestyle for those who desire it. But to say it is where everyone in the new millenia wants to live, I don't think so.

Last edited by kjbrill; 02-02-2013 at 06:06 PM..
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Old 02-02-2013, 06:18 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
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Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
Yes I do. And when I look around the Greater Cincinnati Metro Area, I have to believe I am in the majority.
ROFLMAO!

If you always have to draw negative comparisons and boast your perceived superiority, then it goes to show that you must feel some sort of insecurity about how great things really are.

Can we get back to Dunnhumby now? Or must you insist on derailing another thread into the kjbrill show.
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Old 02-02-2013, 06:33 PM
 
2,492 posts, read 3,652,794 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbrill View Post
I would rather have two stick trees and some grass than a rusted sign post pole when I walk out the door. But that is where we differ. And guess what, I had several stick trees which 30 years later are now 45 feet or higher. I fact I have had to pay to have them topped for fear they would blow over on the house. That is when you know the neighborhood you chose was the correct one and you belong there.

There is only one thing I am confident off, when the kiddies come and the wife says maybe I should stay home to make sure they are taken care of, it will be Mason, West Chester, Loveland, Milford, and Anderson where they move to. Everything is hip neighborhoods, professional contacts and intellectual stimulus up to then. But suddenly, when the kids come, focus changes. It amounts to I see my legacy through them, so how best can I insure I do not scre**w this up.
Eden Park and Washington Park - both in the heart of the city - have trees you could only dream of.
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Old 02-02-2013, 07:50 PM
 
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Regarding this whole hip urban downtown vs suburban lifestyle thing. Here's my two cents.

I went for an interview at Columbia University in NYC, and I had an interesting conversation with one of the professors. She said that the pay sucked, the facilities sucked, and living in NYC is more difficult compared to suburban rhode island (where she was before). However, what compelled her to stay was the fact that she got to interact with the brightest minds in the country and work on cutting edge stuff on a day to day basis.

In fact, that is what attracts people to DC, Manhattan, Boston, Chicago, San Fran, etc. Do you want to work on the latest HIV treatments? Do cutting edge robotics work? Do you want to work for the local paper or travel to afghanistan and interview abused women? Do you want to be an ambassador? etc etc

Larger cities tend to have more of these opportunities, which attract talent, which in turn attracts more talent because the talent is already there (a positive feedback cycle).

Now big cities have their negatives, for one they can be prohibitively expensive, and in the end, that's usually the most important factor. But additionally, in these places it can be easy to lose your initial passion and enter a state of constant competition with other for the sake of competition (the so-called rat race).

Also someone mentioned it earlier, and I agree that there is beginning to be a tipping point. San Francisco is breath taking; walking along the beach and across the golden gate bridge is a wonderful experience not just for the natural beauty but you get the sense that the community is vibrant as well. However, if you can barely afford to buy a crappy house with a mid-six figure salary, then priorities may need to be adjusted. And it seems, more and more people are readjusting their priorities as people are leaving NY for north carolina and leaving california for texas.

Coming back to Cincinnati, high density facilitates ease of access to these people, which is what young people prioritize. Young upwardly mobile people want to interact and socialize with other young upwardly mobile people. The reasons should be self evident: a common outlook, networking opportunities (so that they can create that new start up), stronger dating pool, etc.

A complacent community is dangerous because what may easily happen is that their brightest kids, feeling stifled by the local environment leave and never come back. I grew up in Memphis, and this is precisely what I observed. All of us who left for half decent colleges after high school never came back if we could help it. there have been a number of articles that have commented on this phenomenon. Most recently, I saw this link from reddit: Memphis: Losing Ground in the Race for Talent Smart City Memphis

I think Cincinnati has huge potential with a strong economic base, excellent culture amenities, unique geography for the region, a solid local university, and a central location with respect to 3 major metropolitan centers (each with strong universities) and another major college town. In addition, you CAN be someone here. The children's hospital world class. The university of Cincinnati is extremely strong. You have the obvious PG, kroger, and Macy's, but GE, Toyota and numerous other major companies have a strong presence here.

Thus, Cincinnati could easily recruit the brightest people from indy, columbus, lexington, louisville to start with and then nationally. However, if Cincinnati wishes to be complacent and stay resistant to change, its smartest native young people aren't going to try hard to support their home and they will simply move .

Sorry for the ramble.
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Old 02-02-2013, 08:06 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,827,918 times
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Originally Posted by det2011sb View Post
Sorry for the ramble.
Nope, no ramble. Great post and I repped you for it.
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Old 02-02-2013, 08:34 PM
 
1,295 posts, read 1,519,319 times
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kjbrill, out of all your mostly-off-topic and off-base ramblings, I see one thing which is interesting and insightful. That is your question about what tech-savvy means. I don't know about NASA and medical tech people being leaps and bounds ahead of Google and dunnhumby. Actually, I'd say that's not true at all. NASA and medical people certainly are using things which Google people work on (especially concerning AI). But the point that some of these less-sexy workplaces are equally cutting-edge is reasonable. dunnhumby is involved in marketing, which means they have to be especially image-conscious.

dunnhumby has made a business decision that having the sexy, young, cutting-edge image is important for them when it comes to recruiting talent. I guess you disagree with that, but it's what they've decided. You asked what I consider to be high-tech about dunnhumby's operations. I would say they use cutting-edge data mining and statistical analysis with artificial intelligence. AI is huge across many fields, both sexy and not-sexy. Google hires many of the brightest minds working in the field. dunnhumby is hoping to hire people of that ilk, too.

Once the people are hooked and working for the company, they can move to the burbs if they wish at a later life stage. The point is to get the people who are largely mobile and steeped in the newest software and technological fads: young people.

I grew up off of Ludlow Ave. in Clifton. We had a yard and woods to roam through and multiple parks within walking distance, in a safe environment. As well as a business district (with a movie theater!) to walk to, and a couple other business districts in biking or far-walking distance. I'm very glad my parents had the mind not to move to West Chester or wherever. My dad grew up in Clifton, too. It's a nice, urban place for families. With a lot more interesting things for kids to do than out in the cul-de-sacs. Not that this is really relevant to the thread, but your posts seem to infer this sort of life is not an option.
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Old 02-02-2013, 09:46 PM
 
864 posts, read 1,196,697 times
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Originally Posted by det2011sb View Post
Sorry for the ramble.
You can ramble here anytime. Nice one!
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